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Showing content with the highest reputation on 11/05/2016 in all areas

  1. Collecting cars is only a by-product to my real passion, restoring cars. I drive a different car many times a year to keep them exercised and the looks that I receive are reward enough for my collecting them. I can't wait for a nice clear day in the winter with dry roads in order to drive my topless old Corvette. The looks are priceless! Some will say that driving them lowers their value, but I know that it increases the value of my life!
    7 points
  2. Ken Lisk beat some tough competition, and his '71 Buick GSX prevails! https://www.hemmings.com/subscribe/current-issue?publication=MUS&source=magazine1
    3 points
  3. Late fall in these parts.
    2 points
  4. Well, cleaned up and installed spare pump 2. Spare pump 1 was very quiet for the few seconds I ran it. But I think it has a seal leak and am not sure the pressure relief valve was working. It would only take a few moments running when the fluid would foam up and it chattered like crazy. It wasn't air in the steering box cause I followed the bleeding procedure sans opening the bleeder screw on the steering box side cover. My side cover has the boss for the bleeder screw, but it appears it was never machined and installed. To be fair, I believe spare pump 1 was the o
    2 points
  5. I live in PA. I own a 1/2 mile long section of woods with a creek and a road running through it. Once a year my wife and I take the front end loader and a bunch of contractor grade garbage bags and do a clean up. Last time we got 800 pounds of cans, bottles, tires, rotten meat (in the creek), old clothes, paint cans and a TV set. I'd love to talk to the EPA far more than they would like to talk to me. I assume this answers your questions....................Bob
    2 points
  6. What color is your Cascada? Just curious as that might possibly influence how long a wax lasts. For a "first time", I would probably use the "red bottle" Meguiars cleaner wax, number "A1216". That should take care of any accumulated "things" which might have been acquired since the car left the assembly plant. For the wash? Meguiars Deep Crystal Car Wash "G10464", with a 5 gallon plastic bucket and a CLEAN wash mitt. For towels? I've used the newer microfiber towels, which many like and use, but I still like the used deep pile bath towels for wiping the wax on and
    2 points
  7. Amen Bhigdog. While I was working at a GM dealer in the 60's I watched the trimmers install many headliners. Sure looked easy. I have done two, one a 53 special and one a 30 Pontiac. Quite different. I might consider doing a Fisher wood bodied one again but never a turret top. I would change a torque tube seal, overhaul a Buick differential or change a clutch in a Buick but never another headliner.
    2 points
  8. It isn't that there's nobody to buy your cars, it's that there's nobody to buy your cars at prices that you think they should command. Please don't take that the wrong way, but some cars are getting less valuable rather quickly. In fact, I bet almost all of our old cars are currently depreciating, some faster than others. Got a 1920s sedan? Falling like a rock. Obscure orphan brands? Likewise. But even blue chip cars are floundering in a measurable way: '57 Chevys, '34 Fords, Model As, and other formerly reliably marketable cars are finding fewer and fewer eager buyers. What does i
    2 points
  9. Last weekend we took the two big ones, the '56 Roadmaster and the '69 Electra out to storage. A nice Fall day, and a sad one to be putting them away for another year! I finally got the new, rebuilt master cylinder installed on the '41 Roadmaster, which is staying in the home garage again this year. So I took it out for a cruise on this great Fall day. Unbelievable weather for Nov 2! Keith
    2 points
  10. New to the forum and new to classic car ownership (for the most part - I used to have a 1948 Plymouth when I was in college, but sold it after about 2 years). I recently decided that I needed to retire my 2003 Nissan daily driver and my wife suggested we consider a classic. I began monitoring local cars for sale, looking for just the right one. I finally found it in this 1953 Buick Special Riviera hardtop restomod. After some long deliberations, I took the plunge. Not that I dislike the stock look of these cars, but the way this car has had its lines cleaned up and streamlined just makes
    1 point
  11. Good logic John cheers pilgrim
    1 point
  12. If you think that your paint may be contaminated first use a clay bar on it. I use the clay bar with Meguiar's Quick Detailer. Unbelievable how smooth the paint becomes before you even begin to apply the wax.
    1 point
  13. Available either way. It's what I use on my daily driver (liquid) but I do use Pinnacle on my 1975 Skyhawk and 2006 Pontiac GTO. The real show cars (GSX's, GNX, Grand National's) I use only a spray detailer by either JaxWax or Meguair's. They are never in the rain or even wet washed. Regarding the claying, I would defiantly do this, especially on a daily driver. It is the best way to remove surface contaminates from the paint surface. I would also wash the car with Dawn dishwashing liquid, but ONLY if you are getting ready to do your clay/polish/wax/detail job. NEVER USE DAWN ANY OTHER
    1 point
  14. The thing that happens with price is that you will see an over the top fresh restoration sell that probably cost 2x what the car is worth and it sets an unreasonable price point. That is the number the next guy with a 30 year old restoration has in his head when he goes to sell. Somebody said earlier that everybody thinks the condition of their car is what it actually was 20 years earlier. I think this is true. But the underlying fact (although I have no statistics to prove this) is that the pool of people that are both capable (either money or mechanical skills) and willing to
    1 point
  15. Ahhh this question is like asking who makes the best Pizza but you asked so here is my 2 cents. I have tried many waxes over the years and thought I was pretty good at detailing paint.....that is until I bought a black car and learned my methods left a lot to be desired. I struggled and struggled to get the result I desired. At the suggestion of others I tried Zaino products https://www.zainostore.com/ and followed their instructions exactly and after that I had never received so many compliments on the paint job. It is true the lighter the color the more forgiving it is when
    1 point
  16. Agree this issue is outstanding beginning to end. It exemplifies the class of cars we drive and in my opinion an excellent decision by the BOD to appropriate the expenditures needed to make it happen. The investment benefits every member. Thank you to all who made it happen.
    1 point
  17. NO exterior sheet metal on the narrower Series 40 1953 Buick.....front gravel pans, front fenders, hood, doors, trunk lid, rear quarter panels, and rear gravel pan..... is interchangeable with the wider 1953 Buick 50-70 Series. The Series 40 grille has fewer teeth that equates to the Special being approximately 4" narrower overall. You were correct in saying that the existing 12-volt system was an upgrade from the OEM 6-volt set up. Just my observations and opinions: (1) The hood fit shown in the picture is not how it left the factory. The picture indicates that the hood is l
    1 point
  18. I'd try a new quality belt.
    1 point
  19. I always considered the Mystery Machine to be a Chevy van. The Scooby-Doo show came out in 1969 and I think the artist was sure to make the van design nondescript. You'll see however current day recreations of the Mystery Machine made from each of the makes - Ford, Chevy, Dodge and WV.
    1 point
  20. I live on not a main road, but a busy secondary road. Same clean up ritual each spring from the slobs.
    1 point
  21. I may have one in my 55 century. I'll look tomorrow and get a picture or two if it's there.
    1 point
  22. How about a photo and a location??? Hard for anyone to consider anything if they don't know whether the car is three or three thousand miles away! A nice, low miles '63 LeSabre is well worth $1000 in my opinion, if you don't have to spend $1500 hauling it across the country. Pete Phillips, BCA #7338
    1 point
  23. the tucker display is awesome! We're so glad that it's a permanent exhibit
    1 point
  24. Just a lot of hard work......
    1 point
  25. Everyone should install a headliner at least once in their lives. It will make you appreciate every thing else in your life...............Bob
    1 point
  26. There isn't any wobble in the pump shaft of the old pump. And the eyeball test shows the pulley straight and in alignment with the other pulleys. What I did notice was that the original pump seems to pump erratically. I wanted to flush the steering box and lines before putting another pump on, so, I disconnected the return line and drained the reservoir as much as possible. Then I spun the pump by hand to push more fluid through the steering box. When I spun it by hand the fluid just dripped out the return line, till one point where the pump caught a prime and then it really pushed the flu
    1 point
  27. A How To: on installing a lift in a low ceiling garage - http://www.chrysler300club.com/tech/lift/rj.html
    1 point
  28. The windlace on my 55 is just below the headliner, so I think it could be done at a later date by just removing the reveal. Yea $1200 is too much. I was quoted $500 installation(plus headliner) at Automat, That's NYC metro area pricing.
    1 point
  29. David, forget everything I said, I just read an article stating the yellow Packards are the ones that will depreciate the quickest. I will swap you my new car for that car before you lose your shirt on it - just call me...
    1 point
  30. And the nurse is probably saying "what the heck are Imperials, Packards, Eldorados and Ghias".
    1 point
  31. As to the younger generations "disposable income", from what I've seen, a lot of young'uns make good money, but the problem is they want EVERYTHING now and not wait. They (married couple or such) want that big house with two sinks in the master bathroom and stainless appliances and granite countertops, and that nice new car to drive....so they're in over their heads from day one, so now BOTH have to work jobs and long hours. When I started out, I bought a small house and fixed it up. Later, sold it and moved to a bigger house, and so on, building as we went, not starting out with
    1 point
  32. Never tried this myself and not sure if it will work for epoxy or other automotive products but I've always wondered how good it works. I put mine on craigslist under "FREE" and it's usually gone in the first 1/2 hour each time. http://www.homedepot.com/p/Homax-3-5-oz-Waste-Away-Paint-Hardener-for-Paint-Disposal-2134/100149311
    1 point
  33. I know a man who at 97 who still goes to work regularly, though not full-time. He still has an office and a secretary, and the company bears his family name. He has a car which he got new in late 1935 and has owned for 80 years! If he had retired early, sat around the beach and puttered around spending time on accomplishing little, I believe he wouldn't have stayed as alert and healthy.
    1 point
  34. I just couldn't pull the trigger so we got a neighbor to take Old Paint to the glue factory. I don't think the Old Grey Mare has long either.
    1 point
  35. Went a little farther with the stiffeners on my 1939 convert, turnbuckles. Fabricated them myself with thread rod, nuts, scrap iron and some black iron pipe. One end is made from left hand thread rod. Didn't weld them to the structure but made simple mounting brackets and bolted everything in. Thought they might come in handy when it came time to fit up the doors. Leveled the frame on the floor and installed them prior to removing body mounts. Had some motivation, there is 1939 convert not far from me that was cobbled so bad that the owner has stopped work on it, unrepairable in
    1 point
  36. Antique cars are a great hobby, keeping people mentally and physically active. So our older members, staying involved, are much less likely to need a rest home!
    1 point
  37. Some brands of seals (in many locations on the vehicle) have seals with the seal section moved slightly away from the contact point on the shaft being sealed. It still installs as normal, just the actual seal section is moved just far enough inboard (usually) to put it on untouched metal. NOT sure if that's available for your particular application, though, or which brands might do that. What you might do is to get the affected area "dressed" such that no edges exist which might damage the new seal. Then see how tightly a new seal fits it. If it still looks "tight", you might s
    1 point
  38. Mighty fine job Pete, Cindy and all who contributed it. Turned immediately to page 71. What a rascally lookin group that is. Great write-up too JD!!! Now to kick back with a bowl of ice cream, watch the World Series and peruse the rest of this great magazine. Life can't get much better.
    1 point
  39. Propane torch until it is soft, remove bulk with putty knife, follow with mineral spirits. Nasty hard work, not so bad if you do one square foot daily .
    1 point
  40. Quote Aaron "The other carb has a 1 1/16" venturi; that one is (I believe) a 725s, so they are NOT the same casting numbers. From everything I've been able to find, however, all WCDs should have the same accelerator pumps, but it sounds like it's not that simple! " End quote. Aaron - Carter type WCD carbs were used on engines from 195 CID to 427 CID. The larger engines require a larger pump shot. Carter accomplished different pump shots by: (a) different diameter pumps, and (b) different length pumps. Changing either changes the volume of fuel in the pump well to be di
    1 point
  41. I think cleaning it, to get back to the original finish. Is a good thing. If you pull a original car from a barn, you would clean and detail it. To show it's original finish in the best light. There is a difference between original condition and dirty.
    1 point
  42. John, I was hoping you found some better than those I tried. Drive it and adjust often. Pull drums and check wear pattern...if not at least 3/4 contact, get a brake caliper to check you drums. If the shoes perform better when hot (mine stopped like a beast when very hot and driven hard), but still hard to stop when cold, you have the same Raybestos junk (or equivalent). If you get some specified linings installed, it is best to have the drums turned and the shoes arced to fit. I never had this much trouble many years ago where I installed some cheapest Western Auto shoes on sc
    1 point
  43. I so appreciate that John! Finished up dinner with friends tonight and we were talking about how it would be nice to go for ice cream in the Buick again. Yes that is the new goal, get on the road and enjoy her.
    1 point
  44. I've always been told that over the counter shoes aren't that great but I wouldn't know the difference. I also use the shoes from NAPA without issue.
    1 point
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