Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 04/24/2018 in all areas

  1. Might make you Finnish before you get started.
    5 points
  2. almost done with the rockers,? next will start with doors
    5 points
  3. As some of you may or may not know, Sandy Jones (OCM....outlaw car man) passed away unexpectedly in February. Sandy was a wealth of knowledge on 1933 Buick's and helped out quite a few people here on the Forum. His wife, Karen, is now going to be selling Sandy's prized 1933 Buick Series 90 4 door 7 passenger sedan. As many of you know, Sandy's car is one of a few that exist and was purchased by E.I. DuPont for a mechanic that helped him secure a contract with the US Navy to keep sailors cool on the naval ships. That contract was for a new product known as Freon 12. I will be posting pictu
    4 points
  4. Overall, our site has been behaving very well but this article today is worth sharing. Thanks for reading. Amazing number of replies at Hemmings and they were all very positive towards this post. The internet isn’t always a friendly place. No matter where you navigate your browser these days, it often comes down to this: people love to argue, infused perhaps with what Roger Waters called “the bravery of being out of range.” Hemmings isn’t immune from this, and no matter how much we try to avoid politics and other sensitive issues in our Hemmings Daily articles, sometimes thi
    4 points
  5. I used the Stewart warner green line gages because they closely matched the factory instrument gages. Plus I used aluminum gage pods to get the angle right.
    4 points
  6. Had the Electra out on Saturday, touring a fellow Buick owner from Brisbane Australia who was in town for a few days. Felt like more miles, but totalled 38 miles of around town driving. Car behaved well, but I fear it's time for some transmission work as the 1-2 shift is quite late and hard. At any rate, up to 41 miles so far only. Odometer reading at the start of this challenge is 77,435 (just so I don't forget!). One of the best parts of the day was watching people walk right by a brand new Bentley to look over and get photographed with the Big Buick while I watched from a distance!
    4 points
  7. I got the '60 Electra out Sunday morning and ran it up to the other end of town for the New York State inspection. Joe, the mechanic, put the sticker on for the 16th time. 86,109 miles, I think it had 69,000 when I bought it. Then I took my Wife over to the next county for lunch at the place on the town square. I like the white on that car when the sun is just right in Fall and Spring.
    4 points
  8. Thanks Randy! Indeed that paint is drying very fast. Today, “just to see”, I sanded and polished the roof because it had some dust particles, plus a spot barely visible where I did repairs before the paint. Fortunately, all those imperfections are gone. The frame was painted black this afternoon; I will let it some days to dry before I will begin to assemble all the parts you see in that attached picture. The frame, the main body and some small parts are stored in another place.
    3 points
  9. Think she would just about Finnish me
    3 points
  10. 3 points
  11. Thanks Ronnie, I will check out the seals and pins. But I think Cargirl is right, I should just buy new units.
    2 points
  12. That's how I do it. September is oil change and lube month. Otherwise it is visually inspect each weekend. That's about 1000-1200 miles a year on the Electra and something less on the other old cars. I never completely lay them up for storage. A point to consider on these "barn finds" that show up frequently; not many of those cars stored for decades went into storage with a fresh oil change, usually the extreme opposite. The acids can easily eat away 1.5 to 2 thousandths of babbit material. A couple days after starting they can rattle pretty good. And the rings lowest in the bore,
    2 points
  13. Pete, ♦ Your pictures are not of a 1953 Buick Super/Roadmaster 12-volt solenoid. There should be a Part Number stamped on the passenger's side saddle-mounting flange to identify what your solenoid fits. ♦ The 1953 Buick V8 starter and solenoid assembly was a poorly designed, one year-only model for the first-year Buick V8. Parts are not interchangeable. 1954 starters were definitely a better unit due to the internal wiring/compound fields. ♦ You might want to have the lady verify if she really has a 1953 starter before she spends any $$ on a solenoid. ♦ A quick way to d
    2 points
  14. Do you store the car for the winter there? I’d guess not, but if you do, I’d change the oil just *before* storage. Combustion products in the oil can turn things corrosive as it sits, so fresh oil is better for storage. Otherwise, just change the oil once a year with a good quality conventional oil. Either use oil with ZDDP (zinc phosphate) in it, or add it at every oil change to protect your cam & flat tappets from eating each other.
    2 points
  15. She looks like the type of girl that won't let you Finish
    2 points
  16. This morning, I decided to complete the exhaust system installation. The entire exhaust system is nice and solid, but the muffler and tail pipe have been together long enough that I am sure I would have destroyed the muffler attempting to get them apart. When I removed the exhaust system from the car, I cut the tail pipe just behind the muffler so that I could get the exhaust system off of the chassis. Recently I installed the front of the exhaust system but had not re-attached the rear section. To be able to weld the cut section of the tailpipe I had to lower the exhaust system a bit to get
    2 points
  17. Have him find a glass shop close by. Any shop should be able to do it, and if not don't use them for anything else.
    2 points
  18. I told you that big block would fit. No problem.
    1 point
  19. Some of you are not familiar with Mopar fans and Mopar restoration. Compared to what I see people working with daily on the Mopar forums and pages I frequent this car is beautiful! If I was a younger man I would jump all over this, dip it in industrial strength cleaners and do a mechanical update then drive the snot out of it. And that price is not out of line for a documented Hemi 4-speed car....
    1 point
  20. I would definitely swap hem out to see if you bought a defective unit, sounds like you did. Question: Why install a used part when that item is available new?
    1 point
  21. I am not a fan of mechanical oil pressure gauges. I have one in my toolbox to use as "diagnostic equipment", but I don't leave it on a car any longer than necessary. That little plastic tube makes me very nervous. You can probably still get copper, but copper work hardens. If you use copper be sure to make a few loops to take up any engine movement. Years ago a co-worker of mine had a Cadillac with a white interior, and one of those 3-gauge kits with the plastic tube. One cold winter day he started the car, and while it warmed up on fast idle, he went back inside. He came back out
    1 point
  22. The elephant engine is KING of the musclecar era. If you have ever driven one of these, or stood next to one when started you would know why. What a great car. Somebody will buy it.
    1 point
  23. Think I have some of the knurled nuts you are referring to but it may take me awhile to dig them out. Not sure if I have a dozen.
    1 point
  24. KongaMan, Well said, especially the underlined sections...
    1 point
  25. Carl Flipping the manifolds would not be possible since they are attached to the exhaust manifolds. The carburetors are actually attached to the exhaust manifolds and feed up through the heat exchange. I have seen log style manifolds fabricated with down draft Strombergs. This is also an option that I have been contemplating. I pulled this picture off the web of a 16. I can’t remember where, but I think it was in museum somewhere in the Midwest. The second picture is of the 12 that I am building. Alex
    1 point
  26. I've never had that Ronnie. Sorry I can't help.
    1 point
  27. 3:82 gears may be to high geared for overdrive. It may bog the engine depending on your hilly road conditions, tire diameter, and tranny. My 35 Chevy standard had and only came with a 4:11 ring and pinion set. That calculated me at around a 3:00 in third with the overdrive engaged. I have a 1939 - 3:72 rear out of a Chevy Master 85 I was going to use in my car but then I would have to loose my mechanical brakes, and 5 bolt lug pattern. (Yes, I like my mechanical brakes). No reverse option with overdrive. Lloyds set up is safest way in my opinion. I set my microswitch in front of the clutc
    1 point
  28. I would like some one to send me a over drive torque tube gear box so me and my sons and wife can look it over .broken one would be grate .My wife runs a suspension company. MY Son is a mechanical engineer. I just like making things fly !!! -kyle
    1 point
  29. I would like to study the pic. --kyle
    1 point
  30. Yes , some good roads , drove my explorer through them years back when we first came here , currently though I’d want that 1950s safarie Buick I’ve seen on here kitted out with spare fuel, tyres and a sub machine gun rack! And instead of my usual Buick tee shirt a Kevlar vest! ?
    1 point
  31. Perhaps I'm missing something? If the vehicles are parked in strict chronological order of model year manufacture, will they not be parked in the same basic orientation as the BCA 400 Point judged classes? To do so correctly, might designated parking space assignments also be needed? Hand out maps of the show field to spectators so they can go directly to the vehicles they are most interested in, not having to "wade through" others in the process. Within this parking arrangement, member-vehicles of each BCA Division could have appropriate signage of this fact, including the BDE. BUT, this
    1 point
  32. The ad says it was parked in 1978. When parked, it was just a 12 year old, out of style, gas guzzling, used car that had been drag raced (read: mechanics beat to death). Just be happy it wasn't scrapped back then.
    1 point
  33. Spinney, I had one of the rod bearings off but neglected to get the number before I installed them. I'll try to get them from the machinist and I'll post it here if he comes through. Hugh, No shims on the mains. I used 5/16 rope seal on the rear main. Chuck
    1 point
  34. Ernest Loera.html Can anyone hear the audio by clicking on that posted link ????????????? I have never attempted this before.
    1 point
  35. Larry, The plugs that were in the engine were AC 78. They were NOS when I put them in. The engine seemed to run OK with them. You are right, the plugs that were made in the 1930's were 7/8" thread with 15/16" Hex. These Titans are 1 1/8" Hex. The Titans do not have any longer or shorter reach into the cylinder, however, the insulator is a tad bit shorter that the 78's, so there will not be any issue with the plug cover. I am anxious to fire the engine up to see how it runs with the new plug wires and plugs. I spent the better part of the whole afternoon getting everything put back
    1 point
  36. All of the cars I take to meets recently are 'driven' or 'display'. All were previously judged, I proved a point that 7 years of work that I did myself will get you a Senior; I also proved that you can get Senior on a driven to the meet car; I had a blast doing that and will fight to keep that available to others. Many of the 'driven' or 'display' cars are retired judged cars. I fail to see how someones' idea of 'fun' is affecting your ability to have fun. Who gives a rat's ass how many are judged...you do I guess.
    1 point
  37. I use a product called Bleach-White and a small scrub brush, has worked fine for me. I have also used something called Magic Eraser.
    1 point
  38. A car mentor once told me always by the best Model A you can find........because it costs the same as the worst Model A you can find. A bit of a stretch, but not far off.
    1 point
  39. I think this girl is Finnish.
    1 point
  40. The horizontal top bows, the chicken wire, the cotton batting, and a black kind of imitation leather/vinyl(really a rubberized fabric) is EXACTLY the way it came out of the factory in 1929(Ford and 30 other American carmakers). It's called the Top Insert . You should get a catalog or go online for Mike's "A"-Fordable Parts, or Mac's Auto Parts Model A catalog for the right stuff. Though you can get cotton batting at a quilt store and chicken wire at a farm & ranch store, suppliers like this sell it all. They call the waterproof fabric "cobra long grain roof material" in the Mike's catalog(
    1 point
  41. OK Ladies and Gents, Here is how I rewired them per Tinindians helpful link.
    1 point
  42. 64 coral mist https://www.ebay.com/itm/Buick-Riviera/123086523624?hash=item1ca8874ce8:g:7aUAAOSwKhta15vr&vxp=mtr
    1 point
  43. Sombreros and Lancers. If you were or are a "Kemp" from the fifties, these were sweet.
    1 point
  44. I bought this '55 Roadmaster from an elderly BCA member in Baltimore, MD, ten years ago. It is not a show car, but a fun driver. Lots of power options: antenna, seat, windows. Even has the foot switch for the wonder bar radio. It is a fun ride! Shown parked outside my office last summer after I replaced 35 feet of heater hose! I love the Dyna-flow!
    1 point
  45. Wow, I have done two changes in my coupes. The only “special” tool needed is a typical “‘slam hammer’. The magic end is a three forked end that stays expanded to grab the inside of the outer bearing. Quite often you can get one from yoir local tool rental store. I have found in both of mine that pulling the outer seal lets the outer bearing come out without crazy effort. I can go to the shop I use and take out their tool and send you a picture of it. I am attaching my rear bearing replacing task. My left side came out fairly easy. The bearing was still lubricated but still I pull
    1 point
  46. I'm signed up to go back to Wray Schelin's Pro Shaper shop for another 4-day session this coming weekend. I want to finish off the cockpit section and get started on the tail at Pro Shaper. I've been frantically working to get the tail buck done. The old wood buck from circa 1980 that I bought served as a starting point, but doesn't really have enough detail. I'm not sure how a new tail for the #37 car was made using it. I got the major part of the rear section together, but need to add the steel rods that will define the seats and the forward part of the tail that mates up with the cockp
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...