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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/24/2019 in all areas

  1. Drove the 91 Buick Park Avenue up to the AACA National Meet in Ocala on Thursday, 140 difficult miles with what seemed like 96 traffic lights. She did great. At the National Show today she was awarded a National First Junior Award......weighs 8 1/2 pounds. Will drive back to Sebring, FL tomorrow, same lousy route. Driving with a purpose is what I believe in. Car has over 3400 miles on it now...will be about 3600 when I get back home.
    8 points
  2. 7 points
  3. We are pretty mild here in Southern Ontario as well, just a few degrees above zero, and the roads are clean as well. So, I drove the '41 Roadmaster out to have breakfast at a local favourite. A couple of pictures in front of the local [former] school, now a brewery restaurant, and one other business occupy it. Then I had to go and pick up supplies for tomorrow's dinner, and I took it out again, as it was still a nice day. I could driven it all day today, I think. Ran well, and not much traffic. Its' tucked away again in anticipation of the incoming storm. Keith
    5 points
  4. Took the Coupe to the AACA meeting last Sunday. Meeting was at The Pump House at White Rock Lake - old Dallas Water Department pump house.
    4 points
  5. Our local AACA Chapter took a local tour to a great BBQ Restaurant, followed by a trip by a great old fashioned Country Store. We had about 20 various cars and enjoyed a great meal and bought too many home style baked items at the Country Store. We ran into a little bit of rain but still enjoyed the day. We covered about 130 miles on the tour.
    4 points
  6. A guy should get it back to it's 20 year old look, dress up as a mob character and just drive it around It's a car that shouldn't be taken apart for a hot rod.
    3 points
  7. Couldn’t resist. This is a “cars on the coast” event held at Port Noarlunga, a southern seaside suburb with a nice bakery and parking. Was just coming from our local “coffee and cars”@ Victor Harbor, on the way to the airport. The photographer snapped the photo as I drove in, pretty late in the morning. Only Riviera there, and only Buick too!
    3 points
  8. 42 degrees in the frozen wilds of western New York right now and I just got back from a run up Main St. and back. That's about a 3 mile round trip. It has been sitting patiently since the last warm day, around the first of the year.
    3 points
  9. Thank you all. Clear now. For sure the studs have been ground off. Much appreciate you all for your help. Dave Tacheny it is. Yes, I did not secure the back part of the switch as I suspected it was coming off again. With this car it is 2 steps forward and 1 1/2 back. 😵 Thanks again.
    2 points
  10. When I was doing my 31 essex, I bought a nice trunk and when It arrived, my men asked me what I was going to do with it. I answered that I was going to put it on the back of the Essex. They said no way, that is stupid! I said, did you ever hear of the word trunk on your car? Where did you think that came from?
    2 points
  11. Actually the water analogy works very well, including check valves (diodes), pumps (batteries or other power sources), small pipe (resistors), heat exchangers (loads), Bernoulli (Kirchoff), etc, etc. At work I used the reverse analogy when describing cooling water systems to the electrical engineers on a project! "Draw the circuit" I would tell them when they couldn't understand water flow. It worked. BTW, the fuse usually protects devices and wiring downstream. I do agree it is not a barrier (like a dam), but a valve that closes when too much flow is going through it.
    2 points
  12. couple more photos from today. Mostly cleaning up around the car making a path out of the barn. Taking stock of what is there and what missing. Have to order new tubes, couldn’t get but one tire to hold air....
    2 points
  13. Ronnie makes a very good point that I overlooked, protecting the wire itself. So I'll revise my early post to a 12-15 Amp in line fuse assuming 14 gauge wire is used which would be realistic for a 6 Volt harness.
    2 points
  14. Hi, Lamar. I don't recall the repro BUICK thermometer seller's handle on eBay. If I spot one of his reproductions listed again, I'll be sure to let you know. John
    1 point
  15. I have an '18 E 45 (cover car May 2018 Bugle),.Two '38's. a 46S and a Roadmaster 81. Plus others I have had a 1910, 1031 and 1932's.
    1 point
  16. My wife wanted to do the DNA test for one of those websites but there's just no way I'm putting my DNA into some database. Even if I'm not a serial killer (as far as any of you know), I don't need anyone being able to lay their hands on any relevant information about me. Fortunately, I don't have fingerprints (seriously), so at least I don't have to worry about that little detail, but willingly giving up DNA seems ludicrous. What were we talking about again?
    1 point
  17. Here is a photo of my Accessible Systems rotisserie with pneumatic tire upgrade so you can go across unpaved surfaces without issues and also facilitate loading onto a trailer. Another one of their selling points was being built to a safety factor of 2. I believe my unit was rated at 3,500 lbs, so failure would be 7,000 lbs. Cheaper units can fail at not much above their stated rating. They were keen to point out that when you see another unit that has every right angle gusseted, that is an indication of it being of poor design and when I started looking at the hard details, the
    1 point
  18. I prefer the T-Bird over the 57 Bel Air. Just a better looking car to me. I haven't driven one in more than a decade, but even longer than that for a 57 Chevy. Last time I looked at buying a baby Bird I had the chance to drive a 7 yr old 2002 T-Bird. Bought it instead. At least I could drive it on those 90 % humidity 90 degree days!
    1 point
  19. I have never seen a red Stutz engine so I'm not so sure about that. Maybe Jason can comment. I'll admit that on the list of things to do, I wouldn't make painting the engine a priority. Stutz is a great marque and even the Blackhawk is considered a full CCCA Classic. That means it is welcome at all Classic Car Club of America events and would be great to see. That engine with the OHC is about as cool a six banger as you will see in a prewar car.
    1 point
  20. You know me too well, Doug. It is a break wall at Erieau, On and protects the commercial fishing boats which harbour in Rondeau Bay from the lake. Last fall Bev and Ihad a one day tour with lunch at Erieau, a drive to the point at Rondeau Provincial Park then a drive home through the fall foliage of Sinclair Bush with 6 or 7 cars from the London area. Regards, Gary
    1 point
  21. Please find a scan of the pages in the preliminary service information of Cadillac regarding the blue dot tail light Johan
    1 point
  22. I know of one automaker that for factory installed trunks used elevator bolts through the trunk floor. The bolt heads sit flush and a matching piece of trunk lining material was glued over the head of the bolt. https://www.grainger.com/category/fasteners/bolts/elevator-bolts
    1 point
  23. 1 point
  24. Paul Sr & Paul Jr of Orange County Choppers with their new shared project Roadmaster
    1 point
  25. It is a set of points if that is a cam I see inside. It is about the right size for a magneto. Maybe check with Marks Magnetos or one of the other magneto guys to see if they recognize what it goes to.
    1 point
  26. If they aren’t going down, you are ahead of the curve! My talent is dumping cars just before they become “hot”
    1 point
  27. I sure miss that Carolina B-B-Q. Nice bunch of cars. Ben
    1 point
  28. Sorry for the delay in the Merc progress. I really haven't done much. The weather here has been horrid. It's been colder and wetter than normal to the point I can't get anything done. Just yesterday we got hit with 7" of snow which tops our total snow fall at 13" in a month and a half period. That's the most snow I have ever seen in our area. I did manage to get the trunk hinges on and started removing the old drip edge seam sealer. I still have to scrape off the old sealer that is on the underside of the roof drip edge. Looking into getting a temp structure so I can be out of the weath
    1 point
  29. If it's any help, here's a 1933 Cadillac club sedan I had a few years ago and it does indeed have blue dot taillights. This car was also a multiple first prize winner in a variety of clubs. I also have the car's build sheet, although it does not show anything about the taillight lenses. I'm inclined to believe they're correct.
    1 point
  30. I told the exhaust guy I wanted it QUIET. He obliged.
    1 point
  31. I have the feeling there are quite a few more of these gauges around than Stutz cars that need them. They make a great décor piece, but for most people not something to pay over $100.00 for. The Gauges themselves are nice . U.S. gauge was a high quality maker. They made this same gauge with quite a few different makes engraved on the face, usually reasonably high quality cars. But it is one of those parts that people saved when the car was junked and today are not all that uncommon. I have several myself including 2 or 3 Stutz engraved ones. I don't think I ever paid more than $50.00 or
    1 point
  32. Seeing as you have the patience you might like to study this. I am afraid my eyes began to glaze over after a while..... http://sffsymposium.engr.utexas.edu/Manuscripts/2013/2013-66-Snelling.pdf
    1 point
  33. There is no question that excellent patterns can be made with 3D printing. If you search on Terry Harper's posts on his Wisconsin engine you'll see some amazing patterns made this way. That said, I agree with R. White that it is unlikely you can't find a modern piston that will work. I am making the Mitchell pistons because they have a very unusual compression height. If that weren't the case, I'd have looked for an "off the shelf" alternative. The reservation about 3D printing is that it can easily be just as time consuming and just as expensive as making the patterns of wood alth
    1 point
  34. racked and stacked maybe... lot of work went into that baby!!!
    1 point
  35. Pretty sure I saw a bow tie, so didn't give it any more attention, so maybe a Chevy Monza?
    1 point
  36. Last Tuesday I had a visit from an American friend I met on this forum. Joe Puleo, from Rhode Island, USA, is on the right in the photo and it is me on the left. Joe took the time out of his UK trip to travel the 5-hours up to Norfolk to visit. I met Joe by following his posts of the work he is doing on his 1911 Mitchell. If you have not seen his posts they are well worth following. His machining work is amazing and he has taught me a lot. As Joe stayed the night we had a very good natter. Many thanks Joe for taking the time to visit.
    1 point
  37. In 1957, Chevrolet was outsold by Ford, outstyled by Chrysler and outpowered by both (Ford offered a 300 hp supercharged engine...which was about as common as Chevy's 283 hp engine...which was not very.) I say this not to insult anyone's car, but to remind folks that (aside from the Corvette) Chevy was the bottom of the line for GM. In other words, a pretty ordinary car. Ford was also bottom of the line, but the T-Bird - like Chevy's Corvette - was something special and unique. I just get tired of the mythology surrounding tri 5 Chevy's...that they changed the automotive world or something. Th
    1 point
  38. If you are taller than 5'10" skip the T-Bird. Also worth noting that you can get you any year, any color, almost any options 2-seat 'Bird in very good condition for $30-35,000.
    1 point
  39. I have a new Nick Name! A guy I have known for years saw a photo of “One bid” next to my computer desk at work. He then proceeded to call me “Two Tone Malone!” LoL
    1 point
  40. Yes, the whole rear of the body tilts back and the top folds under it. Brunn called it a Riviera phaeton. Three were built I believe, and all three exist. The tan car pictured above was originally black, and was a staple at early Northern & Central Ohio AACA, VMCCA, and CCCA events in the 1950's & 60's. BC Hartline painted it tan in the 50's sometime, and he used to drive the hell out of it too. It was not a trailer queen. It still had the original brown leather interior in it last time I saw it.
    1 point
  41. Great result today as the Reatta took first in class. Detailed to the max and showed like a dream. I met Terry Kenney today as well. He was a Reatta designer, engineer and help put together the Craft Centre. It was great talking to him and he added many insights that I did not know. He would be a great guest as a national meet or Reatta get together.
    1 point
  42. I'll be gone a month but when I get back I have the Baltimore Gun Show so I'm home about one weekend from now until mid-March. I have a lot of work to do in the British National Archives for the book I'm writing - a project that has been going on for 30 years and is finally coming to a conclusion. I am hoping to get over to Norfolk and visit the 1914 Humberete!
    1 point
  43. Sounds like an unfixable title problem, dating back three generations.
    1 point
  44. Well, that looks like a great place to market the Alvis. Unfortunately, I registered and entered an ad on December 20th and my account still shows the ad publishing status as "pending." Perhaps the person who approves new accounts has been on holiday. I will attempt to make contact now that said holidays have passed. Anyway, thanks Bernie. As a side benefit, I have enjoyed reading about some of your recent adventures and projects so I will be checking back here at the British forum more often. The Alvis is not mine - posting for a relative - but I do have a Series 2 E-Type FHC:
    1 point
  45. Its been awhile but I thought I would share the end results. Here we have the completed patterns and core boxes. This was a set of patterns I simply dreaded fabricating. In fact I am glad I procrastinated because I am sure I would have had a very difficult time fabricating these by hand out of wood. I am sure it can be done but not with my skill level or thin wallet! As you can see we have a four piece pattern plus a follower and two core boxes. Once I had the prints I went over them with sand paper and filler followed by a two coats of primer and a top coat. T
    1 point
  46. love this, doing some of this on my 1929 Chevrolet I am restoring. needed a spacer, none available, designed it up in CAD, 3D printed a few of various thickness and then test fitted. few other parts I am working on as well I do a LOT in CAD, when i have to make a new gasket I digitize the original, then i can print a paper 1 : 1 and trace out on material. this way IF a gasket is detroyed I have a digital file to recreate it no worries. Technology is Grand when you use it for resourceful reasons !! now to 3d print the parts i need and find a guy l
    1 point
  47. That is very true. One thing to remember is that there is a fairly large community out there of folks with "backyard foundries" These are a mix hobbyists and professionals who cast metal for the challenge, fun and their own projects. Most are very willing to to share their expertise and knowledge. Here is a link to a forum which is a great place to contact these folks through. http://www.alloyavenue.com/vb/forum.php In fact most of the casting I have had done are by a gentleman with just such a setup. He and his wife sell crafts at various venues and he c
    1 point
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