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Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/03/2019 in all areas

  1. I was at a local restaurant the other night and thought I’d share the mural they have on their wall depicting our local Main Street. Pretty cool..... Enjoy!
    5 points
  2. Which goes back to the earlier point that most members just don't care. You've got a few people in a cage match to the death while the overwhelming majority are oblivious and/or indifferent. Which is kinda too bad, because folks might raise an eyebrow at some of the goings-on if only their eyes were open to begin with.
    5 points
  3. This is my 62 that I just finished last fall. I bought it in 2009 for $2300 and a 69 TBird in trade, probably around a $2500 car. The Lincoln needed a trunklid and I converted a sedan decklid to fit all the convertible specific parts. There’s no doubt they are complicated. I painted it myself, very challenging to do a metallic finish because I didn’t want any panel transitions not blending so it all had to be done at once. Meant a lot of tricky masking to have the top in a partially retracted position to facilitate spraying the panel that the top sits on when top is full up.
    4 points
  4. Thanks for such detailed information. I will see if I can locate the AMA Specs, but it won't be easy online. The previous post about Coker Classics has me more than concerned. I seldom ever show a car, as we have a 50-car collection in Canfield, Ohio for display purposes. See www.tipcars.us On very rare occasions I will have a car judged, so whenever possible I try to stay as close to original as possible. We now have the engine out and the fenders, hood, and deck lid have all been stripped to bare metal and in primer. The matching number low mileage engine and transmission have been removed for a refreshing and other than the fire wall, the rest of the car is now to bare metal, but a lot of hand sanding and grinding in the door jambs and the small inner corners is still required. Surprisingly there were no rust outs, other than one hole in the front of the right rear fender housing and a small patch on the same area on the opposite side. I am a new member of the '53-'54 Skylark Club, but i don't believe they have a forum as yet. Fred
    4 points
  5. Hi All Just joined the forum. I live in the Detroit area, I'm very active in very early steam cars. I have a 1901 Locomobile steamer (pic attached) and I'm currently restoring a 1901 Model 65 Conrad steamer built in Buffalo NY. I look forward to reading up on all the great info here. -Ron
    3 points
  6. Sort of a reverse-engineered reason for posting on the "Me and My Buick" thread, but I bought another Buick this past fall and thought I would be the "responsible" car owner and sell my other one (the '53 Special). I had the sale ad up on Kijiji last month (the "Canadian Craigslist") and over one week's time it had more than 2000 views. I received several emails and calls, which was gratifying, but then I made the fatal error of going out to the garage and starting her up. That's when I realized I couldn't bring myself to sell her. 6 years ago, I was sitting at my desk at the office when an email came in from my former boss and now friend (I had moved departments at work). Being a car collector himself, we often talked about cars, and he knew that I had been looking for an older car to ease into the hobby. In his email he passed along a message from a car club that he belonged to. One of the members was selling his collection (mostly Model A and T Fords), but there were a few other makes, one being a 1953 Buick Special. In the email my friend told me "I know these cars and they'll be gone tomorrow. I'm going to see them in two hours. I've asked the owner to hold a few until I get there. Want to come?" I went over to my current boss (who was also a friend, and another old car nut) and told him that I was having my mid-life crisis right now and needed to go buy a car (at the time, I was close to turning 40). He laughed and said "If I didn't have meetings today, I'd go with you guys." When my pal and I arrived at the owner's place, the cars were tightly parked in an insulated garage, with 18 inches between everything (he had more than two dozen). When he pulled the dust cover off the Buick, I knew that was the one for me. He had purchased the car some 12 years earlier, and had only driven it twice in all those years! A deal was made, I bought the Buick and my friend bought a 1956 Pontiac. My car is the 4 door post (41D), built in Flint. It was painted in 2000, and even though the two-tone of silver under the sweepspear isn't to code, I like the way it looks. To be honest, there's a number of things that aren't quite right about the car (some issues and "fixes" I've inherited from previous owners, but that's all part of the hobby). Since buying it, I've been working away at issues each season, trying to make it a better driver. My goal is to keep the car as stock as I can (or least keep it in the same spirit as stock). The Buick Special is also significant to me as it's not only the first old car I've owned, it's actually also the first car I've EVER owned in my life. I live and work downtown in my city, so I'd rent a car on weekends if I needed one. It's fun at car shows when other people are talking and lamenting about their past rides to be able to say "Yes, I remember the first car I ever owned. I drove it here." The Buick is also a standard (which was another learning curve for me), but the clutch was really forgiving (mercifully) and people were good natured for the first two weeks when I would sometimes stall in front of them (well.....MOST of them were.....). The Special has been great to drive, and I've put several thousand miles on it (to the point where my friend reminds me "It's not a daily driver, you know: it's a 65 year old car!"). So, that's how I ended up on the "Me and My Buick" section - because I'm in an emotionally codependent relationship with a 1953 Buick Special (and I'm okay with that...which I know is also a cry for help). So, I pulled the ad down off Kijiji, and am now just getting ready to go and pick up the new beauty I bought - a terrific '53 Roadmaster with only 36,000 original (and documented) miles. Perhaps I'll write a post about this new purchase later. Here's to car season 2019! Josh
    3 points
  7. 1937 LaSalle. NOT a Ford V8 emblem.
    3 points
  8. I wouldn't call 36 votes out of 6628 members representative. What a joke. Al Malachowski BCA #8965 "500 Miles West of Flint"
    3 points
  9. its not much of an update, but after many hours or cleaning up the bare metal trying to get the pitting, rust, old paint cleaned up, some dents knocked out, fixing some old repairs from a previous owner in the front fender, it got a skim coat of filler in a few spots and a some high build primer on the passenger side. Good to see it looking a little more whole for the first time, but it was sort of an experiment to see what I could get away with in regards to some of the blemished/ pitted sheet metal. A few people had suggested just covering it all in filler, but I wasn't too keen on that since I would drive myself crazy with sanding it all down and getting it straight, and for the most part, wasn't really necessary. The U-Pol high build covered most of it, with the exception of a few areas where the body trim was that was a little heavier pitted, but overall, im pretty pleased with it.
    3 points
  10. Happy boy! Got it open (twice) using a thin packing tape cut to fit the slot in the striker. Seems I had the striker adjusted all the wrong way, all good now. many, many thanks for those suggestions! Rodney 😀😀😀😀😀😀
    3 points
  11. Brakes are good,tires fair,got safety tubes and I ain't scared.Commander Cody.
    3 points
  12. I've not run the pump for 7-1/2 hours with no noticeable change in its performance. I will probably keep this up all week just to be certain it is ok. I then have to take it apart and do a final lap on the pieces and insert the dowel pins that will make it easier to position the pump body. While it was running I started on the pressure relief valve and connection to the oil filler. This is a piece of 1" brass bar, drilled and reamed to 5/8". Then threaded. The unthreaded part will be soldered into the oil manifold. These strangely out of focus pictures don't do it any favors but you can just make out the threaded part. And this is how it goes together. The banjo fitting will be connected to a copper line that will return excess oil to the sump. I still have to make a cap for the end and the internal parts.
    3 points
  13. https://www.barrett-jackson.com/Media/Home/Reader/1947-buick-super-8-custom-convertible-resto-mod-for-sale-palm-beach-florida-auction/?utm_source=website&utm_medium=eblast&utm_campaign=PB19&utm_term=article&utm_content=04022019
    3 points
  14. Learn that google is your friend, if you don't have to talk to it and even if you do, it probably could have found this: http://www.lacar.com/2018-buick-lacrosse-avenir-1938-y-job/
    2 points
  15. Agree, nice job! Modeleh, do you make housecalls? 😊
    2 points
  16. And a nice beach towel (the picture of the sheet was made in 2013 when I bought the Buick) Thank you family !!
    2 points
  17. Last Thursday it was my birthday, and my parents with my brother made me two beautiful gifts A nice cardboard ... With new carpet inside for my Buick !
    2 points
  18. Gene is a GREAT guy. His Dad was one of the original Band of Brothers, and was instrumental in making the series which we all throughly enjoyed. May those brave heroes all rest in peace.
    2 points
  19. Or they might pick out the names of the candidates who they DON'T know and vote for them.
    2 points
  20. (continued from the last post to see if I can use Flickr to get around the 9mb post limit) I was mostly experimenting and just wanted to do the door and fenders, but did the cowl and door jambs as well. still a lot of body work to do, but atleast I have a better idea of the course to go now. next will be the roof, and rear qtrs. before spinning it around for the driver side, (shop is full right now and space is at a premium so I have to work with that for the time being) 20190330_140843 by Dan Haas, on Flickr Also acquired what ends up being, 2 more sets of internals, plus a few extras, for the 6 bolt transmission to replace the chipped gears that were in my transmission when I bought it so I can piece meal the best ones for the rebuild. I still need to find a few things before I can mate the engine and trans, but im on the way. specifically still need everything clutch related, a starter, and the correct front motor mount plate as my 320 came from a later year and has the incorrect plate. I live alone and can rebuild a transmission in the living room if I want to! 20190226_192650 by Dan Haas, on Flickr 20190222_163154-1 by Dan Haas, on Flickr and also the 1958 edsel villager is now in the garage at my house to start mechanical work, along with his wife not wanting it at their house. 20181229_153359 by Dan Haas, on Flickr 20181220_153518 by Dan Haas, on Flickr
    2 points
  21. sounds like functional obsolescence, it confirms what JV has been saying, they never expected this car to last more than a few years
    2 points
  22. Probably the best place to find one is ebay. Put this 1979 Buick service manual in the search and there were 125 to pick including the Fisher Body manual for your car this morning.
    2 points
  23. I have seen it at a swap meet a few years ago, but I had no use for it. Surprised they scrapped the Hudson engine. It looked not all that bad. I bought the Buffalo hub , drum to drum , Hudson rear end off them very reasonably. If nothing else I needed the hubs. Greg in Canada
    2 points
  24. The FWD setup introduced with the dramatic new Olds Toronado body in 1966 was rather over-engineered and extensively tested in advance of production. It worked very well, overcoming most of the vices of FWD such as torque-steer. The same FWD driveline setup was then used for the '67 Eldorado, and was shared by both models for 20+ years. This FWD setup continued until 1978 with only minor modifications starting in 1969 using different front wheel bearings and spindles adapted for disc brakes. That attests to the overall soundness of the FWD design that GM came up with. I read that Buick was offered the option to go FWD in 1966 on the newly styled Riviera, as this was to share the same cowl as the Eldo and Toro (I think these cars all share the same windshield too). That was I believe the start of body design homologation between GM divisions, using a standard cowl structure for multiple car models. The cowl I understand is the most expensive part of the car to design and engineer (don't ask me why). However, Buick elected to stay with rear wheel drive and the stable cruciform frame that they'd used on the Riviera since 1963. I owned a '68 Eldorado for 20 years. Under most normal driving conditions you'd never know it was a FWD car, with its soporific floaty ride and excellent AM/FM Stereo radio. This car probably had the longest hood in the industry, and its doors were huge too. One plus of FWD was its excellent grip in the snow! However, handing could be ponderous , although its 472 cu. in. engine with 500 ft. lb. of torque was more than up to spinning the front tires on command. But, in now way would you call this car sporty or nimble. At almost 5,000 lbs, it could be downright scary trying to stop and maneuver this car in a panic! Despite having front disc brakes it had a disconcerting tendency to lock up the rear drums and for the rear to try to come around during a panic stop. That quickly taught me to keep a good safe distance from the car ahead, especially at speed, and to not expect it to handle like.... a RIVERA! The overall experience driving this car was once described by a magazine writer (this time writing about a '70 Toro) as "The irresistible force meeting the immovable object." Oddly apt, I thought. By comparison, our Rivs are much more of a driver's car. Yes, big, but not too big. The brakes are better, instilling considerably more confidence when driving fast on occasion. Better acceleration, better cornering, while providing improved overall feedback to the driver. Not to say the Eldo/Toro were bad cars - they had their mystique for a time as the only FWD luxury vehicles produced in America in the late '60's. I think Buick's decision to retain RWD in the Riviera was the correct one. It allowed them to differentiate their personal luxury offering from those of Olds and Cadillac, while retaining the proven handling, driveability, and reliability Buick was known for in those days.
    2 points
  25. Tonight i started laying out the cut lines on the sedan and on the coupe. I plan to cut the coupe tomorrow and finish laying out rear of sedan. Check it out.
    2 points
  26. Yes, Gene is a good Riviera guy. He goes way back with these cars. A pleasure to deal with too.
    2 points
  27. You got it Matt, Still driving around on my (?) old "Martin Custom Tires". Nary a crack, bubble or blemish, but I did put new tubes in them about 4 years ago. No highway cruzin, but lots of around town driving. Have old Denmans on the '31 Imperial, and the same story, they look like new. Mike in Colorado
    2 points
  28. Local BCA club get together at the Airborne and Special Operations Museum in Fayetteville, NC. My wife and myself with our 68 Riviera, "The Aqua Zephyr".
    2 points
  29. Make the drive. Period. The only one who knows if the car is right for you is you. If someone else looks at it and you buy it and it isn't what you expected or they missed something, what then? You're stuck with a bum car and you're angry at someone else for a mistake you made. If a personal visit is really and truly out of the question, a knowledgeable enthusiast will be much better than an inspector. One of the companies Steve mentions above I could not recommend, and regardless of which company you hire, no inspector will ever look at the car like you will. They'll take a very close-up photo of every flaw in the paint, they might listen to it run, and they might ride with the owner while he drives it. If you're lucky, they'll lay on the ground and look under the car. They don't do compression tests or oil analysis or any of the stuff you hope a professional will test. None of them are professional car people--we've had high school shop teachers, appliance repair men, college students, taxi company dispatchers, and all kinds of other non-industry guys come inspect cars. They don't know anything about cars beyond what they learned from the inspection company that's paying them $75 to be there. Get in your car and go look at it yourself. It's the only way to be sure you get what you expect. If someone offered you the purchase price of the car to drive for 18 hours, surely you'd do it, right? Can you afford to gamble with that much money? It's the only way to be sure you don't get ripped off.
    2 points
  30. After years of fighting with grease gun couplers leaking all over the place besides into the zerk I sucked it up and spent the 30 bucks on a lock n lube coupler... Read numerous reviews including on here how great it is etc etc.. But thirty bucks for a coupler seemed awfully steep to me.. Well I got around to using it today and all I can say is wow it actually works and works well even on the fittings that were known to give me problems before no problems now..I also bought a flexzilla brand hose it's 18 inches and super flexible that also helped... Anyhow if anyone has been wondering if it's worth it.. Yes it is. https://www.flexzilla.com/lube/grease-hoses/ https://locknlube.com/products/locknlube-grease-coupler
    1 point
  31. Hands up all those who have seen anything like this in the good ole US of A..........
    1 point
  32. The question is whether to Duplicate the factory runs or not?
    1 point
  33. There is nothing inherently wrong with radial tubes in radial tires. With some types of rim you must run a tube. It is better to run tubeless if you can, because a puncture in a tube type radial will cause sudden deflation just like it does in a tube type bias ply tire. In a tubeless tire you are more likely to get a slow leak and have someone point and say "hey buddy, you got a low tire!". You might even be able to re-inflate it and drive to the tire shop.
    1 point
  34. I have never heard of a factory floor shift in one of those...really?
    1 point
  35. That might be the Seattle guy who people mistook for Mickey Rooney. He would really sizzle when the son called him his short Packard Dad. May have been provoked.
    1 point
  36. Absolutely true, put any of them in Google Earth... Western Australia has a lot of dodgy ones, but I think New Zealand has the most unpronounceable names outside of Wales. Of interest: Mumullgum - emphasis is on first syllable only Mallanganee - no emphasis on any syllable, sounds like the noise a train makes as it's rocking along the rails I have yet to hear anyone pronounce Bingeebeera, but I'd be inclined to think it's got the emphasis on the second syllable Some people get mixed up with Bulahdelah, it's pronounced Bull-a-dee-la If Ivan Saxton was to join in this conversation I'm sure he'd be able to spell out hundreds more.
    1 point
  37. The belt I ordered came in today so I'm hoping to have it running in the next couple of days followed by some pictures. I think it looks so good it should be displayed on the dining room buffet, but my wife thinks otherwise.😉
    1 point
  38. I would love to see some before pictures as well and maybe a bit of the story. Am I correct in assuming this is your grandfather's car and did it come from your great grandfather's dealership? Has it been in your family all this time or was it sold off only to be repurchased by you? I suspect you have an awesome car with an even more awesome story to go with it. Can you bring yourself to share it with us?
    1 point
  39. What is a PPI? I'm too old to keep up with all the abbreviations you cell phone people use. Bob
    1 point
  40. I think I will refit the gravity feed system. Not sure why the previous owner had fitted an electric pump. The original carburetor and gas tank are in the same places. Should work as original.
    1 point
  41. The joke they told me is we were going to Ausfahrt Germany.. Never did find it..
    1 point
  42. I agree with Ed, I've almost lost two cars to electric fuel pumps that fed too much fuel to carb, backfire, engine fire. If you insist on using an electric pump, 1)have a big ON/OFF switch easily hit when your engine catches fire, 2) use a fuel pump delivering 1 to 2 PSI mac, 3)don't trust those cheap damn chrome regulators you buy at any parts store and aren't worth a tinker's damn, 4)spend just a LITTLE effort getting your original fuel system to work, it worked when new, it'll work now, just FIX the darn thing. Do you really think the buyers back then drove out of the dealer saying "Gee, wish I had an electric fuel pump". I have a 1927 Dodge with a vacuum tank, and getting into car with a DRY vacuum tank, it works so well that 5 or 6 revolutions of the engine suck gas to the tank and start the car. It's been rebuilt properly.. Almost lost cars? 1928 Packard 443 coupe and my much cherished 1931 Pierce phaeton...
    1 point
  43. Found a 1915 Speedster. For sure it’s not correct, but it will take me on Relibility Tours.
    1 point
  44. The insurance company didn't total a car that nice for the body damage we see in the photos. There must be something badly damaged underneath or they would have paid to have that car repaired.
    1 point
  45. Years ago I was restoring a '69 Riviera. The gas tank had a huge dent in it so I wandered down to my parts car to check the condition of that one. I found someone in the past had removed the trunk inspection plate and the sender but the tank was in good condition. I dropped the tank and walked it back to the shop. As I carried the tank I heard something metallic and heavy rolling inside the trunk. I got out my flexible gripper and fished out the remnants of a locking gas cap someone had pried off. I also saw a piece of what looked like yarn so I grabbed it with my gripper and surprisingly it had some heft to it. To my surprise it was a good sized rat soaked in gasoline. Evidently he climbed through the access hole and couldn't get out. My buddy came out of the shop and observed the rat. He nudged it with his toe and all of a sudden the rat jumped up and ran full tilt to the end of the driveway. We ran to it and again he nudged it with his toe but this time he had no response. "Is he dead?" my friend asked. "Naw" I replied, "He's just run out of gas". Some of this is true!
    1 point
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