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Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/06/2019 in all areas

  1. Possibly the Parking Valet at the Beverly Hills Hilton on a joy ride.
    5 points
  2. Wonderful cars and pound-for-pound the biggest bang for the buck in the old car world. They have great road manners and superlative luxury. That one looks like it'll clean up nicely and be a good driver, but it'll cost a fortune to make it mint and you'll never recover it. Prices are extremely flat on them and I don't understand why they aren't appreciating more than they are. Obviously I'm a bit biased since I own a '41 Limited 90L, but even I have to admit that they aren't worth very much. My advice would be to pull it out, clean it up, get it running, and expect to get $15,000 o
    5 points
  3. I was browsing online one day contemplating buying an old classic car. I wasn't looking seriously, but when I came across this 65 Buick Wildcat I just thought it looked too good to not look into it more. So I hooked up the trailer and went for a couple hour drive north to take a look. It was a good deal and the car was in what I thought to be decent shape so we made a deal. Then as we were loading the car (not easy, barely fit on the trailer) I learned that the car owners wife had bought it for him as an anniversary gift three years previous with the intentions on restoring the car. I kinda f
    4 points
  4. I am a new member of BCA. My car is a 1963 Buick Wildcat convertible that I purchased in January of 2018. My grandfather had a 63 Wildcat a brand new 2 dr hardtop in Granada red/blk and even then at 9 years old I knew it was a special car. Grandpa Bill was a Buick man all the way. In my life, he owned a 56 Century, a 61 LeSabre, the Wildcat and his last car a 1965 Buick Electra. He was the superintendent of the two mills owned by Arcata Redwood Co. of California. He lived in the executive home owned by the company and it was clear by what he drove he was doing well enough for a man who came fr
    4 points
  5. I know Dennis Gage fairly well, I think (at least from the car hobby and car industry perspectives). Both he and I have been elected to the ARMO (Automotive Restoration Market Organization) and SEMA Halls of Fame. And, both of us have been very involved in the collector car hobby and the industry which serves it for a long time. One thing that Dennis told me directly, with respect to Pringles Potato Chips: Dennis is partly responsible for the contents inside the tube, but is NOT represented by the image of the mustache on the outside of the package. Dennis is a car gu
    4 points
  6. No, it is not an antique car. But it is a true one of one.This prototype of the John Deere Electric rear engine rider was rescued from a weed patch at a farm auction in central Missouri about 30 years ago. We stored it inside until we had the opportunity to have it professionally restored (no, I did NOT do the work.....I cannot paint )The mower deck is still at the restoration shop. It was an absolute mess, rusted badly from the TOP side. One of the reasons for the electric was to sell it to suburban yuppies to be able to mow with less noise. However, Deere found that the noise of the wh
    3 points
  7. Studded snow tires are expensive! Here's some more: This was the spot I got into last night This is the spot I just got in to. As you can see, some people still haven't left their spots (yellow car on the left) because it just gets piled up behind them to the point where you need a shovel, a pick axe and some good tires. I can't remember seeing people use chains, either, in my entire life. However, I did see someone else on campus with chains so I didn't feel alone. I'm sure if the car had a posi, I could have gotten out. One tire would g
    3 points
  8. Buick's need the loving touch of my custom hand to. A person standing in my shop once said " this is where cars come to die" I just need to wear a hockey mask when I start with the cut off wheel. This is the last known picture of the 1996 Road master wagons heart, before the operation/transplant started. It is now beating, with good blood/oil pressure in the black truck. Mine has a 1995 Z28 Camaro LT1, with air intake set up from a 1995 Impala. Same as the Buick, it work well in the black truck, so I set mine up the same.
    3 points
  9. The BCA BOD approved Pete's request for expenses so he is going!!!!
    3 points
  10. Another shot from last weekend's back roads cruise. An abandoned service station in Parkton, NC Same picture as above except converted to black and white then applying color AZ to the picture. Photoshop is a wonderful tool!
    3 points
  11. Hello from Tampa, Just yesterday, I bought my dream car, a '63 Riviera. It's a very solid and complete Florida car, Teal Mist with white interior. Hasn't run in 20 years. The engine does spin, so I am gonna see if I can get the car started over the next couple of days. I am sure to be asking for help in the coming months, especially with regards to the AC system and engine mechanicals. And probably power windows an power seat and....
    2 points
  12. Great guy. Bills auto Works ,216-832-8697. New equipment and well maintained. One man band and always keeps in touch.. He moved a car for me and was at my house a half hour before he said.
    2 points
  13. that's a 41 saratoga ,shame the straight 8 has gone!
    2 points
  14. I got back last night at precisely 11:00 PM after 21 hours of traveling and (mostly) waiting in airports to find about 18" of snow in my driveway so I had to spend the early morning shoveling it out. When I got to the shop, the aluminum fan I purchased from a fellow forum member was waiting for me. Not having the energy to pick up where I left off I decided to take it apart. Here it is largely dismantled. I'm very pleased with the fan and it looks as if adapting it to the Mitchell engine won't be terribly difficult. The most challenging part is the flat belt sheave. Th
    2 points
  15. ANY questions on the '63 A/C system the Turbinator could probably answer them ALL!!!!!!
    2 points
  16. Then there is the question of cause and effect. The same cause may have similar effects on different car companies. Take the hypoid rear axle. This new design of gear teeth allowed the driveshaft to be lowered 3 or 4 inches. This allowed floors to be dropped a similar amount, resulting in a lower roof line. But if the rear seat was directly above the rear axle you could not lower it and still have room for the suspension to work. So you had to move the rear seat forward to take advantage of your new low chassis. But this reduced leg room unless you moved the front seat forward. But
    2 points
  17. A horror flick like the Psycho Riviera?
    2 points
  18. Every time I see a picture of your engine I want to fly out to CA and clean up your chrome air cleaner....just sayin`... Tom
    2 points
  19. It appears to be a beautiful car under the dust. Put some air in the tires and clean it, and hope she runs. It may or may not be worth getting it to drive, but it likely would be worth getting it to start and run.
    2 points
  20. I wa Three 1935’s, but one is under restoration as we speak, two 1932’s.........and one other unnamed year for obvious reasons, and there is a twelve touring car also, and that’s all from the top of my head on 12’s........the eight list would also extend the numbers higher........Ed
    2 points
  21. Yes, I suppose it's possible. But in "totally disposable" Hollywood, I just can't see Paramount's publicity dept. shooting anyone in a 10 year old car. 😄
    2 points
  22. Someone challenged me to edit the black and white and color versions of this picture together. I was up for the challenge! I think it turned out well!
    2 points
  23. I am extremely fortunate in my choice of wife, Helen as a dedicated Francophile , hastaken charge of arranging which events we will attend, where we will stay and what we (she) want to see. Based on my experience in our previous visits to France, I am really looking forward to this years adventure.
    2 points
  24. Thanks for the welcome comments. And yes KongaMan mine has the wire wheel caps with the red, white and blue tri-shields. Hard to see in the photo.
    2 points
  25. Has anyone contacted Nicola Bulgari ?? Bet he could keep them together at his small shop ( LOL) . Bill
    2 points
  26. Even better than the Family Truckster?
    2 points
  27. Love when he climbs in a million dollar car and grinds the gears... If I was the owner, I'd throw him out on his ear!
    2 points
  28. I did some more digging in the `64 parts book and found an inconsistency...there is a listing for a fan "spacer" for the AC modification package. If the option originally included the fan clutch, as the sales description states, there would be no fan spacer. Beginning to think the AC modification option was built as pictured. Tom
    1 point
  29. I was able to get back the the Crosley engine today and stripped all the accessories off. I give it an initial cleaning with gasoline and now it is ready for deep cleaning and trying to get the paint off the aluminum. I will not be rebuilding the engine as it was running good the last time I had the convertible out. I may take the intake and exhaust off of it and the side pans and valve cover but the rest will stay, including the distributor as to remove it I will need to remove the pan and I don't want to do that. The last picture shows the engine number, Crosley guys will know what it me
    1 point
  30. A good example of the Gran Sport with the Gran Sport wheel covers that were part of the A9 Gran Sport option. Not too many came like this; most buyers ordered the optional Formula Five (rally) wheels in addition to the Gran Sport option. I think it's nice to see one every once in a while that's not just like everyone else's. Nothing wrong with the rally wheel, this is just different.
    1 point
  31. Hi Steve, thanks for the post. You should pop down here near the airport some Saturday. I'm at richardreau@hotmail.com.
    1 point
  32. Moose50, thank you for the hub! Willy
    1 point
  33. Looks like the billboard to a sweet horror file...with cool cars.
    1 point
  34. Thanks, I have already talked to Chris, he sounds very knowledgeable and professional, I will most likely ship this off to him to see if its rebuild able. thx again, peter
    1 point
  35. Well it's hard to tell which is best when your new old car (one that had been on your bucket list since you discovered matchboxes) gets delivered on Christmas day at Noon. That will be a tough one to top. That was after I had another delivered on Father's day the same year. Those deliveries were actually all just coincidental and both the transporters were happy I was willing to take delivery on a holiday. That will be a tough old car year to ever top except maybe when I finally get that Auburn. We'll have to wait and see. Back to the original topic though.
    1 point
  36. Hi Mike, i have been following your progress from Brisbane Australia. I know a chap who builds wood spoke wheels from scratch. When he steam bends the felloe or felly he makes it in two half circles which looks like two letter U’s . As soon as they are steam formed he attaches a piece of tie wire across the ends to stop them straightening as they dry. He lets them dry and does not use them until the strain goes off the wire. This takes some weeks or months. His timber is larger than yours but I would be careful to keep the bends held in position until the timber is again fully seasoned th
    1 point
  37. Even with the O ring just tight enough to hold the seals in place it tends to push the seals outer plastic housing out of shape. Not nice and square like the product drawing any longer. These seals can only work if they are pressed into a bore made to accept them. The good news is that I was able to save my stainless shaft. A quick file at the yellow(brass) ring area and crocus cloth polish has thing back in order. The brass ring area on the left side (.755) side is where the bushing seized. Every thing is now polished up again. Back to the drawing board.....
    1 point
  38. Man, I love those monsters! Wood trim too. Way to go, enjoy your new ride!
    1 point
  39. Topradman, First off, your carbs feature a date for August of 1972. (2372 breaks down as 237th day of 1972).
    1 point
  40. Have always liked small wagons for overnight trips, had an Astre wagon with a steel sleeved engine that never have any trouble. Would have considered a CTS wagon except it has too many doors. There was also a Pinto two door wagon so there were some in the '70s. .
    1 point
  41. 1 point
  42. That is a very beautiful car and I would love to be able to buy her, sadly she’s about 85k over my budget at this moment... if I win the lottery that just might be my first call! oh well, back to tinkering on my 31, at least it has the same name if not body and engine...
    1 point
  43. Those are real good points. It could be that the typical early '60's T-Bird buyer was trying to distance himself from the station wagon market as much as possible, given that there were so many of them back then. This brings up another question: 55-57 Safaris and Nomads are almost universally admired by '50's car collectors...but how well did they actually sell when new? I rarely see the Safaris (only once in person.) I know they were a lot more expensive than your standard Pontiac/Chevy 2 door sedan or HT. If they didn't sell that well when new, that would also explain why Ford ne
    1 point
  44. I'm enjoying all of the opinions! Some real good points. I agree, it's a distraction. But I'm wondering how that look would've been received by the public back then, a couple of years before the Vista Cruiser...and well before the third generation of T-Bird had become a vintage collectable (and was still seen as something new and different.) I know that the second generation of T-Bird starting in '58 was a big disappointment to the two seater fans, with many of them saying, "That's not what a T-Bird is!" (Many still say it today.) But what happened to the sales in '
    1 point
  45. 😁 I agree about the rear window. One of the few thing I don't like about the car visually, and the kind of stuff that's too common on most cars that are modified into a different body type.
    1 point
  46. Wire transfers are still the safest way to go as long as you know to whom you're sending the money. Scams aren't predicated on the wire being unsecure, they are based on the willingness of the victim to send money without doing his homework. A vast majority of fraud and scams like this would be eliminated if people would simply look before they leap like Robert did BEFORE sending the money, not after. A major component of any scam is a victim trying to get a great bargain or something he really wants and therefore they aren't really paying attention to the transactional side of the deal.
    1 point
  47. As a follow-up to John's post, I also nabbed a few shots of the '57 Roadmaster coupe displayed at the Portland Nationals, 2014:
    1 point
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