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Showing content with the highest reputation on 08/29/2016 in all areas

  1. I feel your pain. I was so upset I made this video. Now I can Laugh about it.
    5 points
  2. Buy this: http://m.sears.com/craftsman-9-16-x-5-8-in-wrench-12-pt/p-00947463000P?sid=IDx01192011x000001&gclid=CjwKEAjwuo--BRDDws3x65LL7h8SJABEDuFRk2fKyIBigelcpcd9UR8yNcIQAH9rJbT3oqsbsqB0vxoC-lzw_wcB&gclsrc=aw.ds
    3 points
  3. I'm surprised the stuff from Centerville didn't fit, they're supposed to be the number one for hot rod Buicks. But then again, I've been ripped off plenty by the big "number ones"... Mandrel bent dual exhaust that required a month wait with a $500 deposit only to drop it off and on the third day I get a call they just ordered materials after reserving a month out, went somewhere else after they told me my car wasnt worth anything (body is missing half the paint)... Had my pump and steering gear rebuilt by Lares, bearing assembled incorrectly on the pump shaft and ate t
    3 points
  4. I've got the correct bumper jack for my Buick but it is there for show. I would never use it to change a flat. I've been looking about trying to find something practical to keep in the trunk for road trips and here's what I've settled on. It's a scissors jack from a 88-99 Chevy Silverado or GMC Sierra. The jack weighs 10 pounds, 12 ounces. It is 21 inches long and collapses to a 4 inch high profile. Very easy to get under any flat on a car that hasn't been seriously lowered. The lift saddle will fit at standard frame lift points or under the rear axle. The extensions are eac
    2 points
  5. Sorry Chief, ventiports do not a Buick make. Good try though
    2 points
  6. I agree -- I saved the same jack from my completely used-up '89 C1500. Being an OEM truck jack it is very sturdy, smooth action and these should be easy to source at nearly any auto recycler.
    2 points
  7. Does your car run? Does it run properly so that you can drive it at least around the neighborhood? Or it is like some, stationary for a few years, or 20 years, that will take at least a little work to be safely driveable? That will definitely have an effect on its value. And is it a 4-door sedan? A car's body style affects its value too. Convertibles tend to be worth more, 2-door closed cars next in price, and 4-door closed cars the most modestly valued. But every car has a place in history! You can read about the hist
    2 points
  8. Mike, welcome to the AACA discussion forum! You'll find plenty of people here, most experts in some form or another, who will give varying thoughts on your car. You must like old cars, or you wouldn't have bought your Frazer. Good! They are an enjoyable hobby, and you and your family and friends can make many fond memories with them. You say you're thinking of some restoration. There are many different levels of restoration. Most people do not do a total, off-the-frame restoration, because most collectors have relatively modest mean
    2 points
  9. The Manitoba Classic and Antique Auto Club had their annual corn roast today. The host for over 30 years passed away earlier this summer, so there was a bit of a presentation to the family and I think that had something to do with a really good turnout. Aside from the Wildcat and pace car (the latter came late), there was a '41 Limited and '57 Roadmaster for the Buick representation. The weather was very nice and the company was pleasant.
    2 points
  10. that's why i do all my own oil changes, brake jobs and so on and have for many years will for many more as long as I can!!
    2 points
  11. My car hobby prediction for 2017 is : I predict that in 2017 Some clueless fool will ask me when I plan on putting a Chevrolet 350 engine and GM350 automatic transmission in my 1937 Ford.
    2 points
  12. That's actually to be expected with most any repro part. Some vendors are better than others. Fusick's repro parts are usually spot on. The other Buick guys from NJ are just the opposite. I think their motto is "F'em, close enough"...................Bob
    2 points
  13. Just found this picture on Facebook. A gentleman named Robert Tollenaere sold me the car. He took this picture the day he towed the car to my house and sold it to me. He mentioned in the post that he finally sold his 55 Buick Century and that he felt it was going to a good home. True indeed Mr. Rob!
    2 points
  14. Willie turned me on to Bob Drake Ford Reproductions for the material. I'll do a tech tip in TTII (Bugle too if Pete wants it) shortly I took photos as I went, but the credit for the how to goes to Mike (Buick5563) and a thread here from a couple 4-5 years ago.
    2 points
  15. 2 points
  16. There are 2 ways to go: Fix whatever is wrong with the 6V system. Simple, done. Try to convert it to a 12V or mixed 6V 12V system at a cost in time and money of 10X the above. If you are lucky and smart, end up with something that works half assed. When the bad 6V part that caused the trouble in the first place, burns out on 12V fix it. Now you are where you would have been if you fixed it right in the first place, but with a messed up car @ 10X the work and expense.
    2 points
  17. Or drop by my house and borrow one of mine. That starter is HEAVY. Be careful. Ben
    1 point
  18. Mike, considering that a near-perfect car can be had for $16,500 or less, the $4000 price-guide value of your car (once it's running well) may be accurate. Minor work won't bring your car's value to $10,000--but don't be dismayed! Fixing up a car is enjoyable and truly satisfying. However, it's not a money-making proposition, unless you do most of the work yourself and don't count all the time you've put into it. "Reality" TV shows give a completely inaccurate view of the work to restore a car. And please don't think anyone can take short-cuts
    1 point
  19. Well, they were road testing a F*rd...
    1 point
  20. Darkfader, Post your questions and pics on the Frazer Forum in kfclub.com That is the website for the KAISER FRAZER OWNERS CLUB INTERNATIONAL You do not need to be a member of the Club to post, but will need to register for the Forum. Most that visit the site are very knowledgeable about most issues.
    1 point
  21. Update.....Engine not seized, turned easily by hand. So first hurdle overcome. Attached are some interior photos. Thank yo again to everyone offering advice and guidance. Please keep it coming!!
    1 point
  22. I carry a similar scissor jack in my 38 Special. I also carry one in my car trailer. It fits nicely between the tandem wheels to lift both wheels for checking brakes, bearings, & tire changes. It is also a good idea to make sure the "lug wrench" for the tow vehicle can be used on the trailer. Although most of us carry a set of sockets, a good "lug wrench" provides more leverage on wheel nuts.
    1 point
  23. I believe that represents how many were built.
    1 point
  24. I hate left-hand lug nuts because they have occasionally proven to be smarter than I am, embarrassing me in front of friends. The answer to the unasked question is: No, I don't hate people who are smarter than I am (most of the human race), just lug nuts. Just to be fair, I also hate hidden fasteners on interior trim and panels. End of rant, Grog
    1 point
  25. I bet it is 'Flax'; K-F's term for their shade of cream. Craig
    1 point
  26. So what did you buy it for?? At $4000 it may struggle to find a willing buyer as it now A 4 door un poplar brand of car with a very limited market. Very easy to spend 2 or 3 times more than the car could sell for. Who wants a flat head 6 now days? Now if was a 2 door Ford or Chevy on the same age the price as is and price after some work would be different
    1 point
  27. I hope you have a this car : I know some stuff on the kaisers - we had over 87 of them.. I worked on a 1954 and 1949,, Kaiser..I am Not a good resource on the Frazer .. I have Mopars and Chev's..
    1 point
  28. I think I have some stuff for that car.. Not sure if it is 47-48 Frazer.. free if you them pick up.. Not a hot item.. Just left overs.. Link for price: http://car-from-uk.com/sale.php?id=29729
    1 point
  29. Another problem with hydraulic surge brakes is backing up. The trailer ball pushes on the trailer master cylinder and the trailer wheels lock up. One boat trailer my son had for his boat had an electrical connection on the trailer master cylinder that you put 12 volts on and it prevented wheel lockup. Probably had some kind of electrically operated valve that re-routed brake fluid. Turns out there is a 5 wire plug from tow vehicle to trailer instead of the common 4 wire plug. The fifth wire connects to the backup light circuit thereby providing the 12 volts when backing up. Joe
    1 point
  30. I was there on Saturday with the Bug Tussle Trek, did I just miss him? P.S. '39 did fine on the tour, 298 miles with no hitches.
    1 point
  31. In the third photo, I think the hex nut is separate to the castellated nut, which is part of the threaded part. The hex nut is the lash adjustment control and screws into the castellated part. It looks like a variation on the Salisbury axle. Instead of a roller bearing to control thrust it has the thrust ball bearing. The wide bearing is a double row ball bearing? Clean it all up thoroughly and it might become clear. I looked in Dyke's.
    1 point
  32. Beautiful! I love the seamist green, but it looks way better red. A GS grille would be pretty.
    1 point
  33. Finally got the trans out! There were 4 more bolts on the support beam, and 5 on the bellhousing that I hadn't gotten to. The cross beam at the back of the engine doesn't seem to have a whole lot of weight on it - I was able to adjust the back of the engine downwards to get a little more access to the bolts at the top of the bellhousing. Fortunately someone had already cut a hole in the floor to access those bolts previously. With the jack all the way down, the top of the bellhousing was still 4" or so higher than the frame. So I tilted the jack forwards until the transmission sat down on its
    1 point
  34. Wish he was on here more. He is active on the Buick Fireball Eights FB page though
    1 point
  35. All buffed and waxed, finally. First cruise night tomorrow...
    1 point
  36. well I guess since it has the word Harley in it it can stay Thanks for sharing Terry and be sure and remind us on the day of
    1 point
  37. Prompted by the sign in the first post, I did some important research. http://www.angelfire.com/rant/punkmoore/Blatz/history.html based on the historical buildings involved, this would make for an interesting tour next July. Since Leinenkugel comes into play, it makes it a more interesting tour.
    1 point
  38. This subject comes up ALL the time. Everyone has this great idea the first time their 6-volt car struggles to start. Stupid 6-volt electrical system, so unreliable! I need 12 volts! The truth is, 12 volts are completely and totally unnecessary. One, you probably have dirty grounds. Two, it's possible that your battery and starter cables are under-sized. And three, your starter brushes may be worn (not terribly likely, but possible). All these issues easier to fix than rigging up some halfbreed electrical system, and I bet they improve starting performance by a considerable margin.
    1 point
  39. 1 point
  40. On the flathead six Chrysler products I think the shield has 2 functions. One is to reflect exhaust manifold heat away from the fuel pump, the other is to scoop air from the fan over the fuel pump for extra cooling.
    1 point
  41. The heat shield only reduces radiant heat transfer, obviously it does not reduce convective heat transfer. I found that on my cars with vacuum tanks close to the exhaust manifold, heat shields significantly reduces the risk of vapor lock by keeping the vacuum tank a little cooler. Its like standing in the shade on a hot day compared to standing in the sun. The shade blocks the radiant heat from the sun but not the heat from the air temperature..
    1 point
  42. Not such a good "before" photo on this one, but I didn't even know the DYNA FLOW lettering was on the part. Soak for a couple days in the Drano solution to loosen up the grease, water rinse & wire brush to remove the grease, then a couple hours in the Evap-o-rust to get the light surface rust off, and a little more clean up with a piece of Scotchbrite to get the last of the dirt/grease residue off. Final clean w/ alcohol, then paint.
    1 point
  43. Found a before pic of those clamps. Evap-o-rust did good.
    1 point
  44. I was using the Drano as a grease remover. Not rust. Drano is caustic, so very high PH - causes grease to break down, same as what they advertise it would do in a clogged pipe. Vinegar is acid, so very low PH. I'm not sure what vinegar's reaction is - I tried it on a couple of parts a while back and it would immediately re-rust. I know another thread on here said to soak in a baking soda solution to neutralize the vinegar, but all that seems like it's fighting to use something that isn't all that great of a rust remover. How long to soak it for? How to determine correct concentration for the s
    1 point
  45. Got a bigger container for the Drano soak - 5 gallon. Soaked the trans front cover & diff cover. Also did the trans dipstick tube & tube support bracket. The Drano soak releases this rust-orange "mud" out from within the surface of the metal. Hopefully that's soaked-in grease. Anyway, these are the parts after soak, rinse, wash with dish detergent (to remove the Drano "slime" feel & smell), light sand with 220, then wipe with alcohol before prime & paint. On the diff cover, I also hammered out a couple of dents.
    1 point
  46. Having done this (too many times), I feel your pain: back, neck, knees...
    1 point
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