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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/31/2018 in all areas

  1. Just joined the group. Here is my current project. 1956 Almquist Sabre. The Sabre was an early America kit car. Sold by Ed Almquist (early hot rod parts guru). There are 4 known originals I own 2 of them and 1 new body. - A new mold was pulled from my other body. David Lambert made it for his an H-Mod vintage racer project in CA Found in a field in TN. Fiberglass body on badly rusted crossly frame. Frame was also very poorly modified. I decided to scrap the frame. I had access to a Nash Metropolitan and the wheelbase was right. Found in a field in TN. Fiberglass body on badly rusted crossly frame. Frame was also very poorly modified. I decided to scrap the frame. I had access to a Nash Metropolitan and the wheelbase was right. "reinforced" Nash Frame Body on Frame for fitting. Engine - 1939 Ford v8-60 Built to about 85HP should have enough torque to light up this tiny 850lb car. Fitting engine and trans. having an old block really helps. I am using a Speedway conversion kit and a Borg Warner trans out of a Chevy S10 Ed Almquist started one of the first speed shops in America when he started taking orders via popular magazines for speed equipment in 1946. He got into the fiberglass sports car business when a friend of his, Harry Heim, approached him with the car he designed and first marketed through his company Clearfield Plastics, of Clearfield Pennsylvannia. Clearfield had started selling sports car bodies after their initial debut at a Watkins Glen show in 1955. By 1956, Heim had persuaded Almquist to take these bodies on board his company and market them nationally – which is exactly what Ed Almquist did. The short “94” wheelbase car was named the “Sabre” and the 100” wheelbase car was called the “Speedster”. Options allowed different mounting techniques for headlights, hood scoops, and even a convertible top. Later bodies were offered in the late 1950’s and early 1960’s called the Thunderbolt and “El Morrocco”. Being an East Coast company, many Almquist bodied sports cars raced throughout the northeast and midwest, and a few even made their way to the west coast as well. Just joined the group. Here is my current project. 1956 Almquist Sabre. The Sabre was an early America kit car. Sold by Ed Almquist (early hot rod parts guru)
    3 points
  2. Please take some measurements for me! That seat looks exactly like mine. I really appreciate you guys helping me out. I don't want to take a chance ripping the fabric at this point..... You guys are the best! Thanks again! Gary
    3 points
  3. And a little work on the edsel fender im still working on here and there, but started to fill up the large hole around the headlight bucket. Decided to make the raised body line in a separate piece of material to make it a bit more manageable for myself, but still need to make a wooden hammer form for it Don't mind the all over the place cleco clamps, the original metal in this area is pretty soft and I was having a time trying to find spots that they would actually hold. This new piece is further along than what I have pictures of, added a nice bead/ flange around the edge that goes to the other new piece to mimic the factory shape where the driver side grille seats up against that flange.
    3 points
  4. At least show us the car not just blurry bits and pieces and ask us to figure out what it is and if its worth the time. Only you know if something is worth your time. Looks like you're dad had one great car and a bunch of medium to low end cars that have been sitting for along time. Sell the low end cars and put your kids thru school or buy another good car with the money. Collecting junk cars that you might fix someday is just a sickness like hording anything else. Dont get sucked in or maybe you already did like you're dad and your just trying to figure out if you can make it not seem crazy. I dont know. Just please stop doing this to us tho... Hey guys should I restore this car? What do you think this stuff is worth?
    3 points
  5. I expect to drive the '37 Roadmaster Phaeton all next week - Leaving home on Saturday , driving the Buick 165 miles to Natchez, Mississippi to the AACA Sentimental Tour- Then drive the "Two-Hub" tour of Natchez and Vicksburg for the week, before driving back on the following Saturday. (And we're loaning the 1954 and 1941 Cadillac convertibles to out-of-state friends from New York and Pennsylvania to take the same drive) Hope to send some photos afterward,
    3 points
  6. I would certainly love it (as I know others would too) if your posts were less mysterious and more to the point. The game playing gets old... My apologies ahead of time if this is viewed as being rude - this is not normal operating procedure for me.
    3 points
  7. Recently moved with the family to a subdivision near our prior place. This location had several conveniences that made it a bit more attractive for us. It also had a 3 car attached garage and I only had a two car detached at the old house. Of course, these homes only have a 20ft deep (barely) garage. That doesn’t leave much room to work on my 60 LeSabre or 72 Electra! So, the plan was to build a detached garage at the top of the driveway (my clubhouse). Work started in earnest today, digging the footers. Little issue with some unmarked cable and phone lines, but they worked around them. Plan is 24x25, which is the largest the Town will allow.
    2 points
  8. Hello and a huge thank you to those that have helped me thus far on the Buick/Prewar/Classic Cars Facebook pages!! It comes as a suggestion for me to join this group of Buick lovers and I am Beyond excited to drive my car for the first time! i purchased this ‘27 Standard about 3 months ago, already took my first trip to enjoy the vendors and show at Hershey (I’m only about 2 hrs away at times), and am looking forward to the thrill of owning a classic car and frankly getting to know you fine folks! Ok onto my questions, I’ll keep it to just one for my first post! my car has been sitting since Dec 2004 with gas in the tank, carb, SW Vacuum Fuel Pump, and lines (yummy!!). We quickly determined we had a rotten top section of the fuel tank, so we built a brand new tank, baffles, and recessed end caps and all! This coming week we will weld in the necks from the old tank and then line the tank! So, onto another matter, the rear glass molding is kinda cracked up, would love to replace the molding...... Bob’s the best place for it? Car looks too good for cracked up rubbers! excuse the dust, I still have had no time to even wash her!! more questions ahead but just an intro and one for now! thanks again for the welcome and I hope to someday give more than I take from the group! William
    2 points
  9. Back in the early and mid 60's, when it was (almost) every kid's dream to own a 1957 Chevy BelAire two door hardtop, one of the favorite customizing tricks was to install a 1957 Buick gill in it. It was popular enough that the 57 grill was incuded in the 57 Chevy AMT model kit.
    2 points
  10. I've been spending time for 3 months preparing this engine (240CI from CD8 Sedan) for a trial start and run before removing entire drivetrain from the barnfind chassis. As far as I have been able to learn, engine was last run in the 60's when the car was brought to Virginia from NY. Plan is to use it in my Roadster project. I've completed most everything except for any rebuilding of major internals, i.e. crank/cam/pistons/rings/cylinder walls, all of which seemed fine. A compression test once running will tell the story on those items, fingers crossed. Have rebuilt or refurbished Head, full Valve Train, Starter, Generator, Oil Pump, Fuel Pump, Water Pump and fan belt, Radiator (and added temporary red hoses), Crankcase vent, Wiring Loom, Oil Pan and Filter, and accelerator/throttle linkage (mounting bracket was broken in 2 pieces as is normal for these). All new gaskets, wires, plugs, cap, points and condenser and refurbished distributor and set timing. After freeing up manifold butterfly, installed modern Carburetor recommended by CarbKing, it being a NOS Carter FY for a 1969 Ford inline 6 300CI engine. Fitted it to manifold riser and throttle lever is in perfect alignment with original throttle linkage rod. I had to make a corresponding lever to clamp to rod as shown, using a throttle lever from an older spare CLUM switch assembly. Have not decided on "choke solution" yet, may leave as is or remove modern choke and make a manual cable driven one. Made 1" special riser for fitting on top of carb to take clamp-on original air cleaner. Have a temp gas can set up and am installing temp dash today to receive OIL/AMP/TEMP gauges and ignition switch/coil (had to have pair of keys made for switch). Final steps will be to install miscellaneous wiring (amp/ign/coil/dist etc), and a temp exhaust, muffler, and battery. Also still have to replace frost plugs and add fluids. Looking forward to a smooth start!
    2 points
  11. No idea.. I've looked and looked but no luck... sorry I'm stumped. At least consider this a free nudge to the top for viewing... It beats getting buried by Nicks numerous ridiculous KMART type of threads... I would be shocked if he studied anything for himself.
    2 points
  12. Some progress being made in an effort to start body working and high fill primer by the end of the year. Rolled the Century out of the shop to move a few cars around and also to spin the Buick around so I could more conveniently work on the passenger side. There's still some paint hiding around in some crevices around the front fenders, and I didn't touch the hood or trunk, but I did a solid first pass with some fairly coarse sanding discs to knock down the old paint and crusty surface rust, and started clearing a few dents that I've found. not many surprises around the body with the paint off, no surprise filler anywhere, a few spots of brazing on the rear passenger fender flange, and some more brazing around the tail pan but that will just be cleaned up as it was done well enough. a few small areas that will get cut out and replaced with new metal, but for the most part, some areas will be treated with a rust neutralizer after a few more sanding passes on the bare body. And started cutting out the passenger side door sill/ rocker areas. Had to make a handful of pieces, including the inner body structure, the inner rocker rail, a new outer rocker skin, and a new outer door sill piece, and have been busy getting those in and looking right, still have some massaging to do with the sill, and I ended up pie cutting most of the length of it to make for a better fit, so it looks a little askew but will look right when done, as the sill corner isn't welded in yet, and the bottom of the sill hasn't been welded to the inner rocker so its just sort of hanging there. Not the prettiest of welds, just slowly tacked into place, but was cleaned up later Start of making the new door sill Added the weather stripping channel to the top, not a million miles off, just the front facing edge came out a little bigger than anticipated which later required some cutting and refitting, but not bad for the side of a table and some stuff I've collected over the years to hammer metal over First pass cleaning up the joining edges of the new and old outer rocker, still a few more passes to clean it up, but that's about where I am with it,
    2 points
  13. uhhh Steve....keeping "a breast" is not the same as "keeping abreast". Apparently Freud is still slipping.
    2 points
  14. I know you guys would not be posting if you did not care. I applaud you for your ideas even if some do not understand all the issues involved with putting on this event. However, while it may be cathartic to post here, it does not have the impact that a letter to the Hershey Region would have. Address your concerns to the 2019 Fall Meet Chairman. I am not aware that the region has many folks on this forum. I try my best to keep abreast of your concerns, those of the national club and my personal concerns to later discuss with the region but your letters would be more impactful. I only ask you to be respectful in your comments to these people who work their butts off on our behalf.
    2 points
  15. Here is yet another example of why it is not a good idea to provide technical information when one does not fully understand the particular car being asked about (and I put myself in that group, by the way). A little research shows that the 1977 Seville has TWO electric fuel pumps, a low pressure boost pump in the tank and a high pressure pump on the frame rail. The line that the OP has replaced is a LOW PRESSURE line - about 15 PSI - from the boost pump to the high pressure pump. The fuel line and clamps he has used will be more than adequate for that application. This, by the way, is why the OP correctly pointed out that the old hoses were comparable to the new low pressure hose. Problem solved.
    2 points
  16. MIke, At first I was really pissed at your comment as I was last year but then I realized you do not understand the uncommon spots we have. The four spots in the Red field our group of three vendors have are bumper to bumper not side by side like we had on the old Green Field. We use one spot solely for vending and sitting for us and friends and/or sometimes even spectators that need a place under an "easy up" to sit and rest or get out of the sun or rain. The other two have tables or parts on the ground along Two of the RV's. The other spot has a RV that is too far down the way for us to watch our stuff. We set up four long 3x8 tables, and two or three shorter tables. We also have lots of items on the pavement along the RV's In total, we probably have a row of parts along 60-70 foot of our 120 foot of space on the road. If we were parked next to each other like most of the Hershey spaces, we would have only 40 foot of vending space in front of the RV's as each space is 10x30. Our tables and space on the pavement has a lot of pre war and brass era parts like lamps along with post war car items, toy cars, book and misc. We also bring items from other club members to sell and also allow friends and sometimes passers by to store purchased parts at our spot along with providing a place for friends to get out of the weather in the RV's. It takes about two hours for the three of us to set up on Tuesday and two hours on Friday to pack up. Also about the same time to load and unload the parts and tables from the RV's at home. We vendors also have to deal with PA sales tax forms twice a year even though we vend only once. IF we had to park our RV's across the Street and walk to the space daily moving very valuable parts each time , none of us would come to Hershey as would the majority of RV/vendors. The RV's in the flea market make the event more comfortable given the changing weather conditions and a place for many that have pets to be close. While my RV is just less than the 30 foot space it occupies, most at Hershey are over 30 thus the need for two like the ones in the picture above. While three of the pictures above appear to have no parts for sale next to their RV's, one is marginal, the last one has two RVs with two large tables of parts. I have no problem with the last picture. I also have friend who has a space with a car and just a table with information about his popular speedo repair business which he mans part of the week. I agree vendors should not use all of their spaces for solely for parking or camping. However, if large RV's are kicked out since they can not fit on a 10x30 space, Hershey will change dramatically and not for the better as many of those vendors bring lot of cool stuff and sometimes just display like the Stanley Steamer near us that Jay Leno was riding in. There was also a Duesenburg near us in Trailer behind an RV that was out for display in flea market before the Saturday show. Tom Muth
    2 points
  17. The Riviera W15 interior option cost $2,900 in 1985. This is equivalent to over $6,800 in 2018 dollars. The W15 package was installed in 647 of the 65,305 Rivieras produced in 1985, less than 1% of the production. Please note that the largest production number for any model year Riviera was 1985. Even higher cost was the 1982-1985 convertible which added about $10,000 to the sticker price. This is equivalent to over $23,000 in 2018 dollars. Jim Vesely ROA # 7437 BCA # 39477
    2 points
  18. Mike, Quit your bitchin', enjoy Hershey for what it is. It's a swap meet, car show, car coral, gathering of friends. If you don't like what is happening stay home, things have changed in this hobby and you have to change with the times, you're not that old if you were 18 in 1976. I've been vending for years and yes, it is not the same. I continue to go and will continue to go. Life is too short, look for the positives and stop being so negative, enjoy Hershey and forget all the other BS. Pat
    2 points
  19. I used the metal hook for a few minutes, so I could test drive it and take a picture of it. I found an old belt from the kid's closet, cut it to length and this is how it looks now. At some point I will get a longer leather strap like the one it came with and replace the belt, but this is how it looks as of right now. It just rocks now... doesn't roll...
    2 points
  20. How about $38,600 fully loaded in '99 … The Silver Arrow almost made it. With every available option, and the SA Package ... Probably the highest the Riviera ever got to, but I can't say for sure?
    2 points
  21. With the pump body almost done, I started on the rotor. I'm making this out of a free-machining steel and didn't have a piece the right size so I used this... it's too big but I didn't have the patience to wait a week for another piece. The hole in the center was drilled out and reamed to 1" (the diameter of the camshaft). Then I turned the OD and the length to about .025 larger than the estimated finished size. I can't really finish this until I am able to assemble the pump and get some final measurements. I'm waiting on a piece needed to finish the ends of the pump so I interrupted the job to make 3 brass hex nuts. These will be part of the oiling system - another of my 3 AM ideas. It is coming together quite well but, like all my projects, I find myself making changes while I'm making them. This is 1-1/2" brass hex stock. After going something like 5 years without any need for a 3-jaw chuck, I realized I needed one for this job and used the chuck I'd prepared for the dividing head. The pieces were cut in the hacksaw, then drilled and bored so I can tap them 1"-20 - a tap I have because I bought it to make the rotary turning fixture. The holes have to be bored because there is no standard size drill for this thread. With one face clean, I tapped them. Then mounted them on a fixture I also made for the rotary turning tool. Needless to say, the job went faster because I'd already made the fixtures I needed. The last step was putting a chamfer on the edges. The result was pretty good. These are going to retain two large Banjo fitting which I also have to make and it is critical that the faces be flat and parallel. I managed to find a reasonably inexpensive lapping plate so when it arrives I'll lap the faces.
    2 points
  22. I didn’t drive an old Buick this weekend, but headed down to the Twin Cities for a Gopher State Chapter dinner for those who have actively participated. I did spend some time wandering around a pole barn with mostly old Buicks in it. It was good to breathe that air and spend some time with Buick friends again.
    2 points
  23. Plywood welding rods of various types....
    2 points
  24. With all but a couple small patches of floor coating left to do, I’ve started a few other projects needed to help “move into” the shop. On the list is an old four post lift, to be first cleaned up and painted. Then, a blower for the paint booth to be affixed to a concrete pad just outside the building. Next, a 400 lb steel table for my welding station will need to look respectable - although I don’t know why.
    2 points
  25. What a great event in Lakeland Florida. Thank you Olds club of Florida!
    1 point
  26. Hood Hinge Bracket When I first got my car the only thing holding the rear hood hinge was a piece of sheet metal with 2 holes. I made a better piece out of aluminum. I had no idea at the time what it was to look like. Then I got my repro parts book from "BOB's" and saw what part # 41095 Hood Hinge Bracket was to look like. Since I had to spend such an inordinate amount of time searching for the Radiator Brace Rod I misplaced (thanks to Hugh who found it) and these other parts on the cowl end. I thought I would try to make something closer to the original. Luckily I have the same part on my Master to copy. I laid out a piece of 5/8" thick steel from measurements on the Master part. Hack sawed out the rough tapered sides. Drilled (2) 5/16" holes adjacent to each other for the slot to be filed out later. Drilled the 17/64" hinge rod hole as a centering arbor then using that drill in a drill chuck in the tailstock of my lathe. Then, carefully chucking it in a 4 jaw chuck, reversing one jaw and using a piece brass filler for one end to be able to center it. I had to take 1/16" deep cuts and a light feed to avoid kicking out the large end. Once the stepped end was to size with a .460 diameter concentric to the 17/64" hole I removed the piece. I installed my 3 jaw chuck to center to the .460 diameter and faced off the rear surface to size. Final operation using a bench grinder, Dremel disk sander and files to finish to my layout marks. At the left is the temporary aluminum one I made in 2011. On the right the one that looks like part #40195. NOTE* Part book calls out “specify color”. So this will be painted.Brewster Green!
    1 point
  27. Here are the driver side measurements, i tried to include some reference point on whatever ruler i was usin, but let me know if you need anything else
    1 point
  28. The yellow (Sequoia Cream) 1939 Buick 41-C convertible sedan in the second picture belongs to me. It has a new top and is a 1982 AACA 1st Junior car, which I detailed again and it got the Senior in 2004. Ha, I sold it in 1985 and repurchased it from the museum in 2000. I've owned it 33 of the last 48 years (bought/sold/repurchased). Now I am 80 and I've decided to sell it for the second and last time. It will advertised in the December BCA Buick Bugle and the Nov-Dec AACA Antique Automobile magazine. I'm also thinking of just consigning it once my 1964 Buick Wildcat is sold. It was also at this show. This '39 Buick was sold new in Washington, DC. You can chat with me on 804-366-4870 if you wish.
    1 point
  29. Jeff, sounds like you're having a fun time. Aren't old cars fun? When I fired up my engine on the stand for the first time I had a freeze plug leaking. After it warmed up it stopped. Once you get it to where you can run it longer they may stop leaking. My third member has a drip now that just started along with the rear main seal starting to drip after running the car. Stay positive, you will get it all fixed up. Maybe one of those fancy beers will help.
    1 point
  30. Pete, The easiest way to check the ratio, considering the torquetube drive, is to pull the sparkplugs, raise one rear wheel, shift the transmission into 3rd gear, mark the lower front pulley or the flywheel, have someone rotate the rear wheel until it makes a complete rotation - (or two rotations - since the other wheel is on the ground, or rotate both rear wheels at the same time only one rotation) Count the number of rotations of the pulley/flywheel That should give you the differential ratio
    1 point
  31. Everything looks great Joel! AND, those floors look FANTASTIC!
    1 point
  32. Packard number is body type 992, body number 12599 of that type. http://www.packardinfo.com/xoops/html/downloads/PackardIDNumbers.pdf 992 was a 1936 120 Touring Sedan. http://www.packardinfo.com/xoops/html/modules/modelinfo/viewmodel.php?modelnum=992&ButtonLookup=Go
    1 point
  33. These cars were built during prohibition... Could be an owner-mod secret access panel for hiding hooch.
    1 point
  34. Not a Buick truck. Just a service truck for a Buick dealer. I think a GMC truck.
    1 point
  35. Variation on WQ59B's mod. Was going to show as b/w "Factory Photo" but red color of donor Premiere was so beautiful had to show in living color. All thanks to whoever now owns the Premiere. Moved the forward edge of C-pillar far forward to eliminate need for rear vent windows, solving what was the car's biggest design headache: how to get the rear windows to roll down. Vent windows would have needed to open automatically before side glass moved back and down. That problem now solved, a very sporty profile results. The downside is poor rear ingress/egress. But I like it! Not sure about the Conti hump for this car but certainly the rear trim applique could have changed from horizontal bars to something more intricate, pattern copied in taller front grill. Perhaps a pillared sedan could have also been offered to increase market coverage, with rear vent windows and Premiere coupe's backlight working from same roof stamping as 4 door hardtop.
    1 point
  36. I have a 48 new yorker too ,had it for 12 years ,you have made a wonderful job!
    1 point
  37. And that folks, is what's meant by crumple zones!
    1 point
  38. A little bit of automotive art to the walls. Will not be adding any shelves on the walls. Two garage cabinets along the side walls and the green caninets will be painted white later.
    1 point
  39. Dav, is there a Maybach club? What was prewar production and how many cars have survived? I have never driven a Maybach, but got to sit in a SW38 once and make engine noises.
    1 point
  40. Randy, I’ve been grateful for the times when I was able to get a crew of people to help with the larger tasks. Each time I tried to “economize” the project by making sure I was as prepared as possible by having supplies ready and knowing what I wanted. It was always uplifting to see so much progress in a short time. I’m now working on my bathroom vanity. There’s nothing standard about what I need, so I’m building it from scratch - and scraps. The ‘74 is feeling at home around the shop. It’s a smooth ride.
    1 point
  41. In retirement, cash flow is no problem, it’s the direction. I watch for bargains and do most of the work myself. I’m more concerned about my physical ability to do a good day’s work and then do it all over again the next day. Then, there’s the mental part where you put things here and there and immediately forget where you laid it. Or, you go to Lowe’s and get about half of what you needed. It’s seems to me that progress is at a snail’s pace. Check out this pic, it’s a caulked saw line in my concrete. It took several days to clean out and caulk these cracks. I had just over 600 feet to do! It should have been done just after they were sawn but at that time, it seemed I had more important things to do.
    1 point
  42. The best day of laying tile is always the last day. I’ve been working on my shower and bathroom floor. It’s all done and grouted and now I need to build a vanity. I don’t do these things very quickly. The bending, crouching, and hands and knees really takes a toll on me. Just glad it’s done.
    1 point
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