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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/02/2019 in all areas

  1. So when we are talking artwork, everybody knows who the old masters are what their paintings represent. Here is a hint, its not a bunch of dogs playing poker. In the car world, big "C" Classic means something too, and it isn't an 84 Buick Skyhawk. Too me, almost everything built after 1972 is a group of dogs playing poker. Talking about big C Classics and 1980s anything in the same breadth is just wrong. I would love a Sonnet III, 73-4 SS454, 80 Z28 350/4speed, 78 W6 Trans-Am, etc. One of these days I might stumble on to the right car and own one and will be thrilled, but I will never use the word classic to describe any one of them.
    5 points
  2. I'm in my mid-40s, and I hope that I get to live to a time when almost every car on the road is a self-driving electric car powered by solar-generated energy. I hope gasoline stations are hard to find, having any gas-powered car is an oddity, and driving around in a 1935 Packard is considered so eccentric as to border on the bizarre. It will be a good thing for the environment, and for the long term sustainability of the planet. All for the good. Our cars probably won't be worth much by then. Collecting them will probably be an unusual and wholly impractical hobby. With that said, I hope to be that eccentric character with a big garage filled with 1930s cars anyway, and I hope to fire up a 30s convertible, head out on the road, and enjoy every minute of it even if the neighbors think I'm a complete weirdo.
    5 points
  3. This is the Buick that inspired my love for the marque - my parent's 61 Electra 225 that they bought in 62 after trading their 57 Roadmaster 75. Because of this car, I now also own 61 deuce and a quarter that I can't imagine ever selling... also shown in one of these pictures is my uncle's 62 Chevy Impala!
    5 points
  4. I’m born in 1966 and absolutely nothing post war interests me. I like rare and unusual motor cars......and that doesn’t necessarily mean expensive. I have a 1915 HCCA car that runs and drives great, unmolested and fine......and it was less than 15k four years ago. Lots of fun, very little expense. I would prefer to drive a 1930’s Duesenberg Supercharged speedster, but currently I am short about seven to eight million for the purchase.
    5 points
  5. Most prewar friends I have made in the past say, five years are younger than me at 55. Some significantly younger. I enjoy their company as well as older friends about the same. Meanwhile dad, age 80 appreciates the 14 T and 30 A but gravitates to postwar 46 to say 58 or so. Some of his friends like older stuff, some musce cars. Pursue what interests you, and like minded folks will surface naturally.
    4 points
  6. I'm 82, have a '14 Model T, a '12 Buick, an '11 Stanley Steamer, and an '07 single-cylinder Cadillac. I drive them frequently and give rides to anyone who wants one (which means just about everybody). The neighbors already think I'm a complete weirdo!
    4 points
  7. I’m within months of Edinmass in age, December 65, at one time I thought an early Mustang would be my thing but after driving them in high school I wasn’t a fan. Dad always had an American Austin and a few Model T’s... my first true antique car was a 24 Studebaker Touring. I have owned 4 Model T’s dating from 1915 to 1926, a 23 Bay State (a Long story, my bad pun was intended for those who get it) and 2 Model A’s. As a matter of fact until a couple weeks ago all of my cars were pre 1930 even though the Mustang is my generational expectation. Thanks to the encouragement and advice from Edinmass and Trimacar here on the Forum, my newest adventure is a 31 Pierce Arrow. If I had the money I would have a Stutz, a Brewster, a Cord, or a Dusey too... there’s no rhyme or rhythm to what someone likes, must be my bad taste. I can appreciate the lack of disposable income, but not all the doomsday predictions for the hobby, that is just being sensationalized to sell more magazines IMO
    4 points
  8. I completely agree, and can relate. My dryer is 45 years old. My washing machine is 20 years old. My newest car is 16 years old. Stove is 22 years old. Water heater is 22 years old. I don't golf. I don't smoke. I don't buy $8 coffees from Starbucks. Almost every single thing that needs fixing in the house is done by me. I don't mean this to sound pompous, but you can save a TON of money this way. A new car? Are you kidding me? There may be a LOT of reasons to buy a new car, but none have anything to do with good investment.
    3 points
  9. It all depends on where you live. Some areas have a very high cost of living. Like where I live, now rated the second most unaffordable location on the planet. Very high prices and wages definitely low. Many billions $ of cash have moved in from out of the country, very few locals can match that sort of influx. Sell and move ? Where to ? What about aging parents and kids just starting out ? Relocate away from a lifetime of friends and car hobby connections ? Very few Western Canadian locations are better so what are you gaining ? All the smaller spots are nearly as expensive or are resource oriented economies with even higher costs. Pull up stakes and start over in my 60's on the other side of the continent [ I have lived here since 1967]? Homes locally are very expensive but that is just the tip of the iceberg. Almost everything else is as well. I live a very frugal life, small cheap car, no cell phone at all, had a reasonably decent job for this region up to my retirement but hobby $ have always been a real struggle. Greg in Canada
    3 points
  10. Roger, That is looking really good. I may be getting close to doing upholstery and top on my 1925 Buick Standard Touring in the near future, so any pointers would be very helpful. I would bet that we have the same front seat. I will look into that. I put together an upholstery package because my plan is to essentially have an original style interior made. Maybe get some volume pricing. High volume for old Buicks is 2 or more right? I am posting what is needed for the front seat. I do have a similar file for the rear seat of a Touring car if someone needs that. I also have information on what your door covering should look like. I do have some convertible top information as well. Are you aware that there is a sheetmetal piece sewn into the top material that fits between the top frame and the glass frame? If you are, I would love to get dimensions from you on this. Otherwise I have some photos of what it looks like if you need it. Most of this came from my experts - Leif Holmberg and Larry DiBarry. My car won't make the show, but I hope your does. Your car looks great. Hugh
    3 points
  11. I cant. People dispose of their money all the time in terrible ways. They buy new appliances every 2 years, new phones every year, new cars every few years. If people who complain about not having disposable income had any sense about how to manage what they had, they could collect cars too. They choose to spend it in other ways trying to impress themselves. Daily driving the same car since 2005, having a (God forbid!) iPhone 5, and fixing my 5 year old stove for $12 allows me to have 2 collector cars. If a person wants to be involved in the hobby, they can. I guess that’s it. People would rather spend their money on other things. There is nothing wrong with that. We all have our hobbies and interests. What’s wrong is doing that, and then complaining about being unable to have a collector car. Either make more money and buy and old car, or make different decisions. Sorry for the diatribe. I just know a few people like this, and I meet people like this at work every day. They are always “broke,” but spend endlessly.
    3 points
  12. And what about seats, trim and, for example, the steering wheel? Well, with a convertible top not exactly perfect, the leather was hard like cardboard. At least, the hardware was there and could be rescued. I don’t remember if the seat would move electrically; I remember that I had to replace at least one spinning nut. The steering wheel was cracked and bits missing. Anyway, the shape of the inside was not immediately the main problem, the rust was.
    3 points
  13. I'm another oddball. Born in 74. Could pretty much care less for anything from the mid 70's up and really have little interest in Muscle cars. I can appreciate anything that is super clean and well taken care of, even a smogged to death 70's land barge, more because it was cared for which makes it an exception, not because it is the end of all of styling and engineering. My interest falls primarily pre 62 and gets greater the further you go back. I was seriously considering a 1914 Cadillac a couple of years ago. I'm really starting to like the sportier 20's big cars. You know those dinosaurs nobody alive ever had or wanted that seem to have price tags of 100G on them and selling for that. My garage right now has a mix. A 50's style 32 ford Highboy I built before I was 25, A second 32 Highboy I bought 20 years ago that is basically a nicely preserved 50's drag car. A 56 Olds 2 door hardtop I drove to High school, a 40 Ford Coupe (stock) a 47 Hudson pickup and a 36 Cord phaeton. Soon hope to get a 31-33 Auburn. Cars I had in the last 10 years include a 57 chevy sedan, 40 Chevy sedan, 29 Model A, 48 Chevy Fleetline, 36 Chrysler convertible, 50 Cadillac Sedan, 48 Cadillac Fastback, 48 Plymouth Convertible, 60 Corvette, 60 Chrysler, 49 Chevy Pickup, 59 Tbird Convertible, 1949 Mercury coupe, 57 Tbird, so you can see I'm pretty much all over the place. I've looked at alot of 30's cars, just couldn't make the deal happen on them. Wish I had the money for the 28 Stutz on Hemmings right now.
    3 points
  14. Not looking to bad from this perspective eh Yung Mi. by daughter Arrie , the day I brought Rosie aka La Carrera home from Kansas City.
    3 points
  15. You buy, own and enjoy the cars from an era you like, no one says you have to do a thing else than that. Im from 1952, not much difference in age and I’m not a big fan of the muscle cars either. Too much hype over them. I am also not a big fan of Model Ts, they are interesting from a historical standpoint but not really my cup of “T” as a collectible car. Too old and way too slow. Still, I respect you for your choices and interests. That’s what makes the world great. My son likes foreign cars from the 1980s, me not so much but it’s his choice their too. Enjoy the hobby!
    3 points
  16. Born in 1950, spent the day at the local ANTIQUE car show when I was ten years old, it had a cut off date for cars made in 1942 or before, it was the foundation for my life in the hobby. REALLY tired of be preached to about accepting 25 year old crap as "classic". Never was a Walmart shopper, but drove by their parking lots that some people want to recreate as car shows. I was restoring a Model T Ford all through the Muscle Car era, NEVER went into a show room to look at one much less had any desire to own one. Cars of my youth are still the cars of my dreams, so glad to see them at Pebble Beach. Hershey swap meet will be 50 in a row for me, may stay for the show this year to see the 50-75 cars that matter to me. Bob
    3 points
  17. I was born in 1946! Damn I’m old. I like prewar back to the early 30’s. Any British sports car no matter the age ( I must be like Lucas, not always the brightest) and anything in the 50’s and 60’s. I would love to be able to afford a 38 Packard V12 anything but can’t. I’ve rebuilt MG’s Healy’s, Ford pickups from 49 and early 70’s. I am an early boomer, married a girl older than me 48 years ago. I’m just me, so I don’t fit a general category and I like it like that. Have fun Dave S
    3 points
  18. We are working on getting dad's 27 Standard roadster to the Oklahoma show. Paint is done and we are almost ready for upholstery and top. He has owned this car since 1952 and is BCA #99. Hope to see all of you there.
    2 points
  19. Greg, that all makes sense to me. Certainly different markets and regions have different economical factors than others. My basic point is still, a person chooses how to spend their money, but when they spend it all irresponsibly and then complain about being broke, I’m not listening. Few of of us fall into that group, as we are able to participate if our loved hobby, whether because we are responsible, well off, or both. That’s what makes coming here quite refreshing. I’m probably messing that up by talking about budgeting lol.
    2 points
  20. Well guess what? I am the new owner of the Imperial! Got it for 2k runs great!!! Needs the ac fixed and the power window my suspension guy says he has to adjust the torsion bar. Needs new tires.
    2 points
  21. or should this be in Find the Buick 😁 judgin by the the wheel covers I’m thinking there’s a fitty fo convertible under there somewheres
    2 points
  22. While there is probably some truth to want it now generation generalization, I think West is more on the mark. The middle class today often has less "disposable income" than it did say 25 - 40 years ago. And at the same time even a largely owner done old car "fix up " {as opposed to a true restoration because we all know how much that would cost} has become quite a bit more expensive. Something has to give and from my point of view it seems there are fewer middle class people involved with middle class hobby cars. The interest is seemingly still there it's just the shop space, tools , and basic old car expenses that are limiting involvement. All the car cruise ins Cars and Coffee, shows seem to be as popular as ever, But without a ongoing hobby project the people then don't develop the old car hobby skills as it rarely comes from other life activities anymore { nobody fixes things much anymore} . The high end seems as buoyant as ever, its the formerly mass participation middle that seems to be aging out of existence. Greg in Canada Greg in Canada
    2 points
  23. Once again, a few people inadvertently insult the newer and younger members with newer cars. And it hurts the AACA. PLEASE READ STEVE MOSKOWITZ'S EDITORIAL ON PAGE 8 OF THE CURRENT JANUARY-FEBRUARY ISSUE. Here's an excerpt for consideration: (And consideration of others is always good!) "So why in the world would any member find it necessary to find fault with someone else enjoying a postwar car, four-door or maybe some vehicle that is not hugely collectible in the eyes of many? Why? I am sure most of our parents told us, 'If you don't have anything good to say, don't say anything at all.' That seems to fit here. I would never suggest that someone does not have the right to their feelings or to express them, but why hurt someone else's?" I know the people loving the early cars are probably usually kind. They just don't realize what their critical comments can do.
    2 points
  24. I'm not quite sure that the engine cradles would have been similar. The Northstar was a V8 vs. Reatta having a V6. 1993 was the last year of Allante production and the only year with the Northstar V8. Prior years the Allante was equipped with the 4.5L V8. Just saying...
    2 points
  25. Ha -- yeah, that's the BEST part! This 430 get amazing mileage!!! (I did notice that, by the way...) Not too surprising though, since I generally try to keep it between 1/2 and Full.
    2 points
  26. Thanks for the thoughts on shifting early cars. Interesting stuff. I recently read a good book about Harley Earl called Fins by William Knoedelseder. In the book there was this passage that talked about the fine sound of Pierce-Arrows. And below are a couple of advertisements for the Pierce-Arrow. One of Harley Earl's hires—after he was appointed in 1928 by Alfred Sloan as the head of GM's new "Art and Colour Section" (a name Earl didn't like)—was Frank Hershey, whose affluent mother had purchased custom cars designed by Harley Earl. Frank Hershey was an influential car designer for decades, and helped design the 1949 Cadillac fin, and helped design Ford's 1955 Thunderbird. Earl liked designers who, in his words, "had gasoline in their veins"—and Hershey fit that. For instance, Hershey could identify almost any car of the 1920s just by their sounds, as he remembered in an interview in the 1990s a few years before he died.... "The Marmon had a hollow, spooky sound, partly because because they didn't have any louvers in the hood, Studebakers were distinctive because their rear axles whined all the time. The Pierce-Arrow had a swishing sound, sort of like it was riding on water, almost like steam, it was so quiet. And I could always tell a Cadillac because they sounded like the valves needed adjusting." The advertising copy for that Peerless car ad above is strangely wistful. Since it's impossible to read the ad without clicking on it to enlarge it multiple times, I'll type some of it here just in case someone might be interested. "....Up Life's winding course, regret pursues change and change bites the heels of habit and custom. The stage-coach of romance gives place to steam and speed. The electric light snuffs out the soft-beamed candle. Tinkling sleigh-bells drown in the roar of motor horns. But Youth knows naught of the old, Age accepts the new, and who will say that smiles were brighter or spirits keener at the Christmases of our fathers than they are today? Richer and wider is our modern life, with its locomotives, its electricity, its motor cars—they have extended our horizons, increased our comforts and opportunities, multiplied our human relationships. Here at the Peerless factory we measure our accomplishment by the degree to which the Peerless Two-power-range Eight shares in this widening and enriching process. As the new year approaches, we renew our pledges of devotion to ideals of sound building and honest dealing. The Peerless Motor Car Company CLEVELAND : OHIO"
    2 points
  27. Contrary to the popular all the old cars are dieing because nobody wants them cheer, I think there is a much larger number of people out there interested in old cars, even these from what I have seen selling, than we are led to believe. The mainstream folks keep telling everybody excess is bad and we need to live in a tiny house and have nothing to be happy, we need to forget history because, well it's in the past. When that latest rave drops off and people realize it isn't bad to lust after something and there is a desire back to work with one's hands, which will be harder and harder with newer cars you will see the market correcting some then going up again. I'm sure this is not what alot of guys dream of finding, but then again most have never seen one. It only takes a few guys as there are probably only a few examples available to keep them alive. Remember every flood, Hurricane, tornado, Forest fire or export to a third world country leaves one less. I still stand by 5G. Get it running and driving and maybe 7500. If I was closer I would take a look. The problem is I tack 2500 right off the bat if I were to persue it. Do you have the headlights? Is the wood good?
    2 points
  28. Worked a little more on the cutting jig. I had a couple pieces of hard nylon from work that I milled to the thickness of the slots leaving the thickness of the nylon sides to the inside. This allowed me to mill a 1/2” slot in the middle for the cutter and holder and two slots on the ends that will secure the ends so the whole jig is straight and strong. I milled a slot on each side which will allow for height adjustment of the cutter holder. Hope to get more done tomorrow. The concept of this tool is to operate it much-like a file. With the cutter in the middle of the long sides, it should be able to produce good straight lines but only testing will prove it.
    2 points
  29. I am from the tail end of the boomers. The cars I was first interested in when I was a boy were 1950's British sports cars , 1920's North American cars { what most of the car guys had when I was young, at least up here in the frozen North} early 1950's North American cars and a few years later the muscle cars. Eventually I learned about Brass era cars and became quite interested in them as well . As the years have gone by I have tended to focus more on British cars, pre war / early post war trucks and my Brass era basket case. In short the cheap end of the hobby. Home ownership, family costs and now retirement have always been a significant restriction on my hobby spending. But I am still a very devoted old car guy, just in a very penny pinching way. Along the way when I was young I qualified as a journeyman mechanic, worked in a restoration shop for a few years and was briefly a High School Shop teacher, but spent the majority of my working life as a Marine Engineer. The car hobby has been an integral part of my life for as long as I remember and in some form will probably remain so to the end. My 19 year old son is slightly interested in old cars , however for people of his generation the basic costs of life seem insurmountable let alone an expensive , space intensive hobby. Time will tell. If cost was no object I would have a L Head Mercer Raceabout and a 1971 or so Lola T212, it's just a little 2 Litre sportscar. I guess it's the Walter Mitty in me. Greg in Canada
    2 points
  30. I unloaded the car today to try to get an idea what kind of shape the engine is in. There was about 2 tablespoons of water, sludge and black oil. The engine does turn over, one waterpump was frozen but a slight tap freed it up. Tomorrow I may try to start it with fresh fluids.
    2 points
  31. Everybody would like to be able to make broad general statements about different segments of the hobby. Please try to remember that "trends" are not absolute. I was born in 1960. While I have owned a 1989 HPOF car in the past, my preferred cars are all prewar. I owned a 1954 collector car for a short while, but I have no interest in the 60's or 70's cars that I am apparently "supposed" to be most interested in. While people often identify that most young people have no interest in antique cars, they seldom seem to realize that is true of most generations. There is a small percentage of all age groups of people who are interested in antique cars. There are still "car guys" and "car gals" in the younger generation. I see them every month at our local Cars and Coffee event. The hobby, like everything else, is always changing. In spite of the setbacks in the economy in 2008 and subsequent years, the rumors of the imminent death of the hobby are quite overstated. I have been an AACA member and antique car owner since I was in my mid 30's. This hobby has always been something that is mostly affordable to the retiree crowd. It has always been less likely for a younger person to have the disposable income and storage space needed to own a collector car. While it might be a bit worse post 2008, that is not the first time in history that economic downturns have affected the hobby.
    2 points
  32. Here is an interesting close up view of the 1908 Buick Model 5 engine on the manifold side. Almost from day 1 Buick touted their automobiles as having a Valve-In-Head engine. Look closely at this engine and you will notice that the intake valves are on one side of the cylinder and that the exhaust valves are on the other side. This is what is referred to as a T-Head engine. Looking closely again, you will notice that the valves are in the block and not over the top of the cylinder bore as in an OHV (Over-Head-Valve) configuration. I find this to be extremely interesting technical information about EARLY Buick automobiles. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas
    2 points
  33. I know m-mman, (Jim). He is one of the most helpful, thorough, intelligent, accurate and selfless guys around. Obviously, he is just helping someone at an inconvenience to himself. (This is not the first time, that is just the kind of person he is). He COULD be spending his time working on his own late '20s Lincoln or Cadillac, or more modern iron, but here he is spending precious time to help two parties, one as yet unknown to him. Here's hoping you clear your space quickly , and that I visit you soon. -Cadillac Carl
    1 point
  34. I totally enjoy your enthusiasm over getting this car! That’s what it’s all about. An investment in stocks or bonds may make you more money in the long run but no one ever bothers to post pictures of them on forums or get as excited about them like this. Looking forward to your updates on the car.
    1 point
  35. Last visit Sept 2018. Might need a p.m. or quote?
    1 point
  36. AL, SORRY ABOUT THE LACK OF RESPONSE TO YOUR QUESTION. I BUILT THE FRAME. THE OUTER SUPPORT PIECES AR FROM A MODEL A FORD. THE FRAME CAME FROM SPEEDWAY MOTORS AND WAS SUPPOSED TO BE FOR A MODEL A FORD.
    1 point
  37. These are drying with no issues. One day and they’re ready to be sanded down and they get another coat. These pictures show the bottoms of both with their third coat already. Doing them in my cellar, it’s about 55-58 down there, and you’re right about the temp/ time of the year being right about 1 yr ago when I did My wheels.
    1 point
  38. I think the original poster has things backwards. If you had done that same survey with my senior class in high school (I just realized that was very close to 50 years ago), you would have gotten pretty much the same result. Of the 200 odd members of the class, exactly 3 were interested in old cars, me and the Zangari brothers. We are still friends but I can't think of anyone else we went to school with that ever owned an antique car. I get a bit tired of being told what I ought to be interested in according to my age. Born in '51, I should be interested in the 50s and the muscle cars that were popular when I was in HS. I'm not, and never have been. Truth to tell, I've no interest in much of anything after 1930 and, for the most part, prefer brass cars. There probably is a short-term interest in a particular period as the people who coveted those cars acquire disposable income but, ultimately, it fades and is replaced by another period while at the same time the best examples from all periods continue to be coveted. Car collecting is like most other things. It is heavily influenced by fad and fashion. If it suddenly became fashionable to own a Yugo, because some idiot pop music star drove one, you can bet prices would temporarily skyrocket. At the same time, there is always a bedrock of enthusiasts who are not the creatures of fashion. They are the ones that provide the floor everything else is sitting on. Realistically, old cars aren't "worth" anything. They aren't all that practical to use and they deteriorate rapidly when not maintained...unlike many antiques which, if you don't use them, don't go bad in the meantime. Their "value" is based solely on what another enthusiast will pay.
    1 point
  39. It’s a 1937 Dodge 1/2 ton from the photos provided. Series MC for the 1/2 tonners. Power Wagons came later.
    1 point
  40. Bob, Let me see if I can explain this for you. The AACA has "Nationals" in various parts of the United States each year. They are hosted by the local AACA Region(s) and are normally not held at the same place every year (see the exceptions later). At a "National" the Judged Categories of vehicles compete for the Junior or Senior award. When a vehicle is entered at a "National" for the first time it competes in the "Junior" Category. If that vehicle gets a "First Junior" Award at that event it is then eligible to compete at a future "National" (during that same year or a following year) in the "Senior" Category. If the vehicle does not get a "First Junior" award (it could get a "Second " or "Third" Junior or no award at all) then that vehicle would compete in the "Junior' category at future "National" until it gets a "First Junior" award. Once a vehicle wins a "Senior Award" (there is no 1st, 2nd or 3rd place in the Senior Category) it is then eligible to compete in a "Grand" National Meet. "Grand" National Meets are held ONCE each year alternating between the Eastern and Western USA. In 2018 The "Grand" National was held in Greensburg, PA. In 2019 it will be held in Auburn, IN and in 2020 in Allentown, PA. "Grand" National Meets are normally never held in the same place twice. Now for the "exception"..... There are a few "Nationals" that are held in the same location each year. Those are Charlotte, NC in April, Auburn, IN in May and Hershey, PA in October. I think where you got a little confused is that up until and including 2018 the Auburn, IN event was a "National". In 2019 the fine folks running the Auburn, IN event decided to host a "Grand" National Meet instead of their normal "National". (hence your confusion) To answer your original question the closest AACA "National" to Southern Wisconsin in 2019 appears to be Hershey, PA. According to the last AACA Antique Automobile Magazine (Jan/Feb 2019) the closest "National" to your location in 2020 appears to be in Auburn, IN in May of 2020. Next closest appears to be Louisville, KY in July 2020. So if you were to attend Auburn, IN in 2020 and receive a First Junior you would then be eligible to compete in the Senior category at Louisville, KY that same year. If you were unable to get a First Junior at Auburn in 2020 you could then try again for a First Junior in Louisville, KY. If you were eligible to compete and receive a Senior Award at Louisville, KY that would then make you eligible to compete at the 2020 "Grand" National in Allentown, PA. One VERY IMPORTANT thing to note is that in the past the schedule and location of a few "Nationals" have CHANGED so be advised. Historically speaking, the chance of that happening with the 2020 Auburn and Louisville "National" Meets appears very unlikely. Hopefully, I have not confused you even more with this post. If I got anything wrong I am sure other forum members will chime in to correct me. Charlie
    1 point
  41. 64 only tail panel, no lock, or cover a few pits but not bad. Good driver quality. $50 plus shipping.
    1 point
  42. I think I will do that guys. I’ve had enough time under the car for now. I need to start on another 57 that’s been patiently waiting for my undivided attention.
    1 point
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