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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/05/2017 in all areas

  1. The car hauler driver said that he wants a Buick "just like this"!
    5 points
  2. Its hard to rival the color of new england. But heres piedmont of NC.
    4 points
  3. The big moment is finally here. It only took 25 years and six months. I was giddy as a school girl driving her for the first time. Thanks matt i couldnt have done it without you.
    4 points
  4. We took a day trip down to the Lake of the Ozarks today to try and catch some fall foliage but the sun was hiding behind the clouds so the colors wouldn't pop. Still got a couple of shots of some reds, yellows, purples, and oranges. The 2nd picture shows you why the wakes on the lake make water skiing difficult. ? Ed PS - you'll notice the picture was taken from the passenger's seat rather than from behind the steering wheel. My wife is capable of taking pictures as well as I am.
    4 points
  5. The majestic '38 Roadmaster is now on the car hauler, heading for Brian. Here are a few photos, documenting the loading of the car this morning here near Tacoma.
    4 points
  6. Sunday November 5, 2017: One Year Ago Today! One year ago today, November 5, 2016, I purchased my Buick. Drove it home and immediately joined this Forum, the BCA and the '36 - '38 clubs. Been a busy year so far! Here she sits, all windows down trying to air it out! Bullet holes and all! Quick Video of the homecoming! CLICK THE BLUE LINK HERE ------------------> Buick Coming Home 11:5:2016.mov <-------------------- CLICK THE BLUE LINK HERE Thanks for all the constant advice, encouragement and the many followers of my thread! Gary
    3 points
  7. Lots of brew pubs, microbreweries, tap rooms, etc. around. It is Colorado after all. Old Loveland pass is a nice drive, but I'm more used to doing it in a TR-3 rather than a 50's Buick. Disc brake probably make a big difference. For those into 'train spotting' type actives, you can sit at the top of the pass with a hazardous materials book and look up all the numbers on the sides of the semis, since hazmat is not allowed through the tunnels on I-70! I am going to try and make the Nationals if my employment situation allows, but I'll be day tripping it. The 50 miles each way is cheaper on gas than a hotel room. Scott
    3 points
  8. Saturday November 4, 2017: Updates Busy day around the house, so I didn't have a lot of Buick time. But I managed to get a couple of things done: Paint Shop Update: Front fenders have the rubberized undercoat applied to the underside. This coating will set over the weekend and the base / clear gets sprayed Monday morning on the upsides. So, using the old fender welt as a guide, I started cutting and trimming the new welting. My plan is to actually attach the new welt to either the fender or the body with double backed adhesive tape to keep it steady while the fenders are mounted. Also, I want to punch a few holes for the screws to go through just to be sure it stays in position. I hate when that stuff pulls out. Looks so sloppy. I ordered these countersunk, flanged finish washers for the interior kick panels. The job looks much better now. Just finishes off the panels nicely. Then I worked on the stainless trim molding that runs down the rear quarter panel to the trunk. First, I buffed the moldings using a slow speed wheel and jeweler's rouge. Then finished with a hand rubbing to bring out the shine. I did a "dry run" to be sure all the mounting clips were still aligned with the holes in the body, and made small adjustments accordingly. (You only get one shot to get it right!) Once I was satisfied the moldings were ready to be thrusted into position, I carefully applied a small amount of weatherstrip sealant only to the "depression" at the base of the clip. I used 3M Black Super Weatherstrip and Gasket Adhesive and just rimmed it around the base of the clip. My thinking was this will keep everything neat for installation and will seal the "business end" of the clip. I'm thinking if I get caught in a rain storm, water can leak into the trunk from the holes in the body if not sealed...... "Seal each clip and hole" I knew I read it somewhere! Had to clean the garage to find it! Line it up, check both sides, check again, start pushing the clips in.... A little persuasion and she snapped right into position. It's so nice seeing some of the finish parts going back on! Left side. Have a great day out there! Gary
    3 points
  9. I wanna know how he turned that big rig around in your neighborhood!! Thanks for the pictures. Thanks for the storage and hospitality!!
    3 points
  10. For what it is worth, divine intervention? Your '55 will look better keeping the shoes it has. And they are WAY easier to clean. My .02. Ben
    3 points
  11. Winter is effectively begun in this part of the world. The 1929 will be coming home yet too so started tidying the garage. Didn't get too far though.
    3 points
  12. This is such a happy little car. Suzanne wants to call it Hawkeye, but the children, who think of the Marvel character rather than the MASH character are fighting it. That said, it's the end of a season. I'm happy I drove it out to the country on Thursday as that was our last dry day. We now have snow and if the prediction is correct it with temperatures it won't be gone until spring.
    3 points
  13. Are the bullet holes going back on? KIDDING! Just kidding! Cheers, Dave
    2 points
  14. Fender welt: Covered here (Pg25 I think) http://www.1937and1938buicks.com/The-Torque-Tube/Volume XVI Issue 1 (September-October 1997) .pdf
    2 points
  15. I once read a thread on another forum titled "restoring for the next generation". I think you are doing that at the very least. In fact, I suspect that 70 years from now when that car is restored again, GM will get a lot more credit for the care with which they assembled cars than they deserve, based on the effort that you put into this car.
    2 points
  16. Thank you thank you thank you.!!!! After all day again I did get it. Wow that felt good I was going to give up and paint it black, now I get to spend much more and get it plated. Thanks again
    2 points
  17. We had one of those when we got married 40 years ago except it was burgundy and an Oldsmobile.
    2 points
  18. Here's a little fix that I did on the '41 this week. Currently it is laid up awaiting the return of it's gas tank, which is at a shop having a liner put in it. I had installed new shock links when I put it together 5 or 6 years ago, but was still using the old shocks till recently. I got rebuilt shocks early this year, but had not put them in as I was planning to put the taller ratio gears (3.4's instead of the stock 3.9's) in, and much of that has to apart anyway to do that. To save my aching elbow, I had the work professionally done, much to my satisfaction I must say. So I had them put the rebuilt shock in at the time. Needless to say, the ride was considerably improved, till one day I heard a banging at the back. Sliding under in a parking lot I could see that the pin that connects the link to the shock had simply pulled out of the link, but it was still connected to the shock itself. Those readers that have worked on these units will understand, but for those that haven't, here's an explanation. The shock bolts onto the inside of the brake backing plate, and a link connects to an arm which comes out of the inside back of the shock itself, but doesn't attach to the frame directly, like modern ones do, but rely on a slim vertical bar, with two shortish tapered pins. The top one fits into a fitting on the inside of the frame rail, and the lower one into the shock arm. The pins in the link are set into rubber, much like a motor mount is, and it was this which failed, and let it pull out. Also, there seemed to be a bit of misalignment of the pin to the arm. I still had the old ones, and compared the two, but they were identical. I drilled and tapped into the inner side, and put a bolt in where it goes through the link, but it worked its' way out after a short while again. So I decided to create a new modified one on my lathe. When doing the careful measurements I found part of the answer, as the taper on the shock arm was a bit larger, which when tightened up, pulled it even further out of alignment. I think that since the old shock wasn't doing too much, it didn't put very much stress on this unit, but the new ones, did. So, when making it up, I increased the gap about 3/32nds, and made the taper a bit larger as well, so that when installed it would be more in line. The biggest change was to make a stud which goes out the inside end of the link, so that I can put a nut and then a lock nut on it. There is lots of space on the inner side, the there is no issues with the stud interfering with another component. I have posted a few pictures of the manufacturing progression. Keith
    2 points
  19. Hi yes its not in USA , i am lokated in Nothern Sweden , the garage is 8*12 meter , and i have floor heating , and its isolated so i have 20'Celsius also on the winter , , the winter is so damn loooong here ... But when you have a garage and plenty of Buicks so it's ok ... Bt
    2 points
  20. So, while we were in Brookfield, I was presented with four reasonable purchase options. First, Suzanne asked me if we bought a Reatta convertible, whether we'd be able to drive it home. With the border crossing, the answer was no. That said, we did discuss one for sale...she ultimately decided not to pursue it. Then, our youngest, Joseph, presented us with a local ad (which I was somewhat aware of)...more on that later. Two friends suggested they would allow us to become stewards of interesting Rivieras...those are still tempting, but I didn't go to the National with the idea of buying another car, let alone an intent to do so. At any rate, I'd driven by this car a few times, and the colour always caught the eye, but it was far enough off the road to not be able to confirm what it was and I often went by when the place was closed. The Kijiji (sort of like a Canadian CraigsList) ad Joseph found had Suzanne pondering and she ultimately decided that, since she was still off work Friday, that we should go take a look. As it is a bit out of town I did confirm that it was still there before making the drive. The car is a 1976 Buick Skyhawk, one owner (purchased by dealer in an estate sale) who was a nurse, with just over 30,000 miles. It is finished in Concord Green, with a white and green vinyl interior. It has the 231 V6 with automatic. It has a few options, but mostly smaller items and doesn't have air conditioning (fat sweaty guy sighing). While it may have been more expensive than I'd have liked, it isn't too unreasonable considering the low mileage and overall condition. I did look at a few online pricing tools, so I didn't get too far out of hand. Ultimately, it was Suzanne's decision, so she wrote the cheque. We just have a bit of paperwork to deal with, then I can put plates on it and bring it home. I didn't really know much about these cars since I haven't seen too many. I've been doing some reading and research, and it has definitely grown on me. With three young drivers in the house, it is nice to have something smaller that is less likely to get them into trouble (says he who found out today someone backed his Electra into something solid on the after tour and bent the rear bumper) at least from a speed perspective. From the test drive, I think it's a pretty neat little car. There is some rust bubbling the paint behind driver side wheels and the passenger front fender appears to have been painted. It seems to me to be original paint, and is worn thin in a few spots. This should be a fun adventure...children are already discussing driving it to Denver next year (and missing their brother's high school grad).
    1 point
  21. It's that time of year once again for the famous London to Brighton Run. This Sunday, 5 November, hundreds of pre 1905 vehicles will make the 60 mile run from London's Hyde Park to Brighton. It's a spectacle unlike any other automotive event on earth! You can find all information about the event, including entries, and follow-up after the event as videos and photos are posted. Check it out with this link: http://www.veterancarrun.com/home Today was also Bonham's pre event auction of early vehicles and automobilia, and you can look at items and results here https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/24123/ Aside from selling a great selection of early automobilia, the vehicles offered included what has traditionally been the run's earliest starters, - a Scottish built Salvensen steam wagon. Check the auction listings for details of this amazing machine. If you love really early machinery, you'll spend some time looking over the entries and auction items. Brass is beautiful! Terry
    1 point
  22. While I have hesitated to chime in on this topic, I feel I need to correct this error. Somebody apparently lied to you about AACA judging criteria for radial tires and halogen headlights. AACA has had a lot of people complaining about how many points are deducted for those items for a long time. I have heard that for 2018, AACA is finally lowering the deduction for radial tires from 5 points each to 2 points each, but I have not yet seen that in print. Up to this time, it has been almost impossible to compete successfully in AACA judging with incorrect tires.
    1 point
  23. Adding the stainless trim really spices things up and it is fun and easy. Question? On a '38 there is fender welting only at the rear between the fender and body and none at the front where the fenders bolt to the "nose piece". Might check with the '37 experts. (If it mmatters)
    1 point
  24. My '38 Special has the engine number stamped under the water pump too. I'd expect the bigger engine to be done similarly
    1 point
  25. That is the same thought I had. I read the recall and the incidents related. People are generally stupid, especially when it comes to parting with their "hard earned money". (Personally, I have never owned a nickel of hard earned money) From the recall " approximately 16 injuries, including smoke inhalation and minor burns, and approximately 91 reports of property damage." That's out of millions. I hope the minor burns didn't keep them from putting 5 pounds of junk on their Chevy Cobalt key ring. I think it is shameful that Kidde would manufacture and market such a cheap piece of junk "just because people will buy them", but that is just my moral upbringing. Many times I have been told I am too honest to own a business. I have also been called judgemental. I would be inclined to recall the purchasers and ask them what other dangerous decisions they have made. I bet if five group photos of 16 people were spread out on a table in front of me, I could pick out the group who got injured. When it comes to people nothing is hidden very deep below the skin. I am kind of chuckling. Here it is church day and I just got home, writing this. Maybe we need a flood. Bernie
    1 point
  26. My friend used to have a Senior Six, when he sold the car a long time ago he kept these parts. If any one needs or wants them there available for the price of shipping. Contact me moose@manifoldsbymoose.com
    1 point
  27. Big milestone; looks great!
    1 point
  28. This morning, I drove my 1937 Buick Century to our local Cars and Coffee. This afternoon, I spent a little bit of time on the 1938 Buick Project. I installed the remaining two brake lines. I also cleaned up the Voltage Regulator. I removed quite a bit of surface rust on the cover, the body of the assembly, and all of the terminals. With a quick check with my volt ohm meter, I think that the regulator might be in working condition now that all of the terminals are cleaned up and can actually conduct current. I will need to do some additional research, but I think it is OK. After cleaning it up, I applied a coat of paint to the voltage regulator cover.
    1 point
  29. Here's one with a mounted tire. They are radial truck tires, slightly bigger than original but saved a chunk of cash with these as opposed to a specialty or vintage tire shop.
    1 point
  30. Would the owner of this car be interested in some free 63 parts for pick up in the Richmond, VA area? They are from a Skylark, but include wheels, radiator, and other things that would probably work for a Special too. PM me and I will get you the contact info from the email I received.
    1 point
  31. That's good info for folks to know, Doug. Over the years I have talked to a number of people that have bought parts for the wrong series, as they look so much the same, only they don't fit! Keith
    1 point
  32. If you check the existing system you will probably find that the actual spark voltage is 4 or 5 KV. If you have a lean cylinder it might get above 5,000V but I haven't seen that often. Any old coil car do 10,000 to 15,000 V. Ohms law has a lot of room on old cars. A common conversion you can look into is the distributorless Jaguar V12 conversion. Backyard jobs use two triggered 6 cylinder GM units. Jaguars draw cooling air through the distributor and it can cause moisture to rust the internal components. Rather than maintain the distributor some remove it. Just a work around for maintenance, no real world gains. If you did it all yourself the minimum is going to be at least $350. Go out and buy five sets of Echlin points and condenser. Invest the remaining $150 in a girlfriend. In the meantime read this book : http://www.jag-lovers.org/xj-s/book/XJS_help.pdf It has tons of fascinating stuff in it, even if you don't own the marque. I have read most of it at least once, lots twice or more. Maybe I need a girlfriend, too! Bernie
    1 point
  33. I priced the axle stock at less than $50. It is the machine shop labor that will run it up to $6-800.
    1 point
  34. I would be in, but it is missing the horn button.
    1 point
  35. Seller mentioned the show as we were driving through those mountains. I am currently under restoration on my Charger here is the build thread on another site http://www.forbbodiesonly.com/moparforum/threads/depoulis-1969-charger-318.131558/
    1 point
  36. Hugh There is a spring company local to me that will make all manner of custom springs. I had them make me a set of push-rod springs for the '25. Usually about $20 for the set-up and $3-5 for each after that. CDN pesos of course. I can inquire if you want . Brad
    1 point
  37. A little off subject. I was not at a show but doing an errand in the car with antique plates not meant for doing that type driving. A cop car pulls in behind me just as I have a right rear blow out. The cop put on the mars lights and I pull over, get out and see I lost the hub cap so start walking to get it. Three cops get out of the squad. I go back to the beast as they are walking around it then started asking questions about it. They then changed the tire for me and sent me on my way. No problems at all about the antique tags. I sent a letter of appreciation to the chief and mayor praising all three - one Sargent and two trainees. Received a thank you back from both chief and mayor. All well that ends well.
    1 point
  38. Not so tragic, but a funny story! The judges should have known better. Maybe that's why my friendly neighborhood mechanic doesn't wear white.
    1 point
  39. Just a note... By several accounts, the city of Portland has become too expensive for such businesses to operate. However, the Buick dealerships just outside the city limits are still thriving. Our local BCA chapter has had a good relationship with Weston Buick GMC in Gresham OR. Weston has sponsored some of the local Buick shows and has provided new Buicks for display at those shows.
    1 point
  40. I don't believe that's true. I have a friend with a totally unrestored early 20's car, he put it in the regular class to be judged, and received an award, second Junior I believe. I know the argument that all HPOF cars need to be in one place for judging, but I'd rather see all cars placed in their class, restored or not....makes for very interesting comparisons between original and restored cars....
    1 point
  41. There is a separate section on the AACA forum for parts selling and buying. Best to use the "Buick Buy and Sell" section. That's a good looking car. Hugh
    1 point
  42. I've done some driving the last couple days. They wouldn't give me the paperwork until the cheque cleared, so yesterday I drove out to get that, and dealt with the registration before I came home. This afternoon Teresa and I went out to get it. It's a more subtle/silvery green than she was expecting from photos she had seen. Of course, it had to be raining so now a wash is necessary. The Electra makes it look small for some reason.
    1 point
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