Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/20/2018 in all areas

  1. Got my 72 up on my lift to dust off the underside after our trip to the ROA a few weeks ago and thought I would share a few pics for anyone who might be interested . 2 1/2 inch stainless - easy to clean with scotch-brite. KReed ROA 14549
    7 points
  2. Pretty close to being finished. I needed to plate a couple of linkage pieces so I'll add those tomorrow. I have no idea if I did it right or if they will work, but I was able to follow all the steps (sucarbs.co.uk is a great source along with Joe's site) and was fairly confident that I was doing what the directions said to do. I'm cautiously optimistic that'll they'll work with a little tuning.
    6 points
  3. @cjp69 That is one sweet Riviera! Love the blackwall tires! just screams performance! Meanwhile, drove the GS approximately 140 miles yesterday. Just local touring after a late breakfast run. This car is my favorite! The picture below is one of the dirt roads in that area. It may look like the driveway to this farm home, but it's on the maps and just passed by the property.
    5 points
  4. I think this is a late teens Franklin from the looks of the front of the car. Spotted by my son in the Burlingame CA area a few days ago.
    4 points
  5. I completed one throttle washer today. I sure do appreciate all of the help with dimensions and advice. I bought a small piece of stainless and used a couple of bimetal hole saws and a grinder. It's all polished up and ready to go. Too bad that this is a 1925 Buick Standard 1 year only part. Hugh
    4 points
  6. Finally got to drive my 71 GS for the first time this weekend, went to a show on Sunday.
    4 points
  7. It has been a very long time since I posted any progress on my project. Its now running and sort of driving. That was a big hurdle to get done. Those first few trials very stressful wondering if I forgot something and the engine will blow up and it was all for nothing. Luckily it runs and sounds great. With two kids and a busy job I havnt had much time to spend on it in the last few months. Like all projects I have found it to be far more work than I expected, but thats the whole reason of doing it! The wood is slowly coming along, but also far more detailed work than I could have ever imagined!!! I like to keep a oil stain on the floor under it to keep the dust down?
    4 points
  8. And guess what showed up at Back to the Bricks in Flint over the last weekend, courtesy of NATMUS, thanks to Sid and Belva:
    3 points
  9. Just got back from a car show supporting Veterans at the American Legion in Laurel Maryland. Fantastic time for a worthy cause. I am definitely going to starting to look into getting a 1 1/8 inch Performance Front Sway Bar for the Buick, she felt like she was swimming going around some corners today
    3 points
  10. Hi all At last - after 10 years in storage (in the US) and then best part of a year with me in the UK 'tinkering' - my special order paint '65 has come back to life...here's a link to a short youtube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j2MZNAsxuK4 Couldn't have done it without help from this forum so many thanks to all - very glad to return a 65 to the road where it belongs..... All the best Kev
    2 points
  11. The banjo wheels were also available in Mahogany in addition to Ivory. There is a bit of debate about the correct color of the Ivory wheels. One school of thought is that they were almost white and have yellowed over the years. Another school of thought is that they were a darker Ivory when new. I am much too young to know for sure. For years, I thought they were all Ivory, but have recently seen more Mahogany ones, although I think most people expect to see the more common Ivory color steering wheels. If I had a standard wheel in good condition, along with the original factory documentation, I would be tempted to use it. It would be a bit of a conversation starter since lots of people would try to tell you that it was incorrect.
    2 points
  12. Morgan, I have been following your posts for the past few days and I feel your pain. I was able to remove only 8 of the 12 valve cages and I too broke my Buffum tool trying to remove one of the stuck cages. The tip on the small hook broke off and I had to get it welded. Currently, the remaining 4 cages are soaking in the 50/50 acetone/brake fluid mix you suggested and I have pressure on one of the springs with the Buffum tool. It's been soaking for just over 24 hours, but no success as of last night. I also have a significant amount of carbon build up on the pistons and valves. In fact, my engine, 1922 45 straight six, is ceased and I am in the process of removing the connector caps in order to remove the head.
    2 points
  13. The food prices seem absurd but then it's a short term thing and if I were coming to this event I wouldn't grumble too much.I went to Hershey in the Fall of 1989 and it was a captive market as far as food vendors were concerned. I think they were all one outfit scattered over the ground and identical prices says I'm right. Here in Huntington WV we have a family owned eatery close by and they have what many think are expensive sandwiches but the quality is always there and these prices keep it from becoming a "hangout" for low life types that are plaguing parking lots now.We were once threatened by two of these punks and I asked them if they had a pre-need burial plan and I told them I was armed.I always am with either a 45 Colt or a 38 Super and have no patience with those who won't learn to work or are on drugs.
    2 points
  14. Cummins Diesel engines built in '98-'99 with a large 53 cast into the sides of the block had a bad habit of the water jackets cracking just above the pan. Mine developed a 10" crack just after it went out of warranty. Out of desperation I "stitched" it using 3/8" bolts sealed with Loctite. Worked well and lasted about 6 months until I could afford a new engine. There is nothing mystical about the stitching process. We have it done by our local NAPA machine shop and have never had a failure.
    2 points
  15. Hannibal crossing the Tug Hill Plateau coming into Rome, New York.
    2 points
  16. Seems we have read about a dead or weak battery before? And people say I am frugal.
    2 points
  17. Ride in the early morning mist. Tom Kunek Victoria, Australia ROA#3845 BCA#47703
    2 points
  18. I used to be a sheet metal worker in local #24 out of Dayton, Ohio. When the tank on my 1923 Hupmobile starting filling my fuel system with rust flakes AGAIN last year (after several professional attempts to fix it), I was griping to a friend that I could have made that tank out of stainless steel myself, back when I was bending tin for a living. He reminded me of a mutual friend on our pool team who still was a sheet metal worker. The guy (Steve) agreed to build me a new tank, using stainless steel. Another friend assured me it could be painted, using special materials (my tank is exposed to plain view). I gave Steve my old tank, and he went to work fabricating and welding up the new tank body for me. Then, an old drag racer-pal of mine used his machining skills to make a perfect replica filler neck, fuel line fitting-boss, and gas gauge neck. Paul Frost also cut apart my old, broken diecast metal gas gauge assembly, and machined new parts out of brass to make it work. (That's Paul, in the photo below). Then it was painted, and it looks beautiful today. I can FINALLY say that I really am done with rust particles in the fuel bowl of my Hupmobile carburetor.
    2 points
  19. Well, I wanted to post a couple of pictures of my new purchase of this 1921 Buick. It's been inside a trailer for many years and I couldn't get many good pictures since I have not moved it out yet. Don't know if it even rolls. I pushed and pulled on the doors and the cowling and everything felt solid, so I hope the body wood is good. The floorboards seemed solid also and the upholstery seems untorn from what I could see. The windshield looked great with no cracks. The only real "body rot" I saw was on the lower right hood. Don't know much else about the car. The serial number from the rear frame is 772608. I did not get any engine numbers. I will plan to go get the car in the next few months since I live in MD and the car is in Fl and I am still working full time. The car is said to have been vandalized in a Barn in NC about 20 years ago so the door handles, headlamps and radiator cap are missing. Front fenders were solid and laying on top of the car hood. I am excited to get it home to start tinkering with it. Can anyone tell me when this was built by the serial number?
    1 point
  20. Bernie, It was YOUR $6 so whose business is it and I am sure your family was glad to get the call.. I find a lot of people entertaining by their worrying over a small amount of money. I will never hold onto something that I can never keep or worry about what I can never have. I have a number of interests including pre WW2 cars, seaplanes of all kinds, BIG steam locomotives, Fine single shot rifles both muzzle loading and breech loading. I have a small machine shop and do small jobs when I want to and am making up an English style Flintlock rifle now to use in competition.Proves I am 1/2 a bubble from level but that's just me and I enjoy my world.
    1 point
  21. For what it's worth, the thermostat housing = head outlet neck would probably have been on the engine when it was painted, so would have been engine colour? Is there a little hole in the thermostat to let air and a tiny bit of water through? Mine had an air lock under the thermostat until I drilled a little hole in it; the thermostat didn't get warm enough to open.
    1 point
  22. Sorry missed that one . Kings32
    1 point
  23. Unless you are a stickler for originality you will likely be happier with a 230 or 250 engine. They are alike and interchangeable. In fact almost impossible to tell apart. If you want to go big the 292 truck six will fit, although it it 1" taller.
    1 point
  24. I talked to Jeff of CARS in 2014 at the ROA meet in Colorado Springs about the tan trunk mats. He said at that time they had a problem with production and had no plans to try to produce more. He mentioned the blems to me at that time. I did order one of the blems the next year. The problem with them was a chalky look on a portion of the surface. I was able to bring it back to a presentable condition using various products such as vinyl protectant, car wax, etc. I am satisfied with the result and it was cheap. It is not perfect. In fact, the result gave it the look of a slightly used original rather than a squeaky, clean repro. I do have to be somewhat careful as it seems to scuff easily. I keep a blanket over it and got a cheap tan trunk mat on e-bay that was able to be cut to fit the whole trunk area over the blanket.This set up allows me to protect the trunk mat and also keeps my trunk liner clean and stain free. Ken, this was the same trunk mat that was in my car at the BCA Heartland Regional. A blem might be worth a try. Bill
    1 point
  25. This one's better than core. But I'll just keep it. Ebay listing is deleted. At $50 after fees it's not worth it.
    1 point
  26. Heres my jack set up, about 30lbs of confidence
    1 point
  27. Google translator from Turkish to English: Peri-Han. We have our beautiful star plate number 38639 burgundy and cream(y) Buick with Super Dynaflow car. But I don't have access to the Turkish alphabet. You'll notice some of the lower case "i's" are dotted, some are not. Could make a difference.
    1 point
  28. Pressing the passenger side now, squirting water ? now and then for a week period. the headliner windlace rail (painted in orange) already installed.
    1 point
  29. Dear 48NWYKR, When I read your first post in this thread I thought you were crazy, but now after reading some of the later posts, I know you will make it! A word of caution though, nowadays, Mexico is considered a dangerous place to drive. I have a friend that went to Guatemala last year to visit family, and they all had bodyguards with them.
    1 point
  30. 1934 Cadillac La Salle Boat Tail Speedster project The 1934 Cadillac La Salle was the poster car of the Art Deco height of automobile styling revolution. It introduced sleek grills, clamshell guards, Bi Plane bumpers and long “speed in motion” styling. The long port holed bonnet hid a large 240ci straight 8 motor that, whist copied from the Oldsmobile raw casting, was total engineered by Cadillac. In their stock state, the 1934 La Salle was capable of over 100mph and was chosen as the pace car at the 1934 Indianapolis 500. Created by legendary GM Stylist Harley Earl, the ’34 La Salle was one of his all-time master pieces. It appears that the older I get the older the cars get and this La Salle project has been on the back burner for too long while I've worked on other earlier Cadillac & veteran's and now should go to another owner with renewed vigour. Whilst GM never produced a factory Boattail a few were produced by independent coach builders, this car is styled on those creations. This right hand drive model is one of the few export models produced for the Australian market. The frame is sandblasted and painted in GM Black, the front end is assembled, wheels painted (deep maroon) with correct new Firestone 650 x 16” White Wall tyres. Lots of the custom boattail wood work is completed with single “dicky seat”. The block & crank have been stripped & blasted & coated to protect it ready for re-build. The very hard to find Bi Plane bumpers are present and in good condition, including the bumper with the rear step plates for the dicky seat passengers. Front & rear guards are sandblasted and primed as is the bonnet & cowl all are rust free. As well as quite a few NOS parts, there are plenty of spares including a sedan and a very rare set of 6 wheel equipped guards (Harley Earl pleaded with GM not to permit the use of 6 wheel equipment as he fell it ruined the lines of the styling, however customers demanded them!). Also included is the rare and unique to 1934 luggage rack to mount around the Bi Plane bumper & a period correct heater. Complete with extensive literature, this stunning project awaits completion. More details & photos upon request. Car located in Mudgee Au. $US25,500 delivered to Long Beach Ca.
    1 point
  31. Here is an UNMODIFIED 1955 Chevrolet Nomad.
    1 point
  32. Drove my “new to me “ 90 red convertible in the Woodward Dream Cruise. Didn’t see any other Reattas. Couldn’t believe how many people wanted to know more about the car, had some people run into the traffic to see what it was. Great showing it off!
    1 point
  33. What good does matching numbers mean, when the car has been drastically modified in construction?
    1 point
  34. Good idea. Makes it easy for the victims lawyer to find you after the accident and for the insurance company to know where to send the letter advising of the pending fraud investigation..................Bob
    1 point
  35. Friday was the local Cruise-In down on the waterfront and after getting my fuel supply in place, fired her up and went for a ride around the block. That felt good! Once back in the driveway checked under the hood and all looked well so washed off the bit of dust from the new house construction next door that always seems to get under a cover. Weather forecast was "iffy" but left the top down and headed to the parking lot to meet up with the usual gang who were texting to see if we were coming and advised they had saved a spot. Busy with good conversation and such when I look up and see a familiar face. It was Gary and his wife which they drove their 1939 Buick to be here. Introduced each other and chatted for a bit looking at my car and then looked at the western skyline... decided to put up the top (as did my friends) and walked over to his Buick to see it before the rain started. I knew this car some 20 or so years ago and it looks very good today. Then the light rain started... Decided to walk back to my car and Gary said they were going into the Casino and get supper. Suggested they head on in before it really rained and as they were out of sight, it rained cats and dogs! Now, this is a car show and one expects to be out and walking around seeing cars but here my wife and I were, sitting in the car with steamy windows (and not for the good reason- LOL) so when the rain eased off a bit, talked to the group who thought about going into the Casino for supper too. Most of us were soaked through and once someone said if we went in there with the air conditioning this wet that some one was going to get ill. With a calculated guess that the evening was shot due to weather, decided to drop off the cars, get changed and meet for a warm dry dinner. It wasn't unanimous so half stayed to brave it out. Our restaurant choice was a bit of a drive and it really rained on the way there but stopped before dinner was over. Sadly we might have made a hasty decision as I saw posting of the Crusie around Town about 5:30 and things had dried up! Still felt good to get behind the wheel of the Special though, even with my temporary fuel supply!
    1 point
  36. No governor from the factory; that was likely added when the engine was converted to use as a stationary engine. The exhaust manifold is, as I alluded, a biggie: Cracked manifolds are common. reproduction manifolds are >$2,000. I think it would be worth your while to pull the spark plugs and add about 3 or 4 ounces of a 50/50 mix of acetone and ATF (or Marvel Mystery Oil available at Walmart & O'Reillys) to each cylinder, then put the plugs back in finger-tight. Let sit for a week before trying to rotate the crankshaft. If it will budge at all when you go to sell it, it will be worth more than a stuck engine. Valves may well be stuck in the guides, prohibiting rotation, but don't worry about those for now. Lump, Seagrave bought Pierce-Arrow 8 and 12 cylinder engines in the 1930s, machined but parts-matched-yet-disassembled. They bought the tooling for these engines when Pierce was liquidated in 1938. Seagrave modified the engines to use dual ignition (2 plugs per cylinder) and other mods. Seagrave used the 8-cyl thru WW2, and the V-12 through the late 1960s, albeit in modified form. I have a 1941 Seagrave 8-cyl as a backup engine. I won't use the dual ignition head, but almost all other components interchange, and it came with TWO of the Delco 662-J distributors used on 1933-36 Pierce 8s. Seagrave 12 engines moved the distributor drive to the front of the engine (2 12-cyl distributors) and thus had different camshafts and timing covers than Pierce 12s, as well as dual ignition heads.
    1 point
  37. Forum Members, BCA Members, AACA Members, and who ever else cares to listen, The back and forth played out on the forum HAS to stop. Regardless of which side you are on it is NOT in the best interests of the BCA to continue the bickering in public. What is in the best interest of the BCA is to email one, several or all of the BCA Board of Directors of your choosing and tell them your opinions and desires and then let them do the job they were elected to do. We need to be working together for the betterment of the club not dividing ourselves apart. Please, enough is enough lets move on to having fun with our Buicks. Respectfully, BCA PAST PRESIDENT Brian DePouli
    1 point
  38. While it is not the weekend, we had our local AACA Chapter's Annual Ice Cream Social this evening at a member's house. In addition to my 1937 Century we had a 1935 Buick and a 1923 Buick among the antique cars driven to the event.
    1 point
  39. 57 wagon 98 percent done!! one year start to finish, will be taken to car show this weekend to get feed back
    1 point
  40. A friend captured a better photo of the instrument panel of my 1959 Electra.
    1 point
  41. Sunday, August 12 at the Land of Lakes GTO club Musclecar Classic. One photo is with my wife, youngest son and mom, 93 years young. Mark
    1 point
  42. Good day to celebrate today When something is broken since 1984 and it it works again, it is a good day in my book to to celebrate. I am lIt and this this is for you Niki...
    1 point
  43. Mark, I use this master parts book a lot. It will help with finding the year range of parts that are available. Hugh
    1 point
  44. The C-platform was new for 1940 and featured a wider body with no running boards. That platform was used for the Buick Super and Roadmaster for 1940 and 41, the Cadillac Series 62, and the large series Oldsmobile. Since my car was missing so many parts and required so much sheet metal reconstruction I was in search of similar cars to use as a model. The first car was a 1940, 50 series car that was part of a barn find for Mr. Earl (aka Lamar Johnson). He was made aware of this collection by a member of the BCA Dixie Chapter. It had been in storage for a reported 20-25 years when the owners father had passed. The cars were a part of his collection. This car was partially restored years ago and was mostly complete. The engine was stuck and has since been freed. The missing parts are evident in this photo and is everything related to the drivers door window assembly. The next big boost that I got was an invitation to Terry Boyce's beautiful 1940 76C. The history of ownership of this car strongly suggests that it belonged to Harley Earl when new. I photographed every conceivable angle of Terry's car and created a photo log of each section of the car for future reference. Some aspect's of Terry's car were unique to the Boss' special order capability such as the dual carb engine, foot operated parking brake and pneumatic shift assist. My wife and I spent a lovely weekend in Detroit with Terry and his wife. That meeting, that weekend, and all that help are the real reason for involvement in the vintage car hobby!
    1 point
  45. Here you go! Still taking them.
    1 point
  46. Found a chassis in Michigan, correct engine, still no wiring and no interior. The 76C had a 1941 engine. The engine in this chassis was advertised for sale and when I queried the seller about the engine serial number, I learned that this engine was correct for about the time period the 76C was manufacturered. The car was a four door Roadmaster, abandoned in a barn that had fallen in on itself. The contractor hired to push the old barn into the nearby ravine and build new discovered this and two other cars. He wanted to keep the body to make a rat rod. He happily had me carry the whole chassis away. I got lots of valuable parts such as the optional 3.6:1 rear end, shift linkage, extra shocks to rebuild, brake drums, transmission and a model of where brake lines, the gas line and such were positioned. None of that was present on the 76C. I had the engine completely machined, replacing all moving parts and had one cylinder resleeved. The head is rebuilt with new valves and planed slightly to match the block. Engine complete except for accessories.
    1 point
  47. Nick, A word of caution regarding a stuck engine. On my E 45, the water pump was rusted solid, preventing the engine from turning over. I would recommend you verify , or remove the water pump shaft, before you try and force the engine to move. If it is the pump that is locked up, you could end up damaging the timing gear forcing the engine to move. Glenn Manes Wheatridge CO USA
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...