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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/05/2017 in all areas

  1. Something is definitely wrong in that last picture.
    4 points
  2. Following is a photo of me driving the car in the parade that day. I was only three, so my young father was worried that I might have some kind of accident. He reminded me again and again to maintain the exact same distance between me and the brass-era touring car ahead of me...stopping when it stopped, and resuming whenever it moved again. Of course, he walked the entire parade route keeping pace with me along the sidewalk, just in case. That's him in this photo.
    4 points
  3. Here's my 1919 Locomobile Sportif, restored in the original paint, top and upholstery colors and patterns -- and yes, with whitewalls. I have several factory photos of brand-new Locomobiles with whitewalls. For a somewhat conservative car like mine, the whitewalls make it stand out. It had blackwalls on it when I bought it, and the car just looked dull.
    3 points
  4. Carter, as well as some other carburetor companies, used velumoid for gasket material during this period. Velumoid tends to shrink over time. Generally, if one looks down the throat of the carb, one will see the airhorn gasket where it has pulled away from the castings because of shrinkage. Same is true for the bowl cover gasket, although one is unable to see this gasket until the carb is disassembled. As Grimy mentioned in the post above, the leather accelerator cup should be oiled. If one does not have access to castor oil; neetsfoot oil, sewing machine oil, 3 n 1 oil may all be used. Also, you should see the caption "oil under screw" on the dust cover. A couple of drops of the same oil as used on the pump should be used here. We generally include a gasket set with any new old stock carburetor of this era for the use of the customer. Jon.
    3 points
  5. Well, here's a "Winter Buick" in Michigan. Snug as a bug in a rug! Hurry up Spring!! Dave
    3 points
  6. Bio, Just to add my $ .02, have you considered putting a "diaper" under the front cross member. I use 1/3 of a bath towel folded neatly and held in place between the 2 rear a-frame struts with a couple of black zip ties. Shhhhhhhhh. Change the diaper before every show, and I don't leave spots. Mike in Colorado
    2 points
  7. I have been torn ... do I stay with the simplicity (probably how it was built) or add the bling?
    2 points
  8. A word of caution about using a certain bus line to ship large items. Cheap, yes. Nice folks, yes. Tracking, NO. Once you wave goodbye to your shrink-wrapped treasure, it could be 3 days or 3 months before it reaches its destination. It will be taken off the bus in strange and exotic places and left on the floor for hours-days-weeks, until an employee gets tired of tripping over it- and sends it on its way. On my last fling, a seller shipped me 2 fenders from the left coast to the right coast. The same seller shipped 2 other fenders to the center of the country. Guess which fenders I got? Yes, one of the wrong ones arrived at my local terminal. Lucky for me, the guy in the center of the country got a hold of the bus company VP's cell phone number and started calling him non-stop. So, one Sunday morning my phone rings and it's the VP- asking for my help. I agreed. He sends another high ranking bus employee to my house on Sunday, in his personal vehicle, to pick up the wayward fender. The fender gets a "special ride" to the center of the country to shut up the speed-dialer. A week later my fenders are in my driveway- in the back of a taxi-cab!?! In the end, the bus line moved heaven and earth to make everybody happy. But the whole affair lasted a month; and there were many times when I was convinced I'd never see those fenders. So if your stuff is truly irreplaceable, think long and hard about the bus. JMHO.
    2 points
  9. LOL. Well, here goes. The year was 1957, and the Soviets had just launched the Sputnik satellite, which some of you may be old enough to remember. There was a lot of concern and apprehension in our country at that time. My dad was a sheet metal worker, and he built the body for the car, and a "missle," which he mounted in a wagon, painted green to match my "Shamrock Special" car. Then Mom lettered a sign reading "Middletown's Sputnik" for each side of the car. When I slowly towed past the crowds along the street, people laughed and howled and applauded.
    2 points
  10. Tried posting these earlier, no go. Cropped them all and wahla
    2 points
  11. I'm having the same thing happen Mike. When I go to make a post the text from my previous post is still there. But I figure it best to deal with one fubar at a time. Seniors have their privileges.....like AC and no scoops in a 55-48... ya know...
    2 points
  12. It's been a little cold up here in Seattle, to say the least. (this photo is old, I forgot this thread existed! lol)
    2 points
  13. I personally never had the problem until Lamar asked me to try and post. I think Matt W may be on to something. Maybe not the only problem, but it can't help. Wait... what? That's right, my earlier answer is still here as if I can only make one post per thread. Sidebar: Did anybody else notice that Senior 55 Century with the chrome slider bezels? (Post 70, pic 4)
    2 points
  14. And here I take my old Bugles to several senior care places for the guys to read. Guess am missing out on the big money
    2 points
  15. I backed the 47' outta da garage and dusted her off. Let her run for about 30 minutes and put her back away. 60 deg f in the garage so she is fine. Forgot to take pictures
    2 points
  16. Ben, The through bolt is a piece of all thread with a nut on each end. The plate the "half moons" are mounted is a 3/16 plate. The half moons are from Vintage Air. Modified to fit. The plate is mounted on the two front head bolts. Ben
    2 points
  17. Save yourself some grief. Get a fresh kit and take it apart for inspection and replace those 70-80 year old gaskets and pump leather.
    2 points
  18. 2 points
  19. My participation in antique car hobby began in the fifties. I have dash plaques from events I attended in 1958, riding in my parents' Hupmobile. My earliest car-hobby memories began when my dad and some family friends made a little gas-powered car from lawnmower parts. I drove it among a line of antique cars in a St Patrick's Day parade in Middletown, Ohio in 1957. The car was well built, and I drove it around the my grandparents' place for several years. My mom painted it and added details. There are lots of stories from that little car, and the special rocket that I towed behind it. ANYWAY, I remember the old blue Dodge pickup truck that my grandpa owned, which is shown in the background of this photo. That old truck hauled me and my cousins all over my grandparents' property, and into town and back. I loved riding in the bed of that thing. I ASSUME it's from about 1939 to 1941, but I note that it seems to have a soft roof in the photo. Any responses will be much appreciated.
    1 point
  20. The chrome piece between the 2 windows should have a gray or black rubber piece at the top. It looks like your chrome piece is somehow further down inside the door than it should be, and missing the rubber tip. If it is hard plastic, the interior pieces were just painted with regular Ford paints.
    1 point
  21. I'm thinking 1910 Buick maybe....
    1 point
  22. I bought my first Reatta [1989 Red/Tan coupe] 10 years ago. I had been looking for some time and all I found was junk. I finally found one in Florida that I thought was good and the guy only budged $200.00 off his price of $4400.00. It had 111,xxx miles on it with less then perfect paint and a "pink" interior and he was up front with telling me it was needing stuts, strut mounts, and tires. But it had "the Show" and was always dealer serviced so that was good enough for me. I flew down to Tampa bought it after a test drive from the airport [he picked me up] to his house and then for me home to Wisconsin. I found out later he had put some serious cash in it [Tranny, A/C compressor, etc] which is why he would not come down in price. Turns out I had a great car [I was the second owner] that other then cosmetic has been very dependable. Glad I bought it. So what I am saying is that if it is a good runner/driver continue to knock off the price what you see as "bad" and maybe you will end up with a great car for a fair price that you can just fix the small stuff as you go along.
    1 point
  23. Here's my wide whitewalls that may have come with the car, as they are Martin Custom Tires, size B-16. Mike in Colorado
    1 point
  24. It pays to shop around for used or new-old-stock parts. One place may be cheap for something and expensive for something else. I recently bought a used horn (by mail) from Baker's Auto in Putnam, Conn. (Phone 860-928-7614). I thought I was buying a used part, but it looked perfect when I got it. When I needed a part for the power door locks a few years prior, though, they were considerably more expensive at Baker's. Lincoln Land is in Florida, phone toll-free 888-546-2727. I have never ordered from them, but they were recommended to me. Also: If you look in the magazine Hemmings Motor News, you should see ads for numerous parts suppliers.
    1 point
  25. Sorry, I should have mentioned in post #72 that when my photos didn't upload I was using my pc and had already put the photos on my desktop so I was dragging and dropping them. Most of the time when it didn't upload I could drag and drop the picture a second time and it would upload. Once it didn't the second time either and I gave up on that picture. Carl
    1 point
  26. The grille in the truck does not look right either. Maybe grandpa did some custom work on it?
    1 point
  27. Stephan, If you can post some pictures of the spark plugs along with the "antifouling extension" we would be able to better help you diagnose your car. Pictures of the engine areas that you talk about are also helpful. Also, have you done a compression test? That would tell you a lot about the condition of the engine. (added) When you do the compression test, be sure to post the numbers for each cylinder here along with the values before you add oil to the cylinders and after. Also we all like to see pictures of new acquisitions by forum members.
    1 point
  28. The 39 Dodge pickup was changed from the 38 to this basic styling. Plymouth also had a pickup that was a near twin. The head lights were still bulb under glass in 39 mounted in the valley between the fender and the hood. 40 trucks had sealed beam head lights, still in the valley. In 41 the head lights were put up on the crown and the center grille trim was changed slightly. This form was brought back after the war for 46 and 47. This truck could be any year from 41-47. The truck shown was labeled as a 41
    1 point
  29. Yes, directly from each phone. All uploaded with no problems.
    1 point
  30. Nice day today had the car out so I took a few photos to update on the progress.
    1 point
  31. 1 point
  32. 1 point
  33. jkindel, you want the 14th edition, printed in July 1 of 1920. The next one, 15th edition was printed in 1922. There will be two originals in the AACA library soon, can be accessed by their online catalog. There's a 13th edition there now, printed in April 1920 but you should wait for the 14th. Apparently something significant changed from April to July to cause them to print another manual. But then nothing changed much until 1922.
    1 point
  34. 1948 Willys Jeepster Phaeton 1948 Willys Jeepster ad The Jeepster was an automobile originally produced by Willys-Overland Motors from 1948 to 1950. It was the last phaeton produced by a major automaker. The original Jeepster (VJ) was first released to the public on April 3, 1948. Offered only in rear-wheel drive, the vehicle had some trouble gaining traction with traditional Willys customers. The 1948 Jeepster was powered by the “Go Devil” 62 hp, 134 cu in straight-4 engine, with 3-speed manual transmission (with optional overdrive), drum brakes, a single transverse leaf spring suspension and rear driveline similar to what was used in the Willys Station Wagon at the time. This 1948 Willys Jeepster Phaeton is an older restoration that is continually maintained by its current owner. The pictures should clearly show the cosmetic condition and runs very well and drives like it should. The owner is selling for other interests. This Jeepster is located in Smithfield, RI and is ready for immediate enjoyment. Asking $12,500. Tons of pictures on my website: http://www.tomlaferriere.com/listings/1948-willys-jeepster
    1 point
  35. iPhone 4s 1-2 my files will try windows phone next
    1 point
  36. I personally never had the problem until Lamar asked me to try and post. I think Matt W may be on to something. Maybe not the only problem, but it can't help.
    1 point
  37. Unfortunately she likes very little jewelry. (I think I've only bought her 5 or 6 pieces in 13 years.) No Randy you are very fortunate ! If you have room for it and it doesn't make a dumpster diver out of you AND you have the good feeling about it. You know what I mean, the ' gut feeling' when you look at a car.....................
    1 point
  38. Watch fob or key chain with a 1950 Buick crest.
    1 point
  39. Finally got some decent pics. She's never been re-painted. Lots of little scratches. Still got some detailing to do. Purists - don't mind the red-lines please. All reversible.
    1 point
  40. The last time that I checked unless you own a trailer queen... You drive them then the cycle is 1. Drive them, 2. they break, 3. fix it. 4. return to 1 and repeat the sequence as long as ownership is retained and you drive it.
    1 point
  41. Looks like you have the "RED" phone. Are the rumours true that it is a direct link to the president ? Nice set up and nice to see the little one so interested. Looks like he has the bandana ready to rob the mail car. Cal.
    1 point
  42. I would think you would be able to Tour just fine. Note my comments above on speed in my first/original post. 35 MPH +/- 5 MPH depending on vehicle and driver. How well does your 1927 run, can you maintain 30 MPH on a open road, and can you run ~100 miles on a Summer day with several stops? Contact me at the email in my Signature. Happy to help. Food for thought for others thinking about the Tour: It does take prep work. It's one thing to roll a car on and off a trailer and it's another thing to head out on a Tour. It's also a lot more fun to Tour. If you have never had your vehicle out for a 100 mile trip, I would strongly suggest you do that before the Meet/Tour for your own peace-of-mind and touring pleasure (and so you don't become stalled entertainment for the show field 'experts'), and so you are not spending the afternoon waiting for the flatbed to come and fetch you on Tour if we can't get you back on the road. Does it run well? Tuned? Lubed? Does it cool? Do all the fluids stay where they are supposed to and not leak out or boil over for a long day? Start hot? Is the fuel system clean and not plugged or full of rust and soon to plug/starve? Are your tires, lug nuts and brakes up to par? Front end shimmy? Lights? Battery? Are there cotter pins in all the places they are supposed to be? Tool kit, spares etc etc. Would you not hesitate to jump in it and drive 50 miles away from home? If you have never toured but want to start, start with a test loop route close to home and just keep making loops. That loop may be as short as around the block but as you shake out issues, you will expand that loop, but never be that far from home. Get it hot and make it work. I think I got 5 houses down the street with my car on my first trek. The guy I bought my car from drained the fuel tank and I never bothered to look once I got it home and off the trailer. I've seen cars roll off a trailer that have never been any further than around the block at home and full of 5 year old gas head out on a tour. They did not do well on the tour and the Tourist did not have as much fun as they could have. But we find them a rear seat so they find out just how much fun touring is and they go home inspired and do their prep work for next time. Pretty soon they are driving their Buick and smiling from ear to ear as they take all their friends for long rides. But then, if you know what you are doing, are a good mechanic, you can buy a car on the way to the Meet and then tour with it like Mark Shaw did in 2006 at Rochester, MN. He also worked on it for 3 days straight on the show field including mounting 5 tires and tubes and a new exhaust heat tube and a long list of other items to get it ready and he and the 1924 Buick did well. Remember, the folks smart enough to help you with an issue on a Tour, and they will, are also smart enough to know if you did your prep work before you left home.
    1 point
  43. Great story, and beautiful car! Thanks for sharing. Evidence clearly points to it being a Curtice car. That makes it a one-of-a-kind treasure!
    1 point
  44. no small wonder convertibles are in such high regards! Beautiful Buick!
    1 point
  45. Its a 1951 Fageol F32F Twin Coach Convertible bus built for evacuation from nuclear attacks (convertible into an ambulance). Bus was built by Twin Coach Company of Kent, Ohio. Engine was a 172 HP horizontal in-line six cylinder Fageol FTC 210-21 mounted on the right side amidships under the floor. Bus wheelbase is 222 inches. It has rear "barn" doors that swing wide open.
    1 point
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