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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/30/2017 in all areas

  1. Springfield Motors Buick dealership, Springfield, Oregon My wife and I were returning home from a road trip to some of the great national parks in the California Sierra Nevada range. Last Saturday morning, we crossed Willamette Pass Highway over the Oregon Cascades, and planned for lunch in the Eugene area. I spotted the sign to the Historic Downtown District of neighboring Springfield, and remembered that there was an old Buick dealership in the area. Following lunch at the The Plank, we drove a couple of blocks to the dealership, constructed in 1949 for Clarence Sc
    6 points
  2. Gorgeous day up here in the great "green" North, so I took the Electra out for a duplicate of the trip I made with the Wagon a few weeks ago. Up the Sea to Sky Highway that leads from Vancouver to Whistler. Halfway up to Whistler is the small town of Squamish where there Howe Sound Brewery, a great spot for local craft beer and excellent food. The trip went well and as you can see from the photos, it was a beautiful fall day. The Electra performed well, although the day was not without some drama. On the way home, the car sputtered and died while doing 60 mph... I coasted to th
    6 points
  3. Your pictures are awesome Doug! When I see pictures of the western parts of this land I often wonder" What did early settlers think when these areas were first observed?" As to your power loss, I am thinking water in the gas. However, this requires an assumption that the vehicle may have been left to sit a few weeks with less than a full tank of gas. BTW, This one deserves to be in the Favorite pictures of my Post war Buick!
    4 points
  4. Nice day down here in central Texas. Put the carb back on the car after a rebuild and went for a ride among the cattle and horse ranches. Ended up at a distillary that my wife like and bought her some Prickly Pear Moonshine. Car ran better then it ever has in the 2 or 3 years I have owned it.
    4 points
  5. Thanks very much John, I always appreciate your insight. The car does sit a bit, so it's possible there is some water in the fuel, however it was very close to full and I use only non-ethanol fuel. The road is quite curvy with a lot of grade change, and I may have been pushing it a bit in sections to pass slower vehicles. At the point the car stalled, there would have been 1/2 tank so I'm leaning to some fuel sloshing around in the tank and sending a small piece of debris through. In this part of the world, the mountains basically come right out of the ocean, so it definitely w
    3 points
  6. All convertibles flex to some degree in fact every car will flex on a lift. I have personally used a lift on my 53 Buick Convertible and 53 Chevrolet convertible, they flex, and gaps change, doors will still open and close, never had one just open. I just talked with an owner of a 55 Chevrolet convertible, he had a transmission removed for repair the shop used a lift, gaps changed but returned to normal on the ground. Follow Al’s advice and confirm the frame has the stiffeners, then check your body mounts are they tight, then check for any rust in the rockers. The floor and rockers are a bi
    3 points
  7. Sunday October 29, 2017: Some odds and ends Installed the hand accelerator pull knob. It was hopelessly rusted together, so I had to cut it just after the metal sleeve inside, then restored all the parts that show. I don't think I'm going to use it as originally intended. I'm thinking I may use it as a separate light switch to turn the Trippe lights on. But it looks nice back into its spot anyway! Windshield divider installed. I s l o w l y tightened the screws to allow the rubber to seat fully without bending anything.
    3 points
  8. Welcome! Always great to have another enthusiast! While posting descriptions and pictures here will certainly get you some good feedback, I would suggest an alternative. Joe P mentioned the lack of competent mechanics today for sixties cars. How do you find one? Many areas have weekly/monthly/semi-annual whatever cruise-ins, often at the local arf-and-barf (a.k.a. fast food "restaurant"), but also a local park, car dealer, etc. Attend one or more of these cruise-ins. Look at some of the sixties cars you see. Talk to the owners. Most car enthusiasts will be g
    3 points
  9. Just to put into perspective for the newcomers to this story.... here's the after:
    3 points
  10. Our local Portland area chapter toured this dealership on Sandy Boulevard in Portland several years ago. I am told it was to be replicated by the Smithsonian Museum before it was sold & remodeled. The yellow sedan is now my son's car, and the roadster belonged to Jack & Barbara Gerstkemper at the time.
    2 points
  11. Putt around or parades? I'm not a Navy man, but me thinks I saw a shot across me bow? Well we do, do some putting and parades but we also have a bunch of fun on the open road too in our stock Buicks and drive. Nothing against Modified Buicks or Modifieds in general, heck I own one with a bow tie on the front . . . but I digress. Well here are three stock Buicks in Baraboo, Wisconsin on the PWD After Tour this past summer. Each had a bunch of fun at the BCA National Meet along with a bunch of Buick cars and trucks and wonderful Buick Folks I don't h
    2 points
  12. I'd call it the Mr. Earl Retirement fund collection!
    2 points
  13. Here's the original "in home" charger or maybe it's something from Frankenstein's lab. It will be restored as well but not made operational for safety's sake.
    2 points
  14. I made this valve cage from scrap 3/4" square tubing and a long bolt. Remove the castellated cage retainer nut and spring assy. Liberally lube the cage vale with 50/50 ATF & Acetone for a day or more. Remove the top nut & washer from the puller. Insert the valve stem into the bottom hole, place the heavy top washer over the stem & replace the keeper. Turn the lower nut to pull the cage assembly. Some valves may require just putting a strain on the puller for a day or more with more lube and/or heat.
    2 points
  15. A different kind of tri-five with no bow tie.
    2 points
  16. Later... took a closer look at the Mercury Marauder pics and it is rustier than I thought. The Plymouth would be the better buy on condition. The Mercury looks like it needs a lot of work.
    2 points
  17. Gary: If you are using a remote/hidden starter switch that that would be fine. But if you are planning on using the original vacuum accelerator starter system the hand throttle is important. Many a time if you stall on a hill and the parking brake will not hold and you start drifting back..... Foot on the brake, pull out the throttle which will engage the starter. Back in business. A real life saver... Ask me how I know! Larry
    2 points
  18. Could probably work as a learning exercise. Maybe you could become the next Rube Goldberg!
    2 points
  19. I love to see 322’s in hot rods From a friend on the west coast and he has this Century minus the above engine for sale.
    2 points
  20. Just brought in this 1918 Rauch and Lang electric for full restoration.
    2 points
  21. Wondergrape, That is good. AACA has the Ohio Region with several chapters that tour with their cars locally for day trips and three times a year tour with all the chapters. We had a wonderful Ohio Region tour two weeks ago in the Dover, Ohio area. Besides wonderful back roads in Amish country, we toured a tear drop trailer manufacturer and private collection with 30 plus cars including a Duesenburg, Packards, Caddys Kaiser Darrins, T Birds etc. The guy had two large buildings for the cars set around his nine hole golf course and his house. Most of the cars on the tour were 50- 70s
    2 points
  22. Check with Universal Vintage tire company, Hershey PA. They have universal black walls for about $300 and they have Lester white walls on sale for $260. Great company to work with. Bob Engle
    2 points
  23. As to where to buy, I always buy privately. Preferably an original unmodified car from a good neighborhood.
    2 points
  24. My choice would be a well maintained original car not restored. There are plenty of decent old sixties cars around. Suggest you start with a lower priced model that is simple, with a small V8 or six cylinder engine and the minimum of power accessories. I like Plymouths and Dodges, in fact all Chrysler products. But there is a lot to be said for Chevrolet and Ford, especially when it comes to getting parts and repairs. Really though, I would not turn up my nose at a good Pontiac, Olds, Buick or Mercury at the right price. There are some good buys out there especially in the less p
    2 points
  25. Probably the last run for the Electra until Spring. As if the car knew, it decided to strand me for a few minutes on the side of a busy highway with not much of a shoulder! Was able to get it restarted after 10min or so and made it home without any further problems. Not sure why it stalled, but nothing like losing power doing 60 mph on a busy, windy mountain road!
    2 points
  26. Welcome, Mr. Wondergrape! Any good dedicated hobbyist is happy to help a newcomer. I don't claim to be a mechanic, and I'm well involved in the hobby; so don't feel that mechanical prowess is a requirement to owning an old car. If our furnaces break, or our television stops working, we're likely to take it to an expert. Everyone has different knowledge. Consider buying a good price guide. One well-respected guide is the price guide put out by Old Cars Weekly. Here is their annual book: https://www.oldcarsbookstore.com/2018-collector-car
    2 points
  27. I certainly have no issues with using a 60s vintage car as a daily driver (I'm doing that myself) but understand the issues so you do this with your eyes open. If you are not doing the work yourself, you will have to find a VERY reputable mechanic who understands these cars. Depending on your location, these can be few and far between. While these cars are not complex, most "mechanics" today are only "parts changers". They plug in the scan tool and replace the part that the software says to replace. Sometimes this fixes the problem, sometimes it doesn't. None of them could diagn
    2 points
  28. Even if I was quite lately, work is continuing. It's not making sense to show each filler application or sanding!. The main body (rear fenders, roof, doors and trunk lid) are at 95% satisfying. I still have some improvements to do, especially at the cross panel between trunk lid and back window. We had a wonderful October month; therefore, I could do most of the surfacer job outside. Today, we said goodbye to the summertime and hello to the wintertime, the weather is getting cooler and humid. I ordered the paint for the leather; it’s water based and I have to spray it with my airbrush bec
    2 points
  29. Dave, great stance without abandoning the stock theme. Thank You for the info regarding suspension, front end alignment and handling. The 63 I have would look great 2” lower. The reason why I won’t lower my car is I have knee and back problems that make it a challenge to get in and out. Of course, I could go the expense and have it bagged. I won’t do that because the expense is something I don’t want to pay. Looks r e a l good tome because you have it all. Great Riviera style with a mod that does not fall out of the stock theme. My Red Riviera on a nice autumn day is attached.
    2 points
  30. Success strikes again ! Got the carb put back on the car this morning and the car started right away. I found it helps you if put the throttle return spring on. But it ran and after doing some minor tuning we went for a drive. Car drives like it has never driven before. Good response, not bogs, hesitation or backfiring. Idle needs some work and I have to reset the choke, but for the most part I am happy. It drives like my Riviera did. I should have done this a long time ago instead of chasing imaginary ignition gremlins. So now I have new points,. wires, cap and rotor
    2 points
  31. Took the truck out for a short drive today to put in the workshop for the winter work. When I say short I mean short, a couple of miles.. It was 37degF/ 3deg C today.
    2 points
  32. MCHinson, Streamlining an event does not guarantee it's end. The demise of a swap meet is having to walk 20 miles to see 9,000 swap spaces and there are only really 5,000 spaces being used for vending. Or showing up to a car show advertising 9,000 swap spaces on Saturday and there are only 1,000 spaces being used because the vendors just decided go home . Why don't they add the real information in the advertisements. 9,000 swap spaces is no where near the truth. Open 7 am to 5 pm is also not true? Wednesday through Saturd
    1 point
  33. What a treat that must have been for you and your wife Brian!!! I know that photo of the '59 had to bring a big smile to your face. Thanks for sharing!!!
    1 point
  34. A few more thoughts on the topic. I would stick to cars from the 1967-1972 model years. 1967 was the first year for a number of federally-mandated safety features, including dual circuit brakes and collapsing steering columns. 67 was also the first model year that disc brakes were pretty much available across the model lines (though they remained pretty rare until the early 1970s). Yeah, I'm aware that some cars offered these features earlier (Caddys had the dual circuit brakes from the 1962 model year), but 67 was the first year they were mandated and available across the board
    1 point
  35. The monthly magazine Hemmings Motor News and its accompanying website, www.hemmings.com, are the most respected places to buy and sell collector cars. You'll find everything there from $3000 to $300,000 and up. And they vet their advertisers, so anyone found to be dishonest or unreliable is prohibited from advertising again. Mr. Wondergrape, we ask again: WHERE ARE YOU LOCATED? With members' keen and knowledgeable eyes, we might be able to find some interesting possibilities fairly close to you.
    1 point
  36. That looks like a potentially good candidate, Mr. Wonder-- but Auburnseeker's caution about "body redone" makes me wonder too. The pictures are of very poor quality, so it is hard to tell. Unless you're quite close to car's location, I would request high-resolution digital pictures. That will save you from wasting your time. Also, phoning the seller and talking to him will give you an idea of the condition of the car and the condition of his character. ANY car you expect to buy you should see yourself and test drive, because even goo
    1 point
  37. Fall foliage in the low country of South Carolina
    1 point
  38. i have a 1929 4 door doge brothers . don't know if u need any thing pitchers demotions if it is close enuf for cross reference anyway kyle
    1 point
  39. mines not my primary transportation.if it dies i will have triple a tow it home where it can sit years if needed.i just found out today that my van may be MUCH cheeper to fix than i was hoping.i might go the route of building a bullet proof auto like the other guy did.id like to be able to tow a camper.
    1 point
  40. White on white. L was cut off on the above link. https://oklahomacity.craigslist.org/cto/d/1966-buick-riveara/6337612101.html
    1 point
  41. Buy a new seal. Keep the old one to make sure the new one matches in design. I will leave the installation question to others.
    1 point
  42. A comment was made on another thread about not underestimate the excavating work. No truer words can be spoken. I way under estimated the time to really get my site finished up. Not even Grass and flowers but just the amount of work to flatten a spot on a hill, then the drainage for the building and proper grading of the whole area. Seems all I do is get everything levelled off or graded properly, then dig it all up for something else. I put stone in for the drainage of the eves, fortunately only on one side, when a friend told me i really should use a coarser stone without the du
    1 point
  43. Shackles all finished. Rebored and bushed to take out the wear, zinc plated and painted. Thanks to Bob B for the parts, they look a bit different now:)
    1 point
  44. Looks like the same calendar picture has been turned into a placemat!
    1 point
  45. The older I get the more I notice there is a special way to say "original" in car talk. One has to extend their neck slightly so their head is a little forward of their shoulders. The they drop the "o" to say "ridgenole". That is done with a slight lowering of the head and a bob that rises upward at the end that turns into a positive nod. All this happens with a slight glazing of the eyes. This became apparent to me when I noticed people weren't saying "original" the way I originally heard it said or the way I say it. However , it is very entertaining to be able to predict it. Thi
    1 point
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