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  1. Day 6 - Part 2 Last night we stayed in Seligman at the Supai Inn. Another example of an old Route 66 motel that is well-maintained and sought after by Route 66 travelers. Leaving Seligman, we headed west and stopped at the Grand Canyon Caverns. This attraction is located on private land east of Peach Springs. The Grand Canyon Caverns have nothing to do with the Grand Canyon but they are a large expanse of deep-underground caverns left behind by water erosion of limestone after what is now the Pacific Ocean receded from this land hundreds of
    7 points
  2. Hello Tom and everyone else following along. I was planning to dedicate a post to thank the incredible "support team" out there, whether they know it or not, Everyone who has taken on a project of this magnitude knows how much it means to have people to lean upon when things aren't going quite as expected. When you find yourself in the weeds. When you feel like you've bitten off a little more than you can chew. Or. as Tom asked, when things go wrong completely out of your control. So I guess this is as good a time as ever to thank some people that have been so great through this res
    6 points
  3. Well, if anyone is interested, I made it. The longest day was yesterday I drove from Manteca Cal to Newberg Oregon stopping to visit friends for an hour or so about mid way. Was driving from 9:30 am till 2 am. long day, 633 miles at 55 to 57 MPH. Started raining just about the Oregon line. One of the wipers fell off so limped to an O'Rielys in the dark rain in Grants Pass and a nice kid there helped me to cobble something together. Had to fish around under the dash to hook up a defroster hose and all was fine. I did stop often to check oil and kick tires. I also m
    3 points
  4. Continuing with the Snow Cap in Seligman, a few more pictures. Here is a picture of my wife trying to bribe me not to take her picture inside the store... And some scenes from outside the store. It just doesn't get any more kitschy than this... Not far west of the Delgadillo business, The Rusty Bolt. Tonight, we dined at the Road Kill Cafe here in Seligman. Route 66 doesn't get any better than this. But wait, there's more... Da
    3 points
  5. A friend sent me a text last week while he was at a swap meet and found the Buick Hawk below and was I interested in buying it. I said yes and now it is mine. I am guessing it is some sort of dealer service award as there was evidence of adhesive along the front as if there was signage, plaque etc. Nice walnut base and the letters and hawk are in excellent condition. I played with it in front of the 1932 Buick Anybody have a guess about its purpose or age?
    2 points
  6. Good stuff Dan! Love the pictures and narrative for each. Great adventure! Keep it coming! It is also nice to hear the 49 is running like a champ. Trusty back in 49 and trusty today!!!!
    2 points
  7. And he never checked his ad to add the needed information! Newcomers should know that this is a DISCUSSION forum, not a newspaper where you place your brief ad and wait for the phone to ring.
    2 points
  8. Greetings and Welcome to Super Wildcat world! I'm glad to see this one show up on BCA site. When doing the research on 65 Wildcats from Sloan Museum documents I found there were Super WIldcat Production: 117 4-doors 327 Coupes 107 convertibles This is interpreted from the daily production sheets available from Sloan Museum. Here is part of my fleet- the Sea Foam convertible is a original Super Wildcat- sold in Cincinnati, still here!
    2 points
  9. I just did some work on this truck. It has a newer bed on it. I think this bed flows pretty good with the older cab. Some of the blending of old and new, can look good. It does get harder when the truck cab is from the 30's-50's
    2 points
  10. Someone doing a 'Day Two' restoration on their 1975 C10 short box will take those wheels off your hands and free-up some restoration cash!
    2 points
  11. You would need to live in the North East to really appreciate the type of cars and opinions I have formulated after seeing them around here. I wish we all lived in a nice dry climate. I just see rust problems and it being used more like a band aid around here than the way you use it. As I said in a vehicle the caliber of yours there wouldn't be suspect of it's use, but around here I can only imagine the number of cars it's been used like undercoating to hide problems. Solid around here means won't fall apart before you get it home. Solid in dry areas means no rot usually. It's just a wh
    2 points
  12. Chuck, Mid-to late-1970s Buick sales catalogues are full of the hawk insignia/trademark/whatever you call it. I interviewed the photographer a few years ago, who took the hawk photographs for the sales catalogues in the 1970s. Early 1980s Buick brochures also use it. Pete
    2 points
  13. Yes, that's exactly the issue. I went through this with '36 and '38 radiators. If I recall, a modern core was about $300 which included labor. One thing I didn't like was the call from the rad shop telling me my cores were rotted and wouldn't survive rodding. I later learned that rad cores were scrapped at nearly $2/lb at the time and the shop didn't return mine and I didn't know to ask. Also, I've long gotten past losing this part of originality. Joel
    2 points
  14. I went ahead and took the new regulator out to my shed where both my car doors are stored. I held up the power regulator to the door and observed that it should work fine. However, it looks like I would have to template a whole new set of mounting holes on the door to have it installed correctly. I also looked at the master body parts book to compare the illustration with my part and my part is identical to what is shown in the book. So in conclusion, I am pretty confident that I have the proper power regulator for my car.
    2 points
  15. I would hit "like", but I really don't like that.
    2 points
  16. Not mine, passed on bu a fellow forum member. Located around Rochester NY. Called the seller, says it was stored for 30+ years in a warehouse and is solid. Also says his son ran it without oil and the engine seized. (more likely failed to prime the oil pump after sitting 3 decades and the main bearing went) Says firm at $5000. In Casino Beige, one of my fave '54 colors
    2 points
  17. Going to a school dance in my high school days my older brother gave me the honor of borrowing his car and let me take his 1970 GTX 440 to pick up my girlfriend at that time. When I went to return the keys to him later that night my arm kept twitching and caused the keys to drop in my coat pocket... Damdest thing,,, the twitching would only stop when ever he would let me drive it somewhere... He sold it in 1978, the twitching hasn't stopped since
    2 points
  18. Today was the Buick's day off. Here is how she spent the day at the motel. Today we road the Grand Canyon Railroad from Williams, AZ to the Grand Canyon. What an adventure. The Grand Canyon has always been considered a Route 66 attraction. In the glory days of the Mother Road, it was an easy decision to make to see the Grand Canyon while you were "making that California trip" because it was only 64 miles off Route 66. So close, why miss it? Here are a few photos our travels today. The train at the depot in Williams, boarding passengers.
    2 points
  19. I think those belt holders are the cat's meow. If anyone can give me a lead on where to get them, I'd appreciate it. They look like a U hook that the seat belt just buckles up to. Neat, keeps them out of the way.
    1 point
  20. Resembles a bumper car...
    1 point
  21. Жопа драггер Нужны новые пружины
    1 point
  22. Check the ground to the sending unit. You may have to drop the tank and hope it's the sending unit.
    1 point
  23. Finding out that something will work at this time of night always makes for a good night's sleep!
    1 point
  24. Roger7, I don't know what would cause the hard spot unless there's a set screw there that's binding because the king pin is trying to rotate instead of the spindle rotating around the king pin. I'm surprised the heat didn't loosen it up. I've never heard of a prefit bushing for these. But, if you have a local auto shop that's been around for a while, they would have a king pin reamer and would fit it up for you. It's also easy to do yourself. You can find king pin reamers on eBay - you need to know the size. Maybe others will have some more helpful advice for you.
    1 point
  25. I had a similar problem with my `36, good and tight but it wouldn`t take grease. I pulled the king-pin, someone had put it in upside down so the spiral grease groove didn`t line up with the zerk, flipped it over and everything is fine..
    1 point
  26. $700 seems like a bit much. Maybe de-rust it and dab some solder on it?
    1 point
  27. I like the seat belt holders on the console. Very handy. My silver Riv has them too. I figured it was a one-off but now there are two. Was this a dealer add on?
    1 point
  28. Or as Beldar Conehead says.............".Eggs and fiberglass "...................Bob
    1 point
  29. He Drives a Duesenberg. He Drives a Riviera. He drivers a Riviera. Yes, it's mine.
    1 point
  30. Wow, now thats a lot of Red. Wonderful! There are multiple Riviera Bobs? Probably like 5 of them at least?
    1 point
  31. Any girl looks good behind the wheel of there beauties
    1 point
  32. Hmmm, several things over the years, but guess these are the highlights. 1. Got in my Sunbeam Tiger one day to go to work, backed out of the carport, turned the steering wheel to the right, the left upper a-frame broke into, and down I went ! 2. Bought a new 1969 Fairlane Cobra, and during a "showing my wife how it runs" drive on the very day I brought it home, when I wound it out in 2nd gear and shifted to 3rd, the Thermactor system cannister blew off ! Huge noise ! Removed the entire smog system that weekend and threw it away. I know, I know you don't have to tell
    1 point
  33. Like time travel, Ben. These are cars used in the 50's and 60's - all restored. Riding the train was almost as much fun as driving my Buick. Dan
    1 point
  34. My pic of the day: Blondie and an beautiful Electra 225
    1 point
  35. In a confined space, Carbon Tet will put down more fire than $10,000.00 worth of Haylon. If you don't mind killing everything that breaths air for a mile down wind, Carbon Tet will work outside where Haylon won't. When Carbon Tet meets fire it becomes Phosgene Gas, it was used to kill a lot of people during the First World War and outlawed for fire use shortly after. So long as the dammed thing is empty you can't go wrong. If you ever see this, or anything like this, or a liquid filled glass ball (usually red) that hangs from a mount that will melt and let the ball fall and break
    1 point
  36. Thanks for sharing, Terry. Maybe people have more interesting items to show. In terms of purchasing power, 29.9 cents in 1965 is the same as $2.33 today, so actually, in many locations, gas is actually CHEAPER today than it was in 1965. In many places, gas is in the low $2.00 range per gallon now. (Thanks to oil deposits being found all over the country and beyond.) But back then, you may have gotten a trinket--and full service and a smile too.
    1 point
  37. HAW! HAW! HAW! I'll probably get a nasty-gram from PITA.............................Bob
    1 point
  38. Nah, keep talking to them and waste as much of their time as you can. From time to time I get a phone call from "Microsoft" informing me my computer is infected with a virus. I act appalled and concerned and ask what I can do. They send me to my computer and try to talk me into giving them control. For some reason I can never quite follow their instructions and have to keep starting over. When I think they have about given up I tell them that my computer is up but there is still something wrong. It's now displaying a picture of their mother performing a sex act on a German Shepherd. Pisses th
    1 point
  39. My great grandfather's Lozier taken in 1913 while touring Europe.
    1 point
  40. This is me from about 1952. I have my baseball and glove, sitting with two neighbor cuties on the back bumper of their parents' 1950 Plymouth. This is known as "the thorn between two roses".
    1 point
  41. Give the daughter an heirloom to brag about. In my opinion the bragging rights far exceed the monetary value. Wayne
    1 point
  42. I am pretty certain there were no actual blankets made that were designated as "rumble seat blankets". It is probably just one that she remembered as being used in the rumble seat of a car she or a relative owned. A lot of early sedans had a robe rail on the back of the front seat to hold a blanket as the early cars were quite drafty.
    1 point
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