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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/03/2019 in all areas

  1. I’m a millennial. Born in 1989 (Just turned 30) my first classic was a 1959 Edsel, now a proud owner of a 1926 Dodge Brothers. My dad is the one (born in 1963) always asking me why I didn’t just buy a muscle car. I tell him I don’t like muscle cars and he looks at me like I’m committing a sin. I like going against the grain and doing what I love. And I genuinely love my 26. People like me may be one in 100 or even one in 1000000, but I we are out there and trying to smash those stereotypes.
    7 points
  2. Well, besides buying a new Enclave Avenir last week I got a call from Summit Racing regional warehouse and retail store in Arlington, TX. Summit asked me to bring my 1967 Sportwagon GS400 Tribute car to put on one of their two turntables as you walk into the entrance of the retail store. Car will be there for the month of February and get lots of looks. We loaded it on the turntable and I was not finished opening the doors, hood and tailgate when I turned around there were about 8 people standing there admiring the car and full of questions. The black paint really pops in t
    6 points
  3. From the net- It's a window mounted automobile air cooling unit. To cool the air it used a process known as latent cooling of vaporization, in other words, cooling by water evaporation. Water inside the cooler evaporates and in the process transfers heat from the surrounding air to evaporate the water, giving in return cool moisture-laden air inside. The lower the humidity, the better it works. Because of the dry desert air, they were popular in the southwestern US in areas like California, Arizona, West Texas, New Mexico and Nevada, or anyone traveling through those areas. They w
    5 points
  4. Lots of great advice in this thread so far. Some thoughts... Slipped belts on tires: You can often see this from across a parking lot if you know exactly what it looks like. Back in the days when radials first became popular, you would hear about bizarre "pulls" and such caused by slipped belts. Maybe. I haven't run across a slipped belt in decades that couldn't be seen with the car on a hoist. Jack it up a wheel at a time (assuming you don't have access to a hoist) and turn each wheel while watching. While looking from the outside in, across the tread, look for runout.
    4 points
  5. Our Grand Puppy stopped by for a visit. Little did Roxy know that she would be sanding on the old Buick front fender. By the look on her face I don’t think she’s really into it!
    4 points
  6. I completely agree, and can relate. My dryer is 45 years old. My washing machine is 20 years old. My newest car is 16 years old. Stove is 22 years old. Water heater is 22 years old. I don't golf. I don't smoke. I don't buy $8 coffees from Starbucks. Almost every single thing that needs fixing in the house is done by me. I don't mean this to sound pompous, but you can save a TON of money this way. A new car? Are you kidding me? There may be a LOT of reasons to buy a new car, but none have anything to do with good investment.
    4 points
  7. My dads 1915 First Series Twin Six Packard at Pieks Airport San Diego Ca. about 1954. John
    3 points
  8. or post caps maybe😁 only need about 80 more🤣 Thanks @TN2Lane 👍
    3 points
  9. You can get the "crank rod" out by knocking the front pin out. That shaft will then slide out so you can replace the sheared off pin. That pin on my parts engine is bent and will be re-placed. On my '18 all 4 rings are "compression" - no oil control ring. I dont know if yours is the same. My parts book says that they were all the same. I go along with Hubert. Pull the pistons. You have already done most of the work. And at this point piston removal and replacement is easy .Chances are really good that if you dont replace the rings, you'll have an oil burner / smoker / p
    3 points
  10. I’m going the cheap route, I’m using 2 layers of roof paper for floor insulation to imitate the factory originals. I was concern about the smell residue but to my surprise, no smell at all, besides carpet comes with padded jute.
    3 points
  11. G=Great R=Riviera G is shifting console R is rear seat speaker
    3 points
  12. Ben, I will be serious now. Have you checked the tires? A loose belt on a radial can do strange things. A break in a bias can be just as strange. Ben
    3 points
  13. Hey John, no worries on the embarrassment. I'm proud to say I have a 20+ year old Verizon flip phone. I can text, but I never do. I can takes pictures, I seldom do. It receives text messages, receives voice mail, tells me the time and date and has a calendar, and it probably has some other stuff which I don't use. It does a great job and does all I need. I have no land line, I carry it when I'm out and use it all the time and It's still on it's original battery. Speaking of refrigerators; A good friend of mine that's into antique everything, house, car, furniture etc. has a 1952 P
    3 points
  14. Considering "under load/uphill" and "cornering", wondering about any rear suspension bushings that might be allowing the rear axle to shift on its pivot points? If it's all "straight line", then loading the engine with the foot brake with more throttle to maintain speed should indicate that, possibly. When the front u-joint on our '66 Chrysler started going away, it was a light vibration at 70mph that happened. Not unlike a wheel/tire that needed balancing. But also accompanied by squeaks when starting from a stop. With everything in dedicated architecture in the tor
    3 points
  15. This is the Buick that inspired my love for the marque - my parent's 61 Electra 225 that they bought in 62 after trading their 57 Roadmaster 75. Because of this car, I now also own 61 deuce and a quarter that I can't imagine ever selling... also shown in one of these pictures is my uncle's 62 Chevy Impala!
    3 points
  16. When I was a kid the old timers would call me to see of I wanted their old cars or parts collections before they moved South. I wound up with all the local stuff over the years. I feel sorry for the young people now that will never know what it was like to go for a weekend drive looking for old cars & parts. Sure, American Pickers gives you some idea of what it was like, but the real thing was fantastic while it lasted. Bob
    2 points
  17. No Gran Sport (GS) in 1964. But there was an A8 coded engine option - Super Wildcat w/ dual four barrel carbs. Production code for that engine in 1964 was KX, which will be found stamped on the machined surface - passenger's side - where the valley cover sits. The Engine Serial number, which will be stamped on the machined surface on the driver's side, will match the vehicle's VIN. The illustration below shows a Production Code Number - M = 1966, T=401 (the other numbers are inconsequential, they have to do with shift identification) Engine Serial Number - 464376H100001
    2 points
  18. I just saw this car on the street again and am shocked that it hasn't sold. It is a desireable Series 78 Deluxe Club Coupe with a 257 cu Straight 8 that appears eminently restorable. The asking price is already in the neighborhood of "reasonable," and I'd expect the owner to deal at this point. It is also centrally situated in a Mid-Atlantic city, which is a boon to those of us who have to factor in transport costs in the true "cost to own." See https://washingtondc.craigslist.org/doc/cto/d/washington-1948-oldsmobile-club-sedan/6810382246.html Not mine but I wish i
    2 points
  19. Chistech, if you wish, you can repair the "autocorrect" in you heading. Place your pointer in that line and repair the reference to the Edsel/WWII Warbird - it happens to most of us at one time or another. We've had several Corvairs, and currently enjoy our 1965 Monza 4-speed convertible. They are a pleasure to drive, condsidered the American Porsche, and easy to work on. Good luck with your purchase.
    2 points
  20. Here's my 32 Buick brochure....has a stamp on the front from the 1932 Chicago Auto Show.
    2 points
  21. I sent this to my friend Chris (Car Guy). This was his response...... (Make sure she blocks at a forty five degree angle, most dogs and some cats tend to sand in the same spot to long creating ridges and low areas) 😂
    2 points
  22. That car has been for sale on Hemmings for quite some time. Dont walk away, RUN !
    2 points
  23. Carl, Gary, All good now. I know which trashed wire goes were for now. Appreciate your time. Dave
    2 points
  24. Black walls in front, whitewalls in back, for when you can't decide! 😄
    2 points
  25. Youse guys are all wrong. 😁 Except John.... Real GM part that fits Corvair and Corvette. You are missing the special bolt or nut to make this lock a tire. The bolt type was used on 61-64 Corvairs. The nut type was used on 1965 - 69 Corvairs. I do not know the Corvette years. http://corvaircenter.com/phorum/read.php?1,813643 Of course, it could be an old part in the system that was reused for Corvair and Corvette production. Seen that before, like the Carter YH used on Turbo Corvairs. Last used by GM on Corvettes 8 years earlier.
    2 points
  26. Gary, dosen`t sound right to me, float level too high or trash in the needle and seat not shutting off the flow. Fuel should not be as high as those top gaskets and should not be wet. Remove the screw on the left side of the carb., fuel level should be right at the bottom of the hole, if fuel comes out when you remove the screw, fuel level is too high. Even with the engine running you should be able to remove the screw and fuel not run out the hole. The leak up top by shaft and clip looks like it could be oil/lube from that shaft, if you`ll look at the little cap cover it states to remove the
    2 points
  27. put it all together or fitment. i am pretty happy with itanyone see anything wrong ??once it is good will have the bracket blasted, primed & painted then the crossbars stripped and chromed. front bumper assembled top down view looking head on, only used center medallion for test fitting, also used OLD hardware close up of the center portion of bracket, crossbars and medallion test fir on the front end, looks and fits great. equal on both sides and clear tires
    2 points
  28. Next I dived into the crank receptacle to see why the crank has always just sliped off when I try to crank the engine or just turn slow and do nothing. After jacking the front of the engine a bit, I removed the timing gear cover. To my surprise the nut on the end of the crankshaft looked Ok. When I looked inside the cover, I could see that the pin used to engage the crankshaft nut had been bent off and broken off inside the cover. It appears as someone must have put some serious pressure on the crank trying to unfreeze this engine before I got it.
    2 points
  29. Grand Opening of Mustang Ranch?
    2 points
  30. “Yep, she’s a beaut Clark, a real beaut” “but the remote door locks don’t seem to be working”
    2 points
  31. I'm 82, have a '14 Model T, a '12 Buick, an '11 Stanley Steamer, and an '07 single-cylinder Cadillac. I drive them frequently and give rides to anyone who wants one (which means just about everybody). The neighbors already think I'm a complete weirdo!
    2 points
  32. Well I am into 1940s and 1970s and some 1980s luxury cars. This is mostly due to the fact that this is what I grew up around with my WWII grandfather born in 1916. The earlier cars don’t do much for me because sadly they can’t be enjoyed here in ca due to the insane traffic (I only take my 21 out twice a year) even my forties cars have a hard time so they don’t get out much but they are started weekly. 50s cars do nothing for me except the 58 imperial and the Mark II. 60s cars are so common and not exciting (I own a 66 mustang which was my first car). My tastes now in car buying are luxury 70s
    1 point
  33. My first guesses are ICM or CPS. Second. If you have used fuel treatments such as seafoam or a few others, I would replace the O2 sensor. Many times they don't send a code.
    1 point
  34. 1 point
  35. I have used ceramic coating from M&R Performance Coatings in Kodak, TN on exhaust manifolds on cars from 1915 to 1972. They offer a "cast iron gray" color, as well as blacks and bright silver. After up to 9 years, I have had no negative issues with either the appearance or functionality, and plan to use on my current project. Comments above are true; the coating will not fill or hide any defects on the surface.
    1 point
  36. The grass isn’t always greener, especially when the powersource is: German household power prices at record high -Verivox Germany’s Economic Backbone Suffers From Soaring Power Prices
    1 point
  37. She doesn't mind but she's also apprehensive to me spending money right now all things considered.
    1 point
  38. According to the Jan/Feb 2019 Antique Automobile Magazine, the Auburn, IN National is listed as May 28-30, 2020. I would recommend that you double check this date late this year or early 2020 just to be safe. Charlie
    1 point
  39. Today I took the plunge and broke into my rocker panels. Here's the passenger side before (Photo 1) and after (Photo 2). Not having a proper spot weld remover, I just cut the metal as close as I could to the spot welded areas. I will either buy a spot weld driller-outer, or maybe just grind the other pieces out. Not sure yet. Here's the driver's side after I cut the rocker out there (Photo 3). The inner sills have rust holes, but it doesn't look too bad at first glance. My plan is to stop with the body, other than continuing to remove what's left of the paint, and wait unti
    1 point
  40. 1 point
  41. Some more info here: https://www.v8buick.com/index.php?threads/9-3-8-rear-differences.71740/ As others stated, the only parts that interchange with 9 3/8 is other 9 3/8. The only market is used except for a stray NOS piece here and there... Personally I wouldn't go through the work to change an existing rear from 3.07 to 3.23. Not enough noticeable difference and anytime you change gears in a rear like this you need the specialty tools for setting pinion depth. You might be better off looking for an entire differential with posi and gears you like.
    1 point
  42. 1 point
  43. Just keep the points and condenser in the glove box. I can't tell you how many drivers find themselves stranded. I said to a friend who's 64, 409 Impala SS went dead on the HYW " What did you do with the Pertronic's ?" He said he had by chance saved the points and condenser and he threw the pertronic's as far as he could from the side of the road.
    1 point
  44. We are at a point here where we ABSOLUTELY MUST HAVE MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THIS CAR. There is a possibility that the existing interior can and actually SHOULD be used as is and preserved. Looking across the front seat, even the drivers side MAY still be totally intact !! Well then, IS IT ? AND : WHAT ABOUT THE REST OF THE INTERIOR ? All hardware seems to be present WHERE YOU CAN KINDA' SEE IT. What about the structural wood ? What about the wood spokes ? AND HOW WELL DID IT RUN ; HOW RECENTLY ? DE SOTO has been here on AACA forums for a good long time. From reading his postings,
    1 point
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