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Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/07/2018 in all areas

  1. Finally jumped back in the BS&S and knocked out this wall today. Half the day was spent massaging the bottom truss cord into a strait line then built the wall in two sections, stood them up and nailed the top plate to the truss and glued and Hilti nailed the bottom plate to the floor. Was a good day.
    5 points
  2. Bob, by now you should know that we do not get a dime of trailer parking, a dime of the chicken dinner and only $30 of the registration fee which hardly pays for a trophy. I will pay your gas, tolls and food bill for you to spend one day in this office to see what the massive job is getting hundreds of trophy's sent and engraved and keeping track of who wants what on each trophy. We have in fact accommodated people who asked for two names on a plate when there has been a request. All we can do is go on what our database says and we do not show co-owners. What may seem simple to you is not at all. Take your shots at our small hard working team but it is done out of a lack of knowledge.
    5 points
  3. Installed the fender "bulls-eye" ornaments. It was interesting... These are current reproduction parts. One of them dropped into position perfectly; the other was too large to fit into the base. I tried one of the original Buick parts I have; it fit perfectly. I had to grind off the chrome plating and some of the copper plating at the bottom of the emblem shaft to get the emblem to fit into the base. Once I got the emblem to fit into the base, I painted and sealed the base to protect the surfaces. Another case for OEM parts over reproduction parts... BUT, they sure look good! The eyebrow moldings are on. These are fun to install... Then on to the grille. More bling! The grille still has to be adjusted to fit "square" to the rest of the front end components. I also started working on the headliner insulation today. Measure, cut, glue, repeat. Those little bumps in the narrower piece are there because I made the first piece a little too wide. I still need to trim it around the molding retainer nuts.
    4 points
  4. I am bummed to see Sears going this direction. At the risk of hi-jacking this thread I'll preface this post by saying that I drove one of my vintage Corvettes to work the day this happened. I just want to share a positive "brick and mortar" story with you all. One of the businesses I own is a restaurant/bar in Palm Springs, CA. A while back (along with every other restaurant/bar in town) we were having much difficulty with one of our beer distributors. For several months many owners in town, including me, were complaining to each other, much teeth gnashing, etc. In the middle of all this trouble I realized that my Budweiser distributor gave me no problems at all and my rep was a hard working girl, always quick with a smile. Well, I decided to take a quick moment to write a simple "Thank you" note to the big Bud brewery in St. Louis naming my rep, her manager, the delivery driver, etc. to say I was just happy with their great service. End of story. ....or so I thought. A month later (I drove a different collector car to work) I get a phone call from my rep's manager who asks me "Did you write a letter to St. Louis?" I told him I had and asked how he knew that. He said he'd just received a call from corporate in St. Louis wanting to know "exactly who was this small biz out in the California desert"? He went on to tell me one of the Vice Presidents and his entourage were flying out here in two weeks to visit us! Well, long story even longer, they did, we made the local news. Huge posse of Bud men in suits showed up, rolled out the red carpet for us. Declared our place a true "Bud bar" and said anything these people need, give it to them! Tickets, trips, product, etc. I can tell you I was a little more than flabbergasted. I explained that we appreciated their generous offer but we just didn't need anything, really. We were simply satisfied customers. Of course they ran up a huge tab and tipped generously. A truly great day. Several months later the Clydesdales show up out front of our place to make a delivery. Made the news again. Then a few months later I asked my rep if she could organize a trip to the brewery over here in Van Nuys for about 10 of my regulars. She calls her boss, he misunderstands and says "Book the flights and hotels" He was prepared to send us all to St. Louis! We corrected this and were happy to have a nice day trip to L.A. This year we were one of 5 spots in America to receive a Golden Horseshoe Award. Great people from a great business. Sometimes a little "thank you" goes a long way. Then I drove my 45 year old truck home.
    4 points
  5. I'm 47, and this reminds me of when I was dating my wife and I took her to some Packard Club events. At first, she thought it really odd to be hanging out with people our parents' age. Of course, a few years later she was friends with many of them and always enjoyed seeing "the gang" at Packard Club events.
    4 points
  6. 1912 Staver, All on this thread, Here are some of my thoughts to share with younger collectors about this exciting hobby, which gradually becomes an addiction- - - I bought my first antique, a 1927 Chevrolet Coach, when I was in high school in Wisconsin. My mechanic dad was pissed because I kept getting speeding tickets in my 1959 Chevy convertible with a "three deuces" big block engine, and he gave me the choice of selling the hot rod and walking, or buying the old Chevy coach and driving. He wanted an old car to tinker with I think. I made the obvious choice and "learned" that antique car as a result, and I still have it in fact. It cost $300 and wasn't a classic, but did drive like a champ. Later in time, after the children and career, I was able to "upgrade" antique cars to buying my first Kissel. I grew up in Wisconsin close to where these were made. It took me three years of digging and patience to get that first Kissel, but in time, you CAN get your dream car. My first Kissel was actually a "steal" at an auction where the lawyers had to settle an estate. Patience is what matters. Just keep watching and trying for deals. Since then I have patiently watched the antique car market for similar Kissels. Nearly all of my cars were basket cases - it takes me one to three years to turn these piles of parts into restored cars, two or three years while I was working, less now that I have retired. Piles of classic car parts don't sell easily in my opinion. My last purchase was just a couple thousand dollars, even though it is a one-of-a-kind Kissel survivor. And a Roadster at that! I've watched other similar piles or project cars sell for half or a third of what their initial offerings were. The last Kissel I know of that was offered for sale that I didn't buy,mwas an unrestored project car, mostly complete with a fresh overhauled engine, for $4000. A great bargain! Again, for the young buyer, I would counsel patience. Keep watching! As to title difficulties, in many states (half?) , you can easily get a clear title by producing a bill of sale and paying the state sales tax. Michigan is one such state. I have titled many of my cars thus. As to Canadian/USA cross border purchases, I can't address buying a car or parts in the USA and bringing it to Canada since I have no experience. But I can say that it is easy, very easy, to bring a car you have purchased in Canada, thru USA customs, to the USA. If you have a bill of sale or title, and the car or parts are "original" and over thorty years old ( I think), you give the border patrol guys a tour, spend a half hour filling out forms, and they help you and say " have fun ". There are a lot more project cars and unrestored, unattractive classic cars out there owned by us old guys. There are more of us old guys who will need to some day sell our Kissels and/or other collections and piles of parts, than there are numbers of you young guys. Those numbers say that with patience, we all will have to dump these collections for fractions of the invested values. Or our estates will have to dump them. That's morbid but I think a reality. Today as I sit here, I envy being the younger person who is interested in antique car restoration, because that future is so wide open. My thoughts! ( Meanwhile until I stop collecting, please know that I will buy your Kissel parts cars! ) Thanks, Ron Hausmann P.E.
    4 points
  7. Monday morning I exchanged a broken clicker-style torque wrench, more than 40 years old, at my local Sears store, utterly without question. I was saddened to see that you could have fired a cannon through the store without hitting a soul. I don't think the replacement will last 40 years, but neither will I.
    4 points
  8. Let me start off by saying that when I originally got onto this forum in the beginning of 2018, I had just picked up my 1933 Dodge DP 6 that I found in a Barn that sat for 27 years and I made comments about how I planned to rip out the 230 Flathead 6, put in a Dodge 360 with new running gear and rear end, put new suspension on it to lower the stance and basically go for the FULL BLOWN HOTROD LOOK because well lets face it, it is a great platform to work with for a good looking hotrod. most of the comments on the AACA Forum were "don't ruin a survivor, leave it be, drive it and enjoy it" and for all accounts my primary goal while I stacked parts has been to drive it, fix the issues and cruise it around to local shows. Well now it has been 6 months and the car runs and drives great, I have won 2 awards "Best Vintage & Best of show at a local cruise night". and while I only go about 55 MPH (speedometer not correct so I always thought it was 35MPH but GPS says 50-55) I have decided that I will be keeping the 230 Flathead 6 for the look of the vintage old car, which I plan to rebuild in the winter and will not be lowering the car because the gangster look with the 4" white walls all work out with the stock stance. as for the drive train, I may swap out the rear end "I will keep old rear end" to get some speed for freeway travel and distance to shows, wineries, and events that are a bit further than a 55 MPH car can get me. I did come on here to get info and a lot of you have some good info. but I do want to say that while many are not open to the ideas of ANY CHANGE due to being 100% purists, I do feel that a bit of upkeep and upgrade is required on these old cars. so we will have to agree to disagree. I do want to say that I may have been a bit hostile in the beginning because as a person who has never owned an old car that is in such pristine condition, it can be frustrating to have a regular conversation with people about this or that when the only opinions that are thrown at me were do not do this or that. so THAT being said, I am back on here and look forward to hopefully having some constructive conversations with you all in the near future.
    3 points
  9. * * Greg, what a great gesture! I try to leave everyone with a smile, and like you I thank people for the good work that they do. We all have a bad day every once in a while. A pat on the back goes a long ways! Great job!
    3 points
  10. I agree, it all comes down to the individual. As many older gents are crooks as young ones.
    3 points
  11. * * Bob, why do you always try to pick fights with our club? Do you realize that changes can be made by the Board of Directors? You need to step up to the plate and volunteer to help change the problems that you think need changing. Better yet, why not ask to be on the AACA Board? It's easy to make strange statements from the outside, why not try it from the inside and help make changes. I will tell you from personal experience, it is hard work to keep AACA heading in the right direction for the benefit of all members! Wayne
    3 points
  12. Yep, Bob there is always room for improvement and we keep trying. As I explained to Tim and tired to explain in this thread you cannot enter a meet with a car as a couple. The software just does not allow it and it is a long story why it does not but it is for good reasons. Our custom software is amazingly complicated as it has to do a lot. When we can we try to accommodate a member individually and have done so in the past. To give you an idea of how much work this is for our staff. Getting home from the AGNM we had to unload the entire trailer that was filled from head to toe. Merchandise had to be unloaded, counted, put back in inventory and checked for damage as well and brought up two flights of stairs. Well over a hundred trophies had to be brought in, inspected, repackaged, and prepared for mailing to members who did not come to the banquet. Over 450 award plates had to be individually engraved with owner's name and car info, then oxidized, packaged and put in the mail. This is not automated, just one guy sitting at a machine. We pride ourselves in getting this done in only days but it will not happen this year as we have the Elegance this weekend and most of the staff are involved. In the meantime everyone has the regular day to day job and have to answer phones, mail and do other items to serve our members.
    3 points
  13. I've heard that that a late 1930s DeSoto overdrive transmission is an easy (no cutting, machining, etc.) fit. Apparently you can swap the top cover and shift lever of that transmission with the original one. Then use the freewheeling control cable for the overdrive control. If all that is true then it would be a whole lot easier than fitting a T5 and you'd save having to worry about coming up with another way to get a parking brake.
    3 points
  14. As a follow-on to MCHinson's post, I joined AACA and one of its regions 55 years ago as a college student. There were three guys my age among the region's members, and all are still active car guys. However, our levels of involvement ebbed and flowed with work, military, family, and home responsibilities. The friendships and mentoring from the older members were superb. I believe there are three fundamental requirements for active participation in the old car hobby: interest, time, and disposable income. If the interest is there, you will come back after attending to the necessities of life such as those mentioned above. During two concurrent careers, I "maintained" but couldn't be as active as my interest wanted. By "maintained," I'm referring to having one or two ordinary drivers which allowed me to exercise and improve my mechanical skills on a limited basis, and to participate in some club activities. I retired at 55, did some consulting part-time, and then had available the other two essential elements of time and disposable income. There are certainly exceptions in which younger people are actively involved, but career and family demands have a lot to do with it. Glittering generality: For many if not most, car collecting is not a young man's game for the reasons cited, nor should we expect it to be. We can and should stimulate the interest of young people but recognize that they have more urgent business to attend to. An example of younger folks: I have a nephew from 2,500 miles east of me who used to spend a month with me on the cars while he was in HS and college, and drove my cars at several Pierce-Arrow Society meets. He's now 35, added a second BS and one MS degree while working full time, and has purchased a home. He visited last fall with his fiancee and we went for a ride in my 1918 Pierce which he had not seen. After a few miles, I stopped the car and asked him, "Do you still remember how to double-clutch?" He got that same sh*t-eating grin as when he was 15 years old, got behind the wheel and drove 20 miles. He'll be back in a few years....
    3 points
  15. hi mate this is my baby. shes original and unrestored ive had it for 3 and a half years now and i love it. and my dad owns a 1932 dodge sedan to but a hot rod his car is attached to.
    2 points
  16. It's curious that whenever someone runs for the Board of the Buick Club, they stress the need to get young people involved. There are also numerous threads on the topic. But, as soon as someone suggests the lack of young people in the hobby will send prices down, we get all these first-hand accounts of how there are plenty of youths.
    2 points
  17. I also think that is reading a little too much into it.
    2 points
  18. 2 points
  19. Bill, I have followed this thread from the start and I have not seen anything suggesting the OP is self centered or has a convoluted sense of entitlement.
    2 points
  20. The shoes on my 1925 are similar to Masonite or a fiber composition.
    2 points
  21. On my '18 they appear to be a sort of Bakelite. If they get sticky, I rub a touch of Vaseline on the aluminum surface the run on. I'd be surprised at aluminum because aluminum on aluminum is a bad wear combination - but I dont really know about the newer cars.
    2 points
  22. No grease on my shoes,but I can`t remember if its aluminum or other material?(maybe brake linings material?) Leif in Sweden.
    2 points
  23. Jack M, that's why I carry so much stuff! In the last 20 years of touring, I've done one condenser substitution, one coil substitution, and one rotor replacement (latter on another guy's car) on the side of the road. On my dual point distributor cars (Pierce 8s) where you can't see to reset slipped-adjustment points without removing the distributor head, I carry a spare dist head with pre-synchronized points, which can be swapped out in 5 minutes. Began to do that AFTER one instance of spending an hour trying to get a decent-enough point adjustment without pulling the dist head. And these spare parts also keep the tigers away!
    2 points
  24. I'll be swinging through south Texas on I-10. Staying in Van Horn 6/17, then heading north stopping at Carlsbad Caverns. If all goes well we should roll in Tuesday afternoon. I know I'm driving what most of y'all consider a "modern car" (1991 Reatta), but it's still a 27 year old car and can be prone to issues. This will be the second cross country trip for this car (bought it in Colorado in 2016 and drove it home), and I think she'll do just fine.
    2 points
  25. If your thinking about putting in a 3 speed w/overdrive I have one out of a 36 Desoto I would be willing to part with.
    2 points
  26. Hey PreWarQc, great to see a guy interested in the "nickel" era. I do not own a 1920s car but historically have always thought this period was a very interesting time. In the old car world it is also a place for bargains as the cars of, say, 1915-1927 are now rather overlooked as you probably know. Consider our earlier advice to join a relevant club like the AACA (or the VMCCA or Horseless Carriage Club which I am less familiar with). Remember what some of us said about club members selling to club members. Meet some local car people too and let them help you in your search. There should be few also looking for 1920s cars unless you befriend a speculator looking to buy and "flip" such a car for quick profit (but he should be able to find an easier target). Go to shows and study the club magazines and bargains will begin to appear. Be selective, you may end up with more possibilities than you expect. Hold out for the best car you can afford but do remember that the owner of a 1920s car cannot be totally hands off. Even with a previously restored car you will need to have space and capability to perform some maintenance that local mechanics will be totally unfamiliar with, there will not likely be a guy in your neighborhood to help fix your vacuum tank. Good luck, Todd C
    2 points
  27. My life's experience has taught me the opposite. There are a lot of old people ready to take advantage of the young ones. Lots of old farmers around here with their mattresses stuffed with money and they will get the fish hooks out of their pocket fast if they think they can "steal" something. This topic mentions cars that have been sitting for 20 to 40 years. It ain't young whippersnappers, still wet behind the ears, or greenhorns that has owned those cars for so long. I saved this pair of pictures that I found a few years ago because it really related to my experience. "Well, Elmer, you really cashed in on those city boys. I almost busted out laughing when you said you were going to use the money to fix up the Porch." We had coffee up at the convenient store this morning, ages 93, 85, 79, and two 70 year olds. I told them about this topic and we all agreed you gotta watch out for old guys, especially the old farmers. Bernie
    2 points
  28. I have never even seen those before,? What material are they made of.
    2 points
  29. It seems we share similar taste in cars....... PreWarQc........my dream car is the one in my avatar....... .......and there ↓
    2 points
  30. I've seen your advertisement, and I agree it's a cool car, but I think this forum thread on your car from last year probably explains pretty well why the market isn't responding at that price point. It's a good example, though, of how a nicely restored CCCA car can be had at a reasonable price.
    2 points
  31. So I got the wheel back together and mounted it with the front hub. It spins to within 1/16” of the inside rim of the felloes so I’m happy with that. Took a pic to show how I measured it just in case I haven’t explained myself properly. Ran a steel rule of the spring. Cheers Matt
    2 points
  32. 2005, is this the first set of tires you are buying? How many miles do you expect to put on it in 5 to 7 years? If under 50,000, then buy the cheapest tire since it will dry rot/age out before it wears out. I have been running the cheapest available from local tire stores for 30 years. Never an issue. Name brands, yes, issues! Michelins that shed treads like trucks shed recaps. BF Goodrich that thumped and vibrated, balancing didn’t work....? Now if the wife autocrosses..., buy for performance!.?
    2 points
  33. Hahaha. Do you know what KMA stands for? No joke, there are a bunch of crooks out there who try this on gullible old people. The moral of the story is don't fall for it. hahahahahaha. Now let's be serious: The man asked a sensible question and was looking for opinions. I don't know how he can make any sense out of all of these conflicting opinions, but that was his purpose. And entry was trying to give a valued opinion based on over 60 years in the hobby since I was 16. All of us should have been serious in trying to provide a valued opinion. Most of us have, some have not. We need to welcome each new person into this hobby no matter his age, status, education, ability or any other reason. Just my opinion folks. I'm outta here.
    2 points
  34. Left for Toledo (Perrysburg) Ohio this morning and immediately after crossing the Bridge realised I-75 was under construction going south bound and would have to deal with the Detours putting me way behind schedule. Finally after 35 minutes of slow heavy travel hit the end of it and found the open road. One has to go by the Monroe Nuclear Generation Plant on the western end of Lake Erie. Today the steam off those two towers were just hanging there. I arrived at Jim's shop after lunch and immediately saw my transmission on end waiting for the universal I had brought with me from one of my other transmissions. Jim dunked it is some gasoline and discovered that he was not happy with it's condition so reached into his stash of parts and showed me what a good one was supposed to be. Decided to make notes as I watched him put the joint on the transmission and then the torque ball seal as he talked about various hints to install and protect the drive shaft seal when installing that etc. Jim is a great guy and knows dynaflow's intimately. It's well worth the cost and effort to have him rebuild one! Once loaded in the bed of my truck I had to say good bye as I had an event at 7 pm. Didn't waste any time and coming into Detroit I started to cross the Bridge for home. I came around the curve and right away noticed the trucks in the right lane slowing way down on the uphill climb. There are four lanes on this bridge and at 4 o'clock they had markers out closing one of the on coming lanes to Detroit making three lanes going into Canada. Both truck lanes were stopped almost 3/4 across to Detroit and the cars were slow moving at the very top of the bridge. Man is it tight up there! Once over the top I had time in the slow traffic to take this shot. Not my first time on this thing but it is a suspension bridge and you know it is when the trucks move over those expansion cracks as your vehicle actually feels the spring in those cables! Remember this was build in the 30's and I know it has a full time maintenance crew/company but... not an easy feeling at times. Can you believe they used to allow paying people to walk on this? Fortunately home before my wife with time to cleanup for the event later. I'm extremely pleased with the appearance of my unit and sure it will perform as new due to Jim's expertise. Now, Have to decide if I take the next step and bolt it in place suspending it while I take a few years to rebuild the motor or... Store it on a dolly off to the side and then put everything in as one unit???
    2 points
  35. 2 points
  36. PreWarQc, glad you're sticking around....... Regarding hobbies like golfing or fishing tons of money are spent without any discernible financial gain but, nevertheless a lot of people spend thousands doing them. By the way.......bless you for the work you do.......it has to be very draining. Anyway, you haven't specified exactly which pre-war cars interest you so I (we?) have no idea how primitive you want to get. A number of 20's cars have been in the doldrums so are more affordable. I JUST got my '24 Dodge Sedan sold which took the better part of a year to accomplish and, yes, I lost money on it. (The buyer is a 30 something with a 3-4 year old son........they're going to have a lot of fun with that car!) But the money lost is more than made up for by acquiring my dream car.......a car I never thought I could or would own. If you have some mechanical aptitude there are plenty of affordable 20's cars if you aren't seeking perfection. Sadly for you, currency exchange wise, our (U.S.) currency isn't doing you any favors if you were to find something state-side that appealed to you. At this stage of your life money is most likely an enormous mitigating factor for almost everything you do. Been there and done that. THE reason I didn't get into cars until I did is much of my life was involved in antique tractors which is how I spent nearly every "extra" dollar I had. By the time I sold my shop I was so burned out on tractors I didn't want to even look at one for the better part of 2 years........I sold all of them except the two I use and made the shift to cars. Best move I ever made.......it was like I got my life back in order. It seems collectors have a collector mentality that forces one to collect SOMETHING and once we're in we're ALL in. Good luck with whatever decision you make.......
    2 points
  37. I saw one like this in a private collection last fall. Bob
    2 points
  38. I'd pay to see that guy on Phantom Works do one of his brake tests on one!
    2 points
  39. Been off this project for too long, my self imposed due date is 4 days away so an updated finish time is now Labour Day. Yesterday and today I have been installing and trimming the excellent battleship linoleum, walnut brown, I purchased from Tony Lauria in Pa. The ring you see is a repop from Gregg Lange in Mi and is called a floor thimble. It helps in lifting the main floor, gives you something to hang onto. I have one in my 1913 Buick but was missing in this 1915 McLaughlin, the beautiful plate which surrounds my shifter and parking brake I received with the project but am still missing a moulding around the exhaust cutout. Easy to replicate though. The mouldings are from L and L, a company which I believe is out of business. The windshield is finished and installed, the two buttons at the bottom center are tube nuts which, should be plated but to me that looks odd so they will be painted black. The handle inside is also black and is stamped with the name of the manufacturer. I erected the top I got with the job because I needed to measure the total height, 81", 5" less than the height of my trailer and 3" less than my 1913 Buick. The serial number of the car is stamped in large type in the front seat wooden, riser board and on a brass plate nailed to the floor. The total restoration, so far, two weeks short of 3 years, a big job, but doing everything myself, in my home workshop is a rewarding experience. Regards, Gary
    2 points
  40. I always look at hobby stuff as disposable income. No different then a vacation, a concert or sporting event. Of course i try to maximize the money when selling but it is what it is. Choices as Ed says. We spend on things other than cars but I dont feel guilty about what i do spend as other, higher priorities come first. Ed is a pretty sharp guy although you gotta watch those CCCA guys when they start invading the Model T part of the hobby!! ?
    2 points
  41. Yep....the other day I saw a Model A go by and my camera was in my lap instead of in my face.
    2 points
  42. Thanks for the replies. I've already broken off all the staples by twisting them until they broke. I like the rivet idea and I'll most likely go that route since I'll have to rivet the division channel back into place.
    1 point
  43. That car is a STUNNING ride....... ........and I LOVE the front suicide doors! They make getting and out so much easier.......
    1 point
  44. First, you need a wiring diagram for your car which shows the location of the two or three fusible links and their respective values. I'd start with the small (2nd) wire emerging from the positive battery terminal--look for deformed insulation but it may not necessarily be visible. Best to have a full shop manual for your car. With a wiring diagram, I'd work backwards from the cigarette lighter power circuit. I had an interesting experience with a later GM car, a 1975 Olds Cutlass owned by a lady friend, which had been the victim of an attempted battery theft/switch at a parking garage (the thief apparently touched both terminals of the battery with a pair of pliers, shorting the system -- he dropped the pliers; sadly they were cheap ones). The shop manual told me that there was a master circuit breaker just above the driver's kick panel, which when reset solved the problem without replacing any fusible links. The lady friend was MOST grateful! You're working blind without a full wiring diagram.
    1 point
  45. I bought it. Very nice car, honestly described.
    1 point
  46. Greg, I thought we were talking about cars? yes 100 year old horses are ALL dead now............... that was mentioned earlier in another post
    1 point
  47. Just bought some Cooper tires for our 2013 Dodge Grand Caravan. So far, very good ride and reasonable price.
    1 point
  48. I guess you never went golfing, AACA is a great deal!
    1 point
  49. Also cobbled together some running board brackets, may not look like much and will never be seen, but they work and are pretty strong, at least enough to not flex at all when I stand on them ( a svelte 6'1, 225). just some 1x2 1/8 wall rectangular tubing, some weld nuts and some 90* bent steel plate, (slightly prettier than angle iron) I had from work, and the only place any money was spent on the running boards, some 1/2-13 weld nuts and flange bolts Some weld nuts for the bottom rails of the running boards. the rails are just quickly stitched in and will get final welded later on, this was just sort of a test idea I had and wanted to see if it would work. the front outside bolt mount will get a shim to kick it up a hair so it sits flush with the front fender and I still need to trim a few spots where the sheet metal of the board is hitting the bolts on the frame bracket.
    1 point
  50. Here are pics to prove it actually happened!..................
    1 point
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