Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 03/13/2018 in all areas

  1. I think they all should have their name in big block letters on all four sides so I can tell them apart....................Bob
    9 points
  2. 1959 Ford Thunderbird - $15,500 Factory Original Paint. Original Weatherstripping Is Holding Up Very Well. Solid Clean Uni-body Floor Sections, With No Rust Issues Or Corrosion. Updated Exhaust System Excellent Running And Smooth Ford 352 cid With 4 Barrel Carburetor, Rated At 300 HP Smooth Shifting Automatic Transmission With Column Shift Effortless Power Steering Stock AM Push Button Factory Radio Day And Night Mirror 140 MPH Speedometer, Showing 94,xxx Miles Factory Gauges With Clock Drivers Side Rear View Mirror Windshield Washer System Padded Dash Repainted In Stock Factory Color Of
    6 points
  3. The Amazing Traveling Ferrule Tool Gary W. was kind enough to lend me his ferrule seating tool, and I used it to good purpose today to properly seat the door handle ferrules on my car. I had previously ordered new ferrules (and rubber grommets) for two of my doors from Steele, but I didn't realize at first that the ferrules had to be crimped in order to be properly seated until I learned that from Gary's thread (a source of knowledge for us all). Here's what the ferrules and rubber grommets look like for the '41 (a bit different from Gary's '37): On the '
    5 points
  4. David Landow's latest restoration wins a major prize at the Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance. The restoration is over the top and the attention to detail and authenticity simply astounding. The award was presented by the head of GM styling at this weekend's show of over 300 spectacular cars. Even this Olds guy was wowed by this great roadster.
    4 points
  5. Not as much strength in those square corners as opposed to radius/rounded like stock. Square corners have a higher tendency to crack/break the reason for so much extra support in the middle. Just my opinion. Tom T.
    3 points
  6. Be sure to get a battery tender that charges at 3 amps or your optima battery will explode.I bought mine at walmart and it will work on 6 or 12 volts.I pulled started my 25 Buick today and adjusted the carb and ran it at a fast idle for 2 hours.We first pulled it without the plugs and the oil pressure came up and sent oil all the way up to the rockers.It ran cool with no overheating problems.I did a final valve adjustment after it warmed up and the engine runs great.Now for the sad part it still won't start with the starter.This is probably something simple but at least I know the engine is
    3 points
  7. Since this thread has become quiet I will tell you what I have been doing to get ready for my first start of my 1915 165 cu in engine. All the advice on oiling is not appropriate for me, I have no oil pressure. My oil pump lifts oil to the sight glass and then drains to four connecting rod troughs. So after the oil pan is filled to full I then add another gallon of 10w30 which will flood the engine and top up the troughs. Then with no spark plugs I spin the engine over to splash oil into the catch basins over the main bearings and around the cam and lifters. Then I drain the excess oil
    3 points
  8. Hello, We just started parting out this 1953 Buick Special two door hardtop. It is loaded up with goodies including a very nice grill. Please private message me if you need any thing. thank you.
    2 points
  9. All, Thought that I would post up a few pictures of a unique, one-of-a-kind Kissel that has just been re-discovered. This car was purchased by an individual in 1971 and, after being used in a few parades, was parked and stored. If you are a student of Kissel history, this car is loaded. This car is an ORIGINAL Kissel Model 6-45 Gibraltar Seven-Passenger Touring. When Kissel changed its name from "Kissel Kar" to "Kissel" and changed its chassis and engines from Model 6-38's to Model 6-45's in late 1918/early 1919, they had a lot of left-over large bodies from their unsuccessfu
    2 points
  10. Haven't got the vicky home yet. I'll probably keep the distributor on the car... I just had to get this 31 vicky because I drove one in high school back in 1964..
    2 points
  11. Just came back from a 60 mile drive... I am speechless. She pulls now like a freight train, no more smoke out of the exhaust, idles like a sewing machine, gear shifts are so smooth, you can hardly feel them. The Bilstein, comparing to Gabriel and Monroe, are night and day. For a car of this size, they work wonders. Much more stable, with a comfortable sport feel. I still have a slight squeak from the left front spring, but nothing like before. Springs will be next.
    2 points
  12. Not my place to say auburnseeker, you would be better off getting yours running good, and cashing out of it. Kick in some extra cash. And buy a running driving Auburn/Cord. Just from a cost stand point. You know that. If you are in love with the one you have, go for it.
    2 points
  13. Never bought them in fact I seldom buy parts store premade lines. I prefer to make my own from a roll of tubing. I can get the exact length I want, making long ones in one piece and can have them in a day. There is a technique to doing this that I could tell in a few minutes if anyone is interested.
    2 points
  14. Fastenal will not insure it for breakage if not in a complete box/crate. I think "breakage" risk on this is pretty slim. I'd strap it to a pallet and send it on. I got a 322 and dynaflow from the midwest for $150 through fastenal! You can get a quote here: https://www.fastenal.com/en/22/3pl-(third-party-logistics)
    2 points
  15. Trash bags (folded up) make pretty good turntables to put the wheels on. Jack stands do work great for the string. You will need to space the strings out from the wheels with something because the bodywork will be in the way. I used oil cans, but they don't make the right kind of oil cans anymore. You'll need to find something of a predictable size. It really helps to know ahead of time that your wheels run true. 2 cans per side at the back and careful positioning of the strings will show you if the rear axle is pushing straight, and if it is the toe can be measured fro
    2 points
  16. 2 points
  17. Tonight I rotated my tires for the 5000 mile anniversary of them. Since I had the wheels off, I pulled the drums, too, to inspect and clean behind the backing plate. The same drum that overheated last year had more problems this year! Pulled the drum and the shoe was in disarray! Hundreds of micro cracks and a large portion of material missing. The piece on the ground is the piece I removed by hand without effort. The other piece was no where to be found... good thing I had a spare set of shoes on hand! Tires rotated, brakes adjusted, bearings repacked and I'm on my way. I'm looking in the nex
    2 points
  18. The example in post #7, imho is twice the car the OP is currently considering. I would give that one some thought.
    2 points
  19. For all to know. I used a good quality awl and punched a hole in the plugs. Installed a dent puller and they all came out. Talked to Russ MArtin at Centerville this a.m. Just want to say Kudos about Russ. He took the time to give the instructions on the correct installation procedures . Also know that the cam bearings are installed correctly. I expect the new plugs on Friday so I will let everyone know how it goes. Also just want to say many thanks to all for the help. Dennis
    2 points
  20. IMHO, a 6-point socket is almost always preferable to a 12-point in any application.
    2 points
  21. I don't doubt your credentials, I just wonder about the need to re-engineer a system like this where the original is already pretty effective. Besides, it's going on a low-compression, low-RPM, gently-driven machine with pretty loose tolerances that has spent the last 80 years sucking air through the oil bath air cleaner without ill effects. Installing a state-of-the-art filtration system now kind of seems like closing the gate after the cows have wandered off, no? I understand that it's your preference and your area of expertise, but these cars lasted tens, if not hundreds of thousands of mil
    2 points
  22. This morning I did a couple of random jobs on the Buick. I cleaned up the jack parts that I have and tested the fuel gauge sending unit. I hooked up my VOM to the unit and repeatedly moved the float up and down. The sending unit seems to work according to my VOM but it is not totally reliable and consistent, so I think I will be replacing the sending unit. I was able to lubricate the jack assembly and get it where it will move up and down like it should but there was one fairly major broken chip on the jack assembly so I decided to repair it using Grey Marine Tex. I wrapped the rod with paper
    2 points
  23. Not to mention, the paint on the Limited looks pretty nice!
    2 points
  24. Hmmm. As an EE, I always like interesting challenges. So I was thinking about this and I think it could be done without changing the bulb socket, i.e. use a single line socket on the front. I am assuming the rear lights are already dual filament. Without going into stultifying detail, this situation calls for a simple state machine. Up until a few years ago, the cheapest way to implement it would have been clocked logic with a couple of relay or transistor drivers. Now, though, an Arduino Uno clone is about 8 bucks. So with a handful of resistors and output drivers, the states would be impleme
    2 points
  25. Those pictures of your 56 in the snow remind me of the 4 years my 55 spent in winters in Potsdam NY. Got the same crazy looks from people when driving it on snowpacked roads and sub zero weather. Will hunt down some pics. Had a set of Firestone Town and Country studded snow tires on it and an 80 lb bag of salt over each wheel in the trunk. That car went through anything the great white North threw at it. I can remember pushing snow with the front bumper on the way home from a Springsteen concert in Syracuse in a blizzard. No weather reports on an iPhone back then and a paper m
    1 point
  26. Might place your needs down in the Buick section. Lots of Buick folks are active there. Gary
    1 point
  27. Driver is a driver, no matter how much it costs. Just car guy talk.
    1 point
  28. Is there anything specific to Buick besides the name? Corporate platforms, corporate engines, corporate transmissions; what makes a current Buick a Buick? Three weeks ago I tried out a gently used 2017 Cadillac XTS, which is a Buick Lacrosse, which is a Chevy Impala, which is closely tied to a Malibu. I had read a lot of good reviews, but drove away without looking back. The sad part is that I walked in really wanting it to be a car I would like. I think because of my car hobby I am too closely connected to standards of the past. I am looking for the $3,500 car of 1960, the $2
    1 point
  29. I was just surfing Ebay and found someone wanting to sell a used '90 headlight switch for $ 390. Seems a little high so I thought I would bring this topic up again. Jim
    1 point
  30. There is usually a thin anti-squeak material made of impregnated woven cloth between the body and frame. My 32 DB has a different mounting system, but my 29 Plymouth was set up like your car. It had the material between the fenders and the frame. The running board splash pans had the cutouts so they could be removed without taking the body bolts out. On my car, the rearmost hole in the fender lines up with the front body bolt and lines up the fender with the body. I can't remember if there was padding between the splash pan and the frame on the Plymouth, but there was between the body an
    1 point
  31. I have been wrong more than once on this forum. I am afraid I am very hard pressed to see any real redeeming features in a Shay, however they clearly have a following. Even when they were new I failed to see anything about them that would appeal to me. But much of this thread is about individual taste and preference. Greg in Canada
    1 point
  32. ?? AFAIK, all 14 MM spark plugs have the same thread pitch. Therefore the same number of threads per inch. Can you post a picture of both plugs? Here is the AC spark plug chart I posted in another thread.
    1 point
  33. I had another thought (nightmare).....a quick look under my Reatta indicates there is about 1 1/2 of air space between the engine cradle and the body. You could rework to cradle to allow the rubber mounts to be recessed into the cradle, I don't know if 1/2 in air space would work but that would lower the front 1 in It would be a lot of work for just 1 in drop but combined with some of your other ideas, you might get it down 3-4 inches.
    1 point
  34. First thought is whether you want to keep a McPherson Strut suspension. Next the lower spring perch is the limit for tires. Dropping the offset enough to clear would have the front tires into the wheel wells on lock. Second way would the to reduce the size of the front tires to match the drop. A 1" drop would limit you to about a 24.3" tire. Might get away with stock axles but not sure. With enough time and money you could bag it.
    1 point
  35. Mis-leading headline. The article says only that the badges that say "BUICK" will be dropped for 2019. Like many other cars, Buick will rely to a greater extent on its logo for identification, beginning with the 2019 models. If you look at Chevrolet, Mercedes-Benz, Audi, etc., you will see that this is common practice in the industry. The article does not imply that Buick as an automotive brand will disappear.
    1 point
  36. Well I think that I'm going to have to agree to disagree with you on this. I just retired from working as the Facility Manager at a large hospital this past year after 25 years, I only mention this because air quality was extremely important to all areas of the facility especially the surgical suites. Air Filters are given a MERV (Minimum Efficiency Reporting Value) rating, your house has an 11 or 12 MERV rating. Over my 25 years air quality standards got stricter and a MERV rating of 18 was the gold standard. The Air Handlers were 30 years old and were designed for filters that allowed larger
    1 point
  37. If it's a Turbo Hydramatic 400 as on my long-since-sold '64 Cadillac, the upshift is controlled by a vacuum modulator screwed into the right side of the transmission case, and connected to steel vacuum tubing by a 3-inch piece of vacuum hose which deteriorates. IF you have a vacuum modulator, replace the vacuum hose, and check for oil inside the vacuum tube part of the modulator with a cotton swab. If you find oil there, replace the modulator.
    1 point
  38. Didn't track the actual mileage this time (will leave that for the fuel fill up's) but drove the Special a bit and brought her home to put her to work. (Pleasure and Work is OK). Put a rope on the trailer hitch and dragged the Limited out for some much needed garage clean up. Can't wait for "Top Down" weather!
    1 point
  39. Hope he has some thick skin. As you saw, not much tolerance for anything modified here. And those Rushforth wheels look amazing.
    1 point
  40. Rattle can rubberized undercoating.............Bob
    1 point
  41. It is stunning, looking at it from my chair in front of the PC and a whole other perspective during the summer in full bloom! Safe travels Sir.
    1 point
  42. 1 point
  43. Great day for a stretch down the PCH! Needless to say she was VERY HAPPY - AND SO WAS I!
    1 point
  44. C Carl made a good point about the oil pressure. I once had a Jaguar that pumped out a significant amount of oil onto the driveway on start up because oil filter parts were not the same as in the past. Fortunately we caught it fairly quickly, but almost did not in all the euphoria of getting a motor running. Consider on your attempts, that your first run is without plugs and pulling the car only to establish oil pressure is good. That everything has a chance to get lubricated at a low speed, and more importantly, that you have a chance to check for leaks prior to any large losses of oil.
    1 point
  45. No, they acknowledge that it is the way it is because they acknowledge that's the way it was. One cannot retroactively apply contemporary standards to history. The car is pushing 55 years old. As such, it stands as a testament to the engineering technology of the time, and the fact that these cars are still capable of functioning well in the current environment is testament to the capabilities of that technology. That's not to say that a stock first-generation Riviera represents the pinnacle of automotive engineering. It doesn't; there are clearly better cars being made today a
    1 point
  46. Here is how my car is set up. The drip tube passes through the pan and is offset from the exhaust. Please excuse the grime, it will be shined up once spring gets here.
    1 point
  47. I have a 29 DeSoto Model K. What parts do you have left?
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...