Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/06/2019 in all areas

  1. Possibly the Parking Valet at the Beverly Hills Hilton on a joy ride.
    5 points
  2. Wonderful cars and pound-for-pound the biggest bang for the buck in the old car world. They have great road manners and superlative luxury. That one looks like it'll clean up nicely and be a good driver, but it'll cost a fortune to make it mint and you'll never recover it. Prices are extremely flat on them and I don't understand why they aren't appreciating more than they are. Obviously I'm a bit biased since I own a '41 Limited 90L, but even I have to admit that they aren't worth very much. My advice would be to pull it out, clean it up, get it running, and expect to get $15,000 or so for it. Some might tell you it's worth more, you might think it's worth more because it is so big or because the interior is so nice, but it really isn't. A reasonably nice and usable '41 Limited just sold on eBay for about that much and the '41s are arguably more desirable than the '39s, although each have their supporters and ardent fans. Don't over-reach on price, focus on getting it a good home. I wish I could say it's a gold mine or that it's worth restoring, but it's not. Clean it up, make it run, sell it to the first guy who shows up with more than $15,000 in his hands. Good luck!
    5 points
  3. I was browsing online one day contemplating buying an old classic car. I wasn't looking seriously, but when I came across this 65 Buick Wildcat I just thought it looked too good to not look into it more. So I hooked up the trailer and went for a couple hour drive north to take a look. It was a good deal and the car was in what I thought to be decent shape so we made a deal. Then as we were loading the car (not easy, barely fit on the trailer) I learned that the car owners wife had bought it for him as an anniversary gift three years previous with the intentions on restoring the car. I kinda felt bad as I was driving away to some tears. His plumbing and cottage renting business had taken off and they didn't have the time to do anything with the car. It had just sat in the laneway on a tarp. Long story short I got the car home... put it on the hoist and did a proper safety on it... fixed up a few things... and she is now on the road. It is an original Canadian built car with I am pretty sure the original driveline. I drive it all the time in the better weather and am looking forward to Spring. She needs some more work, and I got some more parts over the winter to do some sprucing up. But I don't think I want to do too much... she's a driver.
    4 points
  4. I am a new member of BCA. My car is a 1963 Buick Wildcat convertible that I purchased in January of 2018. My grandfather had a 63 Wildcat a brand new 2 dr hardtop in Granada red/blk and even then at 9 years old I knew it was a special car. Grandpa Bill was a Buick man all the way. In my life, he owned a 56 Century, a 61 LeSabre, the Wildcat and his last car a 1965 Buick Electra. He was the superintendent of the two mills owned by Arcata Redwood Co. of California. He lived in the executive home owned by the company and it was clear by what he drove he was doing well enough for a man who came from nothing and had no formal education. I know there are Buick enthusiasts out there who don't think much of the Dynaflow transmission but that is one of the features that I loved most about his Wildcat and now mine. His wife "Babe" had an all-out driving style. She was on the gas all the time. I'd sit with my chin on the back of her seat and wait to get thrown back when she accelerated. I didn't really understand the mechanism at that age but I knew that the Wildcat was the smoothest car I had ever ridden in. When the big logging trucks would see the Wildcat coming up from behind on the 2 lane highways they would pull over as far as they could and let the bosses wife go by. And what a sound! I smile every time I drive mine. Can't wait for spring! Still getting used to this site. I hope I posted this correctly.
    4 points
  5. I know Dennis Gage fairly well, I think (at least from the car hobby and car industry perspectives). Both he and I have been elected to the ARMO (Automotive Restoration Market Organization) and SEMA Halls of Fame. And, both of us have been very involved in the collector car hobby and the industry which serves it for a long time. One thing that Dennis told me directly, with respect to Pringles Potato Chips: Dennis is partly responsible for the contents inside the tube, but is NOT represented by the image of the mustache on the outside of the package. Dennis is a car guy, no doubt. But you must remember that he is a full-time professional working to serve automotive hobbyists. He has to be "ON" whenever he is around car people, and he must work to make his shows seem exciting to viewers. If he were to act less-than-excited about a car featured on his show, it might be disastrous for the series. Dennis really does love cool old cars, but he knows that he is in the spotlight whenever he is around vintage iron. He must appear enthusiastic and excited, even if he doesn't feel well, or is having a bad day. I'm glad to call Dennis Gage a friend of mine. You must keep in mind that people who work in the industry which serves the old car hobby are AT WORK when they appear around other hobbyists. Although we really do love the cars and most of the people we meet, we must perform our various jobs effectively, or quickly become unemployed. It's something which is perhaps nearly impossible to understand, until you must depend exclusively on a career in the auto-hobby industry to pay your bills for a long time. I have done so since the early 1980's.
    4 points
  6. No, it is not an antique car. But it is a true one of one.This prototype of the John Deere Electric rear engine rider was rescued from a weed patch at a farm auction in central Missouri about 30 years ago. We stored it inside until we had the opportunity to have it professionally restored (no, I did NOT do the work.....I cannot paint )The mower deck is still at the restoration shop. It was an absolute mess, rusted badly from the TOP side. One of the reasons for the electric was to sell it to suburban yuppies to be able to mow with less noise. However, Deere found that the noise of the whirling blades was almost equal to that of the engine on gasoline powered mowers. So they glued insulation strips on the outside of the mower deck to attempt to quiet the sound. These absorbed moisture and caused rust (just like the *&^%$#@ car cover I stupidly put on one of my GTO's......very bad idea in areas with high humidity). I will post a picture of the deck when it is finished.John Deere was way ahead of the public with these electric mowers (they debuted in 1970). The prototype was probably assembled in 1969. The Deere dealers literally hated these, and the general public wasn't much different. They did not sell well.I have been interested in electric vehicles my entire life; and would have purchased an electric car in the 1970's except for what I considered a silly Missouri law which has now been repealed.About 1980, when Dad and I were trying to acquire parts, information, etc. on the electrics, I asked a sales manager who had been at the dealership long enough to remember the Electrics why the dealers hated them as they did.He laughed, and said there were two ways a salesman could get fired from the dealership. The first was to have an affair with the bosses wife, the second was to trade for a used electric.After we finished laughing, he told us that because the electric drive motor was so quiet, the motor was often left on, running down the batteries. And the servicemen were not then really up on electronics; and the onboard charger was not overly reliable.But this is the only one of one vehicle I have ever owned (I do have quite a few one of one carburetors), and I found it strictly by accident.The mower actually works very well, and if one will mow about once every five days, 3/4 of an acre may be mowed on a battery charge.Jon.
    3 points
  7. Studded snow tires are expensive! Here's some more: This was the spot I got into last night This is the spot I just got in to. As you can see, some people still haven't left their spots (yellow car on the left) because it just gets piled up behind them to the point where you need a shovel, a pick axe and some good tires. I can't remember seeing people use chains, either, in my entire life. However, I did see someone else on campus with chains so I didn't feel alone. I'm sure if the car had a posi, I could have gotten out. One tire would grip, the other wouldn't. Then, when I had chains on one tire, that tire did nothing and the tire without chains would spin... It was a vicious cycle. The other night it was -8, I was glad to see that there wasn't a pool of anti-freeze underneath the car. That would have been rough.
    3 points
  8. Buick's need the loving touch of my custom hand to. A person standing in my shop once said " this is where cars come to die" I just need to wear a hockey mask when I start with the cut off wheel. This is the last known picture of the 1996 Road master wagons heart, before the operation/transplant started. It is now beating, with good blood/oil pressure in the black truck. Mine has a 1995 Z28 Camaro LT1, with air intake set up from a 1995 Impala. Same as the Buick, it work well in the black truck, so I set mine up the same.
    3 points
  9. The BCA BOD approved Pete's request for expenses so he is going!!!!
    3 points
  10. Another shot from last weekend's back roads cruise. An abandoned service station in Parkton, NC Same picture as above except converted to black and white then applying color AZ to the picture. Photoshop is a wonderful tool!
    3 points
  11. Hello from Tampa, Just yesterday, I bought my dream car, a '63 Riviera. It's a very solid and complete Florida car, Teal Mist with white interior. Hasn't run in 20 years. The engine does spin, so I am gonna see if I can get the car started over the next couple of days. I am sure to be asking for help in the coming months, especially with regards to the AC system and engine mechanicals. And probably power windows an power seat and....
    2 points
  12. Great guy. Bills auto Works ,216-832-8697. New equipment and well maintained. One man band and always keeps in touch.. He moved a car for me and was at my house a half hour before he said.
    2 points
  13. that's a 41 saratoga ,shame the straight 8 has gone!
    2 points
  14. I got back last night at precisely 11:00 PM after 21 hours of traveling and (mostly) waiting in airports to find about 18" of snow in my driveway so I had to spend the early morning shoveling it out. When I got to the shop, the aluminum fan I purchased from a fellow forum member was waiting for me. Not having the energy to pick up where I left off I decided to take it apart. Here it is largely dismantled. I'm very pleased with the fan and it looks as if adapting it to the Mitchell engine won't be terribly difficult. The most challenging part is the flat belt sheave. The Mitchell used an early form of V-belt so I'll have to make a new sheave to replace the one that is currently there. I haven't decided yet how to do that - it's trickier than it looks because the fan won't fit in the lathe - the diameter is just slightly too big so I'll have to come up with a different method.
    2 points
  15. ANY questions on the '63 A/C system the Turbinator could probably answer them ALL!!!!!!
    2 points
  16. Then there is the question of cause and effect. The same cause may have similar effects on different car companies. Take the hypoid rear axle. This new design of gear teeth allowed the driveshaft to be lowered 3 or 4 inches. This allowed floors to be dropped a similar amount, resulting in a lower roof line. But if the rear seat was directly above the rear axle you could not lower it and still have room for the suspension to work. So you had to move the rear seat forward to take advantage of your new low chassis. But this reduced leg room unless you moved the front seat forward. But then the engine was in the road, unless you moved it forward too. But you couldn't do that unless you put it on top of the front axle and then you ran into the same problem as the rear axle, it had to be too high to allow suspension movement. Unless you made an independent front suspension. Then you could cradle the engine between the wheels, and make a body that was low yet roomy. But with the everything moved forward in relation to the wheels. This all changed weight distribution from 40/60 front/rear to more like 60/40. This in turn affected the balance of the chassis and made for a flatter ride with less pitching. And, the independent front suspension and lighter rear springs rode better than the old models. Every car went through this process and all at the same time because all were offered the hypoid axle at the same time by the company that made them. The one holdout was Ford, which stuck with the old fashioned rear axle and beam front axle 15 years after they were obsolete. I doubt one in 10,000 auto buyers in the thirties could tell you what a hypoid axle was or what it did. But every car buyer could appreciate the new low roomy comfortable riding cars . Only the cheapest cars, and a few very expensive low production cars stuck with the old beam front axle and they fell into line in a few years. Or went out of business. Thousands of similar examples could be found, of a new invention or idea that ran through the whole industry.
    2 points
  17. A horror flick like the Psycho Riviera?
    2 points
  18. Every time I see a picture of your engine I want to fly out to CA and clean up your chrome air cleaner....just sayin`... Tom
    2 points
  19. It appears to be a beautiful car under the dust. Put some air in the tires and clean it, and hope she runs. It may or may not be worth getting it to drive, but it likely would be worth getting it to start and run.
    2 points
  20. I wa Three 1935’s, but one is under restoration as we speak, two 1932’s.........and one other unnamed year for obvious reasons, and there is a twelve touring car also, and that’s all from the top of my head on 12’s........the eight list would also extend the numbers higher........Ed
    2 points
  21. Yes, I suppose it's possible. But in "totally disposable" Hollywood, I just can't see Paramount's publicity dept. shooting anyone in a 10 year old car. 😄
    2 points
  22. Someone challenged me to edit the black and white and color versions of this picture together. I was up for the challenge! I think it turned out well!
    2 points
  23. I am extremely fortunate in my choice of wife, Helen as a dedicated Francophile , hastaken charge of arranging which events we will attend, where we will stay and what we (she) want to see. Based on my experience in our previous visits to France, I am really looking forward to this years adventure.
    2 points
  24. Thanks for the welcome comments. And yes KongaMan mine has the wire wheel caps with the red, white and blue tri-shields. Hard to see in the photo.
    2 points
  25. Has anyone contacted Nicola Bulgari ?? Bet he could keep them together at his small shop ( LOL) . Bill
    2 points
  26. Even better than the Family Truckster?
    2 points
  27. Love when he climbs in a million dollar car and grinds the gears... If I was the owner, I'd throw him out on his ear!
    2 points
  28. Just saw this rare Buick factory option on Ebay. Made by Wagner for Buicks to prevent car rolling backwards on a hill. Prevents rolling backwards while starting off on a steep incline. Likely sold quite a few in San Francisco! https://www.ebay.com/itm/1941-1948-Buick-NOS-NoRol-safety-brake-hill-holding-device-1947-1946-1942/202616765345?hash=item2f2ce67ba1:g:jNwAAOSwuvpcS2yV:sc:FedExHomeDelivery!37076!US!-1&vxp=mtr&frcectupt=true
    1 point
  29. Much has been written about the importance of vetting and maintaining original survivor cars. Throughout the 90's I began to see the shocking trend of street rodding and restoring beautiful cars, which to my eyes needed nothing. In my collection I have a number of all original survivors. What become obvious, early on, was that at a car show, no matter how good they looked, they were being overlooked by the casual show goer. Even though the original paint was still as factory applied, and still shined, and the interiors were near perfect, as came from the factory, they would never look as good as a restored car. My days of having my cars judged are mostly behind me. For myself I don't care, but I thought that the cars deserved better then what they were getting. I mitigated this a bit by including the car's story when I displayed them. The response has been very gratifying. Real car people get it, all they need is to understand that they are looking at an original car, not just a poorly done restoration, from thirty years ago. I also think that more car shows should provide a place where cars of this kind, can be displayed together, and where they can be appreciated for what they are. I believe that the people with their original survivors, would benefit from a dedicated portion of the AACA form where they could post pictures and tell their stories. I think it might help to give these cars and their owners their place in the sun. What say you?-Bill
    1 point
  30. It is the custom trim level... I am not sure what the difference from the plain to custom. I have the original Buick brochure from the car, I will look in it later and see. It does have a vacuum trunk release (that count?), manual windows, bench seat in the front has a fold out arm rest / console. It needs a cup holder though... in the morning when I drive to work I am nervous putting the coffee cup on the dash. Interesting story about the first picture with the rainbow. That day my friend and I were about to head out to a small local car show to help support when it came across the radio that there was a tornado warning. Things looked pretty iffy so we decided to wait before leaving. We got a little rain (my friends new truck and his old car got the garage spots) but it cleared up and we got a nice day after. Once we got to the show we were sent a couple pictures from a friend who was out fishing on Lake Erie (about 20 minute drive away).
    1 point
  31. Jon, that’s a really interesting vehicle that I never knew existed and it looks great! One question, without a carburetor won’t it lead to your businesses demise? (Sorry, but I couldn’t resist...) Thanks again for your help on the phone yesterday, at least I think I’m more straightened out and am looking forward to getting the literature you had on my UU-2
    1 point
  32. A good example of the Gran Sport with the Gran Sport wheel covers that were part of the A9 Gran Sport option. Not too many came like this; most buyers ordered the optional Formula Five (rally) wheels in addition to the Gran Sport option. I think it's nice to see one every once in a while that's not just like everyone else's. Nothing wrong with the rally wheel, this is just different.
    1 point
  33. Hi Steve, thanks for the post. You should pop down here near the airport some Saturday. I'm at richardreau@hotmail.com.
    1 point
  34. Great color combo! Good luck and let us now how we can help. Is that a BMW 2002 in the garage? Nice as well!
    1 point
  35. Looks like the billboard to a sweet horror file...with cool cars.
    1 point
  36. Awesome! My favorite so far. Nice work. Hang this one behind the man-cave bar.
    1 point
  37. Thanks, I have already talked to Chris, he sounds very knowledgeable and professional, I will most likely ship this off to him to see if its rebuild able. thx again, peter
    1 point
  38. I have also put the armrests for the kids storage divider in, its starting to look like a proper road trip car now. All I need is a place to put the Scotch and Cigars for me! Its old, nothing matches, its looks a bit rough and beat up in places, the paint is not perfect, but it will do the job.... kinda like me..
    1 point
  39. Hi Mike, i have been following your progress from Brisbane Australia. I know a chap who builds wood spoke wheels from scratch. When he steam bends the felloe or felly he makes it in two half circles which looks like two letter U’s . As soon as they are steam formed he attaches a piece of tie wire across the ends to stop them straightening as they dry. He lets them dry and does not use them until the strain goes off the wire. This takes some weeks or months. His timber is larger than yours but I would be careful to keep the bends held in position until the timber is again fully seasoned throughout. thought this may be helpful as I could see you might move too quickly. keep up the good work I am 70 and currently restoring a 1915 Indian. cheers from Down Under Col
    1 point
  40. Even with the O ring just tight enough to hold the seals in place it tends to push the seals outer plastic housing out of shape. Not nice and square like the product drawing any longer. These seals can only work if they are pressed into a bore made to accept them. The good news is that I was able to save my stainless shaft. A quick file at the yellow(brass) ring area and crocus cloth polish has thing back in order. The brass ring area on the left side (.755) side is where the bushing seized. Every thing is now polished up again. Back to the drawing board.....
    1 point
  41. Man, I love those monsters! Wood trim too. Way to go, enjoy your new ride!
    1 point
  42. 1 point
  43. In the rush to complete the car for the Autorama deadline, I have fallen a little behind on my project updates. Let's skip the last 4 weeks of work and take a look at the car on display at the 2019 Detroit Autorama. Move-in day was Wednesday; the show opens at noon on Friday and runs unti 7pm Sunday. Larry Schramm graciously allowed me to use his enclosed trailer to move the Caballero in the slushy mess on Wednesday. I doubt his trailer has ever carried anything this heavy; we calculated teh trailer + vehicle weight at approximately 7700 pounds. 20190227_153613 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr I've never had a car in this show; it's an exciting day for me! 20190227_153554 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr We dropped the 2 cars (my Caballero and the Modified 74 Corvette) in Masterworks' spot and left as soon as possible. There are about 800 vehicles being delivered in a 36 hour window; you can't leave your tow rig in the building any longer than absolutely necessary. 20190227_170331 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr One happy guy... 0227191641.jpg.ef5664229c7ddb1571c395dabffff5ec by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr We made a last-minmute decision to make "Before" posters; Schramm to the rescue...again! 20190301_085728 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr I like the "Air Born B-58 Buick" advertising materials and logo; the decorative plate turned out great! 20190301_085756 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr Cloth pull-up sign to tell a little story and thanks the major helpers! 20190301_114915 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr Ready for Friday opening 20190301_114943 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr 20190301_115004 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr 20190301_172323 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr 20190301_172350 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr 20190301_172405 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr POM6 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr POM10 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr POM11 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr POM12 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr That's me, cleaning and preening the car. I figure I've earned the right to wear that "Authorized Valve-in-head" service shirt by now! POM18 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr POM22 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr TRh ecar drew a lot of attention. THere was almost always a small knot of 3 to 12 people checking it out and asking questions. 20190302_111636 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr Family visitors; my daughter, son-in-law and grandchildren came to check out our handiwork P1050016 by 2manycars2littletime, on Flickr I didn't win any awards with the car; the class competition (1958 - 1967 Restored) was fierce and I agreed with the judges selections of the top cars in the class. Mine was close, but not as perfect as the winners. All in all, a great weekend! I'm going to be off-line for a week. I'll add more photos when I'm back. Thanks again to Pat (BuickEstate) for his interior work, Jim P (57BuickJim) and Larry Schramm for years of hard work, support and help in bringing this baby home!
    1 point
  44. Hi Yes, three Rikers took place on the Lincoln Highway trip. Here is one of them in a bit of trouble: Recreating that journey would be quite an adventure. if you know of anybody who has a Riker I would be interested in making contact with them. Thanks Tim
    1 point
  45. Wire transfers are still the safest way to go as long as you know to whom you're sending the money. Scams aren't predicated on the wire being unsecure, they are based on the willingness of the victim to send money without doing his homework. A vast majority of fraud and scams like this would be eliminated if people would simply look before they leap like Robert did BEFORE sending the money, not after. A major component of any scam is a victim trying to get a great bargain or something he really wants and therefore they aren't really paying attention to the transactional side of the deal. If you're paying attention, you won't get scammed. The scammers aren't smarter than you, they're just counting on you to be dumb.
    1 point
  46. Here's another person who vanished as fast as he arrived........perhaps he had a welding accident? Perhaps the ROA could hire a private detective to track down all these missing persons!
    1 point
  47. As a follow-up to John's post, I also nabbed a few shots of the '57 Roadmaster coupe displayed at the Portland Nationals, 2014:
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...