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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/16/2016 in all areas

  1. Got done getting everything installed late last night. Figured that if any problems came up, the car was going to be grounded for the summer, so might as well fill it with antifreeze, put everything on and act like it will work. After double checking and triple checking the pre-start list, and cranking it with the coil wire off to make sure it spun evenly and there were no knocking sounds, and one last "thats everything, right?" call to Old Tank and JD1956 - there was nothing more to do but grab a fire extinguisher, hit the electric pump to prime it, set it on the fast idle cam, kick the tires, light the fires, and.... Nothing. Whoops - coil wire. Take 2 - hardly a full rotation on the starter and it roared to life. And man what a racket. Having replaced the lifters once and expecting some clacking, I was not prepared at all for the racket and whirring and what sounded like gear noises that engine made. I shut it down after 15 seconds it was so obnoxious, and fired it again. No better. 30 seconds later, turned it off again. Walked around, checked for leaks,checked the oil, topped off the radiator, tried to make sense out of all the fumes coming out of it, which was probably just the paint, hit the switch again and it cranked slow and uneven and then started back up. Figured if it was gonna blow it was gonna blow. This time just let it run, kept walking around, checking gauges, looking underneath, watching the exhaust for smoke or steam, topping off the radiator. It was over 5 minutes until things quieted down, and at the end of 30 minutes at about 1800 RPM it idled quietly down to about 600 RPM. The hard cranking was explained by the timing being too far advanced - probably 10-15 degrees judging by the timing light. Got it back to about 7 deg, reset the mixture, checked the dwell which was at 29 deg, and vaccuum fairly steady at 16 inches. Have 25 miles on it so far, and its getting smoother. Only observation is it is running a little hotter than prior to the rebuild but still within a "normal" range. Oil pressure is a little lower than prior also, but I used to run 15-40 Rotella with a bottle of STP in it and this is 10-30 Castrol with only ZZDP in it which does nothing for viscosity. JD noted there was 45 psi on the gauge run by the drill so let it run. Only leak so far is a minor exhaust leak under heavy load on the passenger manifold - dry at the front and rear bearings. Will post a video shortly. Tomorrow it gets inspected then will try to get about 1000 miles on it before taking it on the trip. If its still a clean bill of health, its off to Allentown. I wanted to say thank you to all who helped share their experience, encouragement, answered phones and texts and shared "lessons learned" and war stories from their school of hard knocks. Will try to get all my notes organized for future reference and keep updated on any observations during break in.
    3 points
  2. A handful of folks have been wanting to see more pics of the recently completed project. About 900 hours in my labor plus 180 or so hours at the body shop. One popular question I have received is people do not think the shadow turquoise is a factory 66 Riv color because the color was uncommon. The Sherwin Williams Automotive factory paint rep worked for about 2-3 hours mixing and doing test sprays to get a perfect match to original color chips. Of course the gloss and quality is higher than factory paint which I knowingly pursued and accepted as an over restored condition. The car was originally Riviera gold which was a lighter shade. Much thought went into color selection. Don't be mislead by the original CA black plates as that's just for show but were original and belonged to this car from day 1. The car is registered in PA. For those who aren't familiar with the car or project, this is 1 of 179 factory dual quad 66 Rivieras built in 1966. Engine code MZ. I have much documentation on numbers and date codes for many components I did not even know had date codes. This car amazingly had all of its original wear items like alternator, starter, master cyl, 4 headlamps, voltage regulator, 1 complete side of exhaust system front to back, and on. Most of it is seemingly useless info but figured better to document during the resto because its very difficult after its done should there ever be interest. The wood steering wheel was the only option I added. The car originally had door guards but I have not had the nerve yet to install them because once they go on, they don't come off without taking paint with it. Open for opinions on if they should go on or not? As you can see the car was a mess when I got it even though there is convincing evidence it had low miles. Very poorly stored outdoors for 30 years. While the body was pretty solid it had some damage and repair + major RR quarter damage which probably kept most people from buying it until I came along as a gluten for punishment or sucker as some might say. LOL
    2 points
  3. Well, I finally got it running tonight, but only for a short time, as it was pushing 10:00 PM, and my neighbors who live right next to my garage are early to bed folks. What a train wreck of problems I've had this week. The power steering pump reservoir starting leaking the when I put it back into position, so that was another few days to get a rebuilt one. The motor mounts were a total nightmare to get lined back up, but I finally did. Etc., etc. It started quickly, but didn't sound good, then a timing adjustment, and the A/C compressor which I thought was locked down slipped and sparks flew as it hit the alternator fan. AHHHHH! With that now alright, I restarted and it ran quite well, nice and smooth with a bit of valve noise, but it hasn't been run in while, and the cam needs to break in, so normal I think. This was all of 2 minutes of run time, due to considerations for aforementioned neighbors, so I've no idea yet if there are oil leaks, etc. The oil pressure light went out right away, which is good, but I have a gauge that I want to put on it, to see what it is pumping to, to make sure all is well there. So a few more things to do up, that I didn't do tonight, then let it down and hopefully a test drive tomorrow. Then if all is well, I'll get Jeff annoyed with me and change my registered car to it, from the '56. Maybe I'm getting ahead of myself, but we are still hoping to travel in the Electra. Keith
    2 points
  4. Leaving from Lorain , Oh going to meet up with he group traveling cross country from Washington,going to try to catch them at Falling Water PA Tuesday morning then on to Allentown,
    2 points
  5. I saw these on the KKOA website and wondered if you'd seen them. FOR SALE:(423): Custom made Aluminum inserts for 1953-1954 Buick headlights. ( New) 1 pair. Located in Kansas. $ 110.00 set. Ralf 785-304-1464
    1 point
  6. Here is a photo for members to enjoy. My mother and father standing in front of their 1951 Cadillac that was built in Biel, Switzerland. The car has no hood ornament, projecting ornaments are against the law in Holland. Also has amber turning signals, Marchal electronics, 30 gallon gas tank kilometer speedometer, patent plate was in French. The car initially belonged to the Belgian ambassador to the Netherlands, which is why it had flag holders mounted behind the front bumper in case it was to be used for parade purposes. My parents and I traveled all over Europe in "Matt". Yes, I wish I had it now! Dave
    1 point
  7. Yes, I really need to proofread when typing on my phone. 22g it is. ? Unless it is an SS, and then, "perhaps" 36k. ? But again, back to Wings515 original question... Have your friend look at his registration... Actually, at local shows I've seen "Elkys" with trucks, Chevelles, muscle cars in general, etc. Let us know more info.
    1 point
  8. I think we both have a typo in our last posts. It should be 22g. I was looking at the wrong line when I quickly glanced at it before my last post, and I think you meant 22 instead of 23 in your last post.
    1 point
  9. Hello Beemon, Thanks for your information. But I did it like E Muscle. LLC. Today I made my first test drive with my new brake system. I put this unit into my 56 trunk. http://www.ebay.de/itm/171831259342?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT . 67-72 Chevy Truck 11" Power booster with master and valve. As donater cylinder I used a .75" master cylinder http://www.ebay.de/itm/230910285120?_trksid=p2057872.m2749.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT And as slave cylinder I bought a VW T4 Clutch cylinder http://www.ebay.de/itm/KUPPLUNGSNEHMERZYLINDER-NEHMER-ZYLINDER-fur-KUPPLUNG-NEHMERZYLINDER-VW-/380746597697?hash=item58a6440541 After I had everything in my trunk, I connected the unit with the brake lines. As vacuum line I uses 3/8" line out of a mixture of Copper, Ni and Ferum. First test drive was very good. Afer a short brake in time, the brake power was better as with the stock set up. May be an Chevy Astro Master cylinder for my Astro AWD front calipers will be a better choice. May be I will check this opportunity in winter, because I have a new Astro MC in stock. But now the Buick is driveable again and back on the road after this hassle. Thomas
    1 point
  10. Panel board or cowl board. The same stuff (without the holes) is used for the front kick panels. It comes in different colors.If your upholsterer does not have any, you can order it from Restoration Specialites and Supply in Windber, PA. I suspect the holes are to allow the heat to come up from the under-seat heater, which I assume this car has? Otherwise, there wouldn't be any need for the holes. Pete Phillips, BCA #7338 Leonard, TX.
    1 point
  11. The U. S. A. Today "contest" is almost like voting for America's #1 pet: Do you like monkeys, goldfish, squirrels, hamsters, or gerbils? And then leave dogs and cats out of the running! Conclusion: "Oh, goldfish! Goldfish are preferred above all other pets!" Actually, their contest mixes categories--new-car shows, concours events, and antique-car shows. They aren't comparable!
    1 point
  12. Some further clarification. First, do as Padgett suggested and check coolant temp in diagnostics (can't remember which parameter number of the top of my head and see if it displays irrespective of the gauge showing correctly. If so, then both parameters are getting into the cluster but the cluster is not post-processing the data properly for display on the gauges. Note that the diagnostics display on the cluster is handled by a different portion of the circuitry than the gauge "faces" so the former may show fine where the gauges themselves are not working as they are not receiving the needed display data from the shift registers (and again, these are IC's integral to the cluster). As to the gradual drop off of the tach, this is expected as the cluster has a smoothing algorithm in it's firmware to keep the gauge displays from exhibiting jitter or jumping around wildly. This makes the displays more refined, like a sweep needle on an analog gauge. Without it, the gauges (speedo and tach anyway) would be very distracting to look at. So, if it loses the tach altogether, it wind down rather than reading 0 instantly. Further, don't make the assumption that the tach and temp gauges are dependent on each other to display. That isn't the case, it is just that in this instance your cluster has a malfunction that is affecting both concurrently. I do not think you have a UART dataline fault, and if you can pull tach and temp readings via diagnostics even when the gauges are not working, then the UART is fine as the data is being supplied but not properly acted upon by the cluster. Finally, the 98 Regal FSM will not be much help in troubleshooting the Reatta. While the cluster may have similar functionalty, it is a completely different system of communication (GM Class II bus and OBD2 platform) and thus any similarities are purely superficial. Also, unless I'm mistaken, the last gen Regal has an analog cluster based upon stepper motors for its gauges, with digital odomoter and information readouts. Basically nothing notable in common with the Reatta. Anyway, I'm 98% certain the cluster is the issue here. Vibration may or may not affect the issue. More often it is thermal, and as things heat up and expand open circuits occur in either marginal solder connections on the circuit board, or in a failed component like an IC. The 90/91 cluster is heavy on surface mount components and pass through joints (known as vias) on the double sided boards within. These are a known source of problems as well, and account for a lot of the issues with these clusters. I do not, however, suspect this the problem with yours.
    1 point
  13. Some proper facts. Ethanol is not the problem. I found this quote in a document entitled "Ethanol Fuel Properties and Data Page" from txideafarm.com "Older automotive systems are much like conventional aircraft systems, in that fuel from the pump “dead-heads” against the metering device on the engine, waiting to be used. This is a hot environment, and the fuel gets hot while it waits to be used. The critical area is usually the low pressure inlet to the fuel pump. If the fuel begins to boil, the vapor bubbles cause the pump to lose its suction ability, and it ceases to pump fuel. This is vapor lock. Low boiling points, high RVP, and low latent heats of evaporation act to make this problem more severe. All gasolines have severe disadvantages relative to ethanol by any of these measures. In tests, neat ethanol has proven virtually impossible to vapor-lock."
    1 point
  14. A compression test would indicate if you have a blown head gasket? Get the oil and kero out first!
    1 point
  15. Wifey is very excited and helping with interior parts that need to be cut and covered with vinyl. she is doing good!
    1 point
  16. Engine is all back together, full of coolant and ready for another try tomorrow. Had nice compression on #1 cylinder when checking for tdc. wish us luck tomorrow.
    1 point
  17. This is how it is supposed to look when timing gears are aligned correctly.
    1 point
  18. Don and Larry, My "Dash Wire Conduit" is out of my 1925-25, and attached are photos and a drawing. The 1925 Standard parts book calls it part number 167438, The 1924 6 cylinder parts book calls it 44227. In the large Master parts book, these numbers do not exist (section 2.510). This book lists the Dash Wire Conduit as part number 192038 which fits 1924 4 cyl, 1924,1925,1926,1927 6 cyl. So check the dimensions Don, and this should fit. The folded end is the top end. It is very thin sheetmetal and should be easy to fabricate. Hugh
    1 point
  19. Unless it is an electrical fan and it is wired backwards.
    1 point
  20. A busy week since coming back last weekend. Monday morning took the Cougar over to the other place to get my work truck. While turning off the main road doesn't the engine rev some with out moving faster..... Went the three blocks, parked and checked the trans fluid. READING - LOW. Stopped at the mechanics (with the truck) and since he was short handed said it might be next week before he could get it on the hoist to take a look. Meantime, went about the day and after supper my son wants to get his Mustang out for an evening run. He gets in our trusty old 1999 Van to move it out and.... NO MOVEMENT IN FORWARD OR REVERSE WITHOUT SOME CLANKING NOISE! We managed to get it down the driveway out on the road and then there was no moving it at all! After 14 years of hauling kids, pets and groceries very dependably she has served us well. But we knew the time was coming and had been looking for a replacement for awhile but didn't think it would be quite this dramatic.... Had looked at another Van last week, put a deposit on it and waiting for some touch up work on the rear bumper to be completed so made a call to see where things were at. Wednesday we came home with it and Mommy is happy again! This one has only 43,885 kms (28,525 miles) on it for a 2009! No, it was not the car salesman story about the "little old lady driven car", it was indeed owned by a grandfather who passed away, willed it to his granddaughter and she thought it was not her style so traded it in on a Jeep. Thanks sweetheart! Hoping to get another 14 or so years out of this one (with luck).
    1 point
  21. Jason, the main thing to consider regarding the door edge guards is how thin the paint film is on the edge of the doors.... if you have too much paint thickness on the edges the paint will chip out on you when you put them on beyond where the guards will sit and ruin your perfect paint job. I love door edge guards, but on your magnificent paint job resto I don't think you can afford to risk a chip disaster so I would vote leave them off in this case. As I already stated on another post, your car is as good as it gets, bravo and well done! As for driving your car, my advice is to drive it on the boulevards but stay off the highways....stick to 50 mph and slower. This is what I do with my 100 point restos and in 26 years of doing that I haven't hurt the cars enough to keep from winning best of shows every so often. For out of town meets, you must use an enclosed trailer for a car like yours. I know it's scary, but get out and drive the car once in a while, a car you can't drive is no fun in the long run.......trailering everywhere and sitting in lawn chairs next to it gets old after a while! To ease the scariness of that first trip out on the streets......here is a pic of my GTO that I restored back in the late 80's.......I've driven it on boulevards since then for 20,000 miles and I won a best of show PAINT award last July 4th out of 250 cars with it, so you can in fact have your cake and eat it too!
    1 point
  22. Upholsterers also call it "panel board" and most auto upholstery shops have it in stock. 32 X 48 inches I recently paid $20 for a sheet.
    1 point
  23. The problem with Swiss cars is you can't get them out of neutral
    1 point
  24. I'd use the diagnostics to display the coolant temp and see if that also fails. Also there are two AC signals in the diagnostics, one for the ECM and a different one for BCM. Does the BCM stay up and the ECM goes off or do both go off.
    1 point
  25. Max speed was going up a hill with plenty of pedal left.
    1 point
  26. Check ignition timing and check distributor vacuum advance chamber. Retarded timing will cause overheating and a bad advance chamber will cause two problems: retarded spark and a vacuum leak. The vacuum leak will cause a lean mixture and contribute to overheating. These problems are frustrating. Good luck. (o[]o)
    1 point
  27. After reading this thread I am thinking that you never did figure why it overheated in the first place. Or what damage that may have resulted from an overheat. You say that fluid came out of the exhaust, just what fluid? If its coolant you still have a problem. If the fluid is what you put into the cylinders it shouldn't be able to pass thru the exhaust valves and into the exhaust unless the exhaust valves are very worn. I would be inclined to run a leak down test before I tried to run it again. With particular attention to leaks from the combustion chambers to the cooling system. A little trick, with the water pump belt removed and the radiator cap removed look for bubbles in the radiator with the engine running. If you see bubbles it will be exhaust and would indicate a void somewhere between compression and cooling. (head gasket, cracked head etc.)
    1 point
  28. 1 point
  29. You need to leave the spark plugs out, and use the starter to get most of the oils/kero out of the cylinders. I think there is a good chance it could foul the plugs when trying to get it to run. It is normal to be forced to clean and dry the plugs a few times. It does need to be outside. It will smoke the entire neighborhood before all the oils can be heated enough in the muffler to burn out.
    1 point
  30. I'd be a little concerned about "fluid came out the tail pipe", from your description, that means there's transmission fluid and kerosene in the exhaust pipes and muffler. That's a lot of fluid if it came out of the pipes and there's also some in the oil pan. Just be careful. There are tales of certain fuel pumps leaking into an oil pan (Cord 810-812 is an example), and causing a crankcase explosion which basically destroys the engine.
    1 point
  31. Dear Mr. Earl and Friends, We are going to be in Norwalk, Ohio for the Buick, Oldsmobile, Cadillac meet at the Summit Motorsports raceway park next week, July 24th. We have had teething problems with the transmission that required a second removal and tear down by Scott at Steuben Auto. Out Damn sprag! Out!!! Dave Machuga applied some welding mastery last night and removed a disk brake bracket, reground it to pull it in tighter away from its rim-rubbing position on the smaller 15" drag wheels. We were blowing oil smoke out of the starboard side turbo due to excessive clearances in the backing plate. Exclusive Turbo Systems, Sanford, Florida, is handling to rebuild and the P-72 turbonetics ball bearing turbo should be here tomorrow. Aside from an electrical problem, to be fixed this weekend, we are looking good for Norwalk! its been a long road, about a year of preparation. We are not going all that fast but since we are so heavy it takes lots of power to get 2.5 tons into 11seconds and a lot of stress on components. That's one reason why the big Buick Electra record stood for 30 years! Fastest "Boats" http://www.v8buick.com/archive/index.php/t-128608.html God Speed! PS: See the new drag seup. MT 315/60/15 ET Street Drag radials.
    1 point
  32. The best solution for restarting your Riv after an extended period is to use a trickle charger on the battery. A little cranking to fill the float bowl will get oil moving to the bearings and in a collector car the cumulative wear on the starting system is minimal. If your car fails to start after enough cranking to fill the float bowl then there is an issue with the accelerator pump in the carb. Tom Mooney
    1 point
  33. Thanks for the support - been a couple long days and too pooped to post! Summary of where we are at: Couple of setbacks - The engine mounts from CARS did not fit. They are .080 too narrow on the installation studs, and when "modified" so they could fit, instead of the ears pointing at the 12 and 6 oclock positions like factory they pointed inwards at a 1 to 7 oclock position on the driver side, and 11 to 5 oclock position on the passenger side. They were correctly installed left and right - simple could not get them to line up to the engine block brackets. I had to put the old mounts back in - heres factory followed by the ones from CARS: A flywheel to toque converter bolt got stripped out and had to drill that puppy out. And had to carefully remove the old exhaust in case it needed to be reused. Note all the beat marks in the old system to make it fit: The oil pressure was solid: This is always a high risk maneuver - had about an inch clearance from the top of the cherry picker to the garage door: Some 2 inch bolts with the heads cut off served as guide pins and keeps any leverage weight off the hub on the torque converter: The engine would not go the final 1/4 inch no way no how which ironically seemed to be the exact thickness of the heads on the torque converter bolts. Doh! Line up the holes, goofball. A dab of paint on the flywheel at disassembly matched to a corresponding paint dab on the torque converterhelped to line up the holes perfectly. A little Vegemite on the the bolts and the engine and bell housing jumped together with no effort. Back in the saddle: The new exhaust fit perfectly. I left the Y pipes in the car and the engine and manifolds were set in on top. The system was left loose all the way back to allow for some final adjustment. I need to weld a hanger on the frame to hang the front of the muffler to. That and buttoning up the under car work is todays job, then its engine compartment work. Before putting the engine in the distributor shaft and oil pump shaft were aligned and noted where true TDC on #1 cylinder was so that after spinning the engine to get the flywheel bolts on would not loose the true TDC position (prevent the distributor from being 180 degrees out). The distributor prior to removal was marked at the 6 and 12 o clock positions on the distributor housing to align in a straight line with the valley pan bolts, another mark to initially align the rotor prior to dropping in the distributor, and a final rotor alignment mark so that when the distributor is fully inserted and the rotor rotates to follow the helical cam gear it will point to the correct #1 plug in the cap. That should be good enough to start it. If things go well today and tomorrow should have light off..... well, soon.
    1 point
  34. True on that .. I read it twice, and I can't see that it could have liquid locked by the fact that it did restart, but stopped in 15 seconds. Babbit bearings normally could not seize from coolant issues. If a rod started to seize due to lack of any oil, it reaches the melting point instantly and all the babbit drops out of one rod at once. I've never seen an iron piston seize to the bore from coolant loss....but there are lots of things I've never seen. I agree on possible starter bendix jamb. It is worth removing the starter to tell. And then if still stuck, squirt oil into each piston bore and see if a bar on the flywheel gear can get a little movement, going both ways somewhat gently.
    1 point
  35. Check that the starter is not stuck in gear. If not then remove the head and the oil pan. The reason your engine is locked will likely then be obvious. My guess is your head gasket failed causing the initial overheating. When you replaced the antifreeze and ran the engine antifreeze flowed into one or more of the cylinders and created a hydraulic lock. Hopefully more damage did not occur. Is there antifreeze (white froth) visible on your dip stick?
    1 point
  36. davinci, Welcome to the AACA Discussion Forum. Model A Engines can often take a lot of abuse and keep working. As Trimacar has pointed out, there are a lot of potentially bad things that could have happened. If you are very lucky, your extensive attempts to start it simply caused a problem with the starter. I suggest you remove the bolts that hold the starter onto the engine and remove the starter. I have seen times when a Model A Starter Bendix got hung up and locked up a Model A engine. If you are lucky, you will find that the problem is a stuck Starter Bendix. After you have removed the Starter, try to turn the engine by hand and see if it is still stuck. You might be lucky and find that it is free.
    1 point
  37. Well, not quite an "Overhaulin" marathon but a couple long days and late nights. Got everything painted last night, finished tapping out the remainder of the holes in the block. Had to replace the 4 small bolts in the water pump and one in the water manifold. Darn near snapped one. The harmonic balancer bolt was a white knuckle affair going from 85 to 104 ft-lbs - jeese thought it was going to snap but it got there. Noted that the CARS Apple green of 10 years ago is a deeper green than todays. I didn't paint the valve covers - they were in good shape and I just buffed and waxed them. Wrestled with the stupid Harbor Freight touch up gun - worked great on the block and the oil pan but started spitting and put orange peel all over the valley pan. Funny how little simple things cost time and slow progress. If thats the worst that goes wrong this will be a home run. Here are the light weight aluminum racing valve covers that Willie was drooling over. These are extremely sought after, will fit all Buick nailheads and no two valve covers are alike. These are only available in 2016 and when they're gone, they're gone. They come with a jar of Vegemite and an acetylene torch to seal them up as no known manufacturers traditional gaskets will work. The real point of the picture is test fitting the Y pipe from M&J exhaust before hanging the engine over the car, and it fits perfect. Perfect. Did I mention perfect? The old bent up squished down one from an out of business supplier might find a future as a wind chime hanging from the tree that was used to help "make it fit". (since it was supposed to fit a 55 Buick also despite much arguing) Drizzled more assembly lube on all the rocker shafts and under the rocker arms and the cam lobes. Ed whipped up a Nailhead only fixture to prime the engine, I cheaped out and didn't buy an oil pressure gauge, just put a 1/8 in pipe plug in the oil line hole and received two demerits so its off the buy a gauge tomorrow. 2500 RPM Clockwise (you have a 50.50 chance of getting it right) and after about 20 seconds all kinds of spitting and hissing and up from the pan comes the bubblin crude. Do that for about 3-4 minutes and the drill gets freakin hot - there is a bit of a load on it. Got a little nervous as the rear rockers dripped then stopped, but after sliding them a little back and forth on the shafts they started dripping from between the shaft and the rocker arm and from where the pushrod meets the rocker. Apparently nothing comes out the bleed hole in the rocker unless its running. All the cam bearings looked wet, the center oil galley is feeding the cam bearings, and oil is bubbling in the lifter bores around all the lifters, and the garage floor was bone dry. So far so good. Tomorrow is oil pressure, potential compression tests, engine compartment work and pulling the old exhaust system out and installing the new one. The exhaust is another "first time trial" that could trip things up. Better save the old pipes just in case. TIm - two risks retired today - TCPI .92 We should have our heads examined.
    1 point
  38. So, Saturday was a wash for working on the car. Had an incredible time with my son getting him ready for his first solo week at Boy Scout summer camp. Took him to camp and helped the Troop get everything set up. Today, started at 7:00 am. All of the wiring is connected. I now have taillights, headlights, maplight and radio working. Finished wiring in the courtesy lights on the seat. And, installed the drivers door panel. Need to finish attaching to the door No crank yet and I think I know why. Will dive back in tomorrow after work. Good night Matt
    1 point
  39. "on budget, behind schedule" One outa two is not bad ben
    1 point
  40. Thanks for the inputs - sounds like dropping into the car is the way to go. We're pretty confident its together right. Decided to use the adjustable push rods as the lifter preload was .080 which although a little high might have worked out but as long as the pushrods were here, what the heck. Followed the steps outlined in this article: http://www.enginebuildermag.com/2011/06/getting-to-the-bottom-of-hydraulic-lifter-preload/ Went about 1 turn on the rods which corresponded to .030 of preload and we were done (threads were 32TPI) We ended up going with the low compression gaskets that should be .048 compressed thickness. We had less than .100 piston to valve clearance with 2 steel gaskets (.030 total thickness for measurement purposes only), and probably could have went with a .015 steel gasket for final assembly but figured better to be safe than sorry. We had .020 milled off the heads, and Ed was certain there was at least .010 taken off the heads, if not more, some previous time. The .020 we milled off just about compensates for the thicker head gasket (.048 LC gasket thickness - .020 = .028 head gasket thickness vs .015 stock HC head gasket thickness). The engine is unloaded and is on the stand in the garage. Am going to finish bolting the accessories on then run the compression test on the stand and make sure the pieces are working and get it painted. We made up a fixture to fit in the distributor pocket to engage the oil pump and prime the engine. Have the ZZDP also. Time to hustle. On budget and behind schedule
    1 point
  41. I never used a run stand like Mudbone, but did run one on a bare frame with all the drivetrain installed. It is hard to keep them cool with just a box fan. I always fill with oil, turn the oil pump with a drill to show there is good oil pressure and oil at the rockers. Then I install a distributor and starter and turn it over with the plugs out, checking for abnormal rotation, noises and compression on all cylinders. Clean, paint and install. Start if and run without coolant for 10 seconds and add coolant if ok and start again for break in procedure. If there is a serious problem in the first 10 seconds then you don't have coolant to deal with during tear down. Also the heat expansion of the cylinder head will better seal the head gasket. Willie
    1 point
  42. SUCCESS! Much more exact in height to factory, 20 lbs more seat pressure. Factory inner valve spring on right, replacement SBI inner valve spring on left: Compare to the left pair of inner valve springs below, Buick factory spring on left, VS527 Sealed Power spring on right. That height difference will not be a factor if you are running all factory parts or if you only install most "stock" aftermarket cams that run slightly higher lift. If you choose a "stock" cam with inherent higher lift and upgrade the rockers, or put a high lift performance cam in, this need to be paid attention to. The height difference of the VS512 is what causes it to bind at 1.13 inches, vs the factory and SBI spring binding at .980 inches. Translation: the SBI and Buick factory springs can tolerate a high lift cam, the VS512 cannot - only stock. So - with that one behind us, heads are all assembled - tomorrow we should have the assembly of all major components complete and installed on the engine and turn it over again. After that will come checking lifter preload, loading up and hauling the engine back to the house, doing a prelube, and painting. Am trying to decide if its worth making a quick and dirty engine stand or dropping it in the car and go for it. Anyone have a diagram of the basics to hook up a primary and secondary electrical circuit to run the engine out of the car? Assume don't need a generator or regulator, but would need a switch, starter solenoid, battery, what else?
    1 point
  43. You guys are all making me feel better, thank you. The attached has been in my garage (or more accurately three garages due to moves) since 1994, photos circa 2002, 2004, and current. I am doing all my own work and literally no other person has touched the car except the chrome plater and the machine shop. But as we all know life gets in the way, my job is 45-60 hours a week and we moved in 2005 (major home renovation) and 2013 (preparing for sale of property and kitchen remodel in new). Car was in offsite storage from mid 2013 to late 2015 while I waited for a new garage to move it to. I estimate over 2500 hours worked and the interior is still not done, but it is on the road and driving now. A part timer in his garage has to absorb little inefficiencies that take longer than a pro--when I was in a shop working on mostly prewar Classics we estimated a nice round 2000 hours for a restoration, which if you do the math means 1 year at 40 hours a week but that does not allow for delays for waiting on parts or suppliers, so 18-24 months to completion was a better estimate. When I hear the "Fast and Loud" idiot on TV saying he will restore a basket case in 6 weeks I am ready to kill him through the TV set. Thanks again to you guys for making me feel better here in the real world, Todd C
    1 point
  44. Thanks BuickNutty and Matt, It looks like I'm ok. Tag calls for Trim 422. I've been to SMS and have the swatches for the seats, just all of a sudden got worried that seat back should not be split. Thanks for clearing it up for me. Anne
    1 point
  45. RetroFest - cont'd Such a unique design with those suicide doors! I know, I know, this should be about my Buick's (and it will be) but I'm smitten! Have to sell off some before I can even think about it.... In the meantime, good to have friends willing to share! All in all, a nice day!
    1 point
  46. My desktop pictures rotate every few minutes, and this one just came up. I think it kinda epitomizes why Rivieras are so much fun. In my grandpa's '56, there would have been a post where my son's head is. What fun would that have been?
    1 point
  47. That's the answer, maybe judges will UNDERSTAND the issue, and go easy on point reductions for those that go the fab route, SEEMS SMART TO ME. My exhaust is 304, and I truly love the set up. Mandrel bent, beautiful Tig welds, a Indy car exhaust fellow built my system. Dale in Indy
    1 point
  48. A lot of early wreckers or "tow cars" were built on used luxury car chassis. Good luck finding a cheap 1918 Rolls Royce, Pierce Arrow or Packard 12 to put it on .
    1 point
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