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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/05/2016 in all areas

  1. There were two 1949 Roadmaster convertibles used in the movie "Rain Man" as most of you know. The other one was in the Greenwich Concours de Elegance held June 4-6, 2016 in Greenwich Connecticut. I was invited to display my 1953 Special Riviera hardtop in the Saturday showing of US made cars. I located the other 49 Roadmaster Convertible at this meet. It is owned by Wayne Carini of the TV show Chasing Cars. He was the Grand Marshal of the Greenwich Concours. I will try to attach a photo of the 1949 Roadmaster and my 1953 Special. Joe, BCA 33493
    7 points
  2. Couldn't resist finishing the fender and hanging some trim
    4 points
  3. 1953 Buick Roadmaster out for a drive on the 4th of July in rural SW Iowa.
    3 points
  4. I have a '41 Limited limousine as well and have found the brakes in particular are the strongest pre-war brakes I've ever experienced. Even in a massive car like this, they stop well and don't give up easily. Two weeks ago we attended a show with it with two very long downhill grades where trucks were warned to use a lower gear. I babied the Limo down the first hill but it turns out it was totally unnecessary, the brakes were just fine when I just coasted down the second. The Limiteds have brakes that are about 20% larger than the other 1941 Buick models and the drums are cast iron, not steel,
    3 points
  5. My only collector car is a1929 Studebaker President Brougham that I purchased in October 2000. The President had been in storage for over 30 years, in non-running condition, when I acquired the car. I spent the first winter getting it running and road worthy. For the past 16 years, I spend every winter doing something to upgrade the condition of the car making sure that the project is completed in time for the next years driving season. So far, this has worked out for me and I have never been unable to drive it on a spring, summer, or fall meet. This method makes it possible for me to e
    2 points
  6. I disagree that anyone was scolding him. I don't care what he does with his car, but he's got a big project ahead of him, he hasn't even driven the car, and I'm guessing that someone put a bug in his ear that the modifications he describes are mandatory to be able to drive any old car. I think that's a mistake and I think that's largely what's feeding the "resto-mod" trend--guys who know nothing about old cars being told what to do by shops with experience doing it only one way: Chevy crate motor and 12-volt wiring. I also think that if you're starting a project you should set goal
    2 points
  7. Your ignition coils may be OK. The resistance of 10K in the secondary is pretty close to 9K, and the slightly higher resistance may be due to more turns of fine wire in the secondary coil that will produce a higher spark plug voltage. I would suspect the capacitor (condenser), the wire inside the distributor connecting the points to the exterior terminal for the wire going to the coil or some other wiring irregularity. Set the timing at idle by the book and then connect the new vacuum advance and see what develops. Joe
    2 points
  8. TKennedy, the transmission used in the Edsel was not a straight Borg Warner as Willie Wurke says, but a Ford Cruiseomatic which was based on the B/W, which became the C-6 in 66. Should bolt right up and be a perfect fit and quite satisfactory for you. I doubt if you will have very many people pointing at your car and saying "look, his transmission has the wrong part number" ! Good for ya', enjoy it !
    2 points
  9. Making the changes sounds fine, but don't rush into it. Do the routine maintenance on the original systems and try it stock for 30 or 40 years. Then if you don't like it move forward on the modifications. Bernie
    2 points
  10. Cleaned up out back some too.... now I need to devote time to the building.....
    2 points
  11. Bob tells me that his daughter Ashli and husband Adam will be bringing this car to Allentown and hopes everyone will make a point to stop by and say hello.
    1 point
  12. I bought my 1962 Triumph TR4 in March 2008 and finished the restoration on Memorial Day 2015. 7+ years. I did almost everything myself to include the paint and installing the interior kit. Only thing I did not do was the chrome plating.
    1 point
  13. Thanks everyone you make me feel a lot better about my 2 years working only on the wood structure . I showed the post to my wife about the length of time for some of the restorations on the posts and she said " how long ? ? "
    1 point
  14. Here's what mine looks like if it's any help. Looks like previous owner messed with it some...
    1 point
  15. Does look great . Assume it uses tubes and is AM only .
    1 point
  16. Thanks everyone for the opinions and advise. One opinion given me was buy "newer" 15 inch rims so I can put whatever I want on the car. What i have found is newer rims aren't made the same as 42 rims and the look wont be the same. Plus I am having a heck of a time finding 4. Anyway, to make a long story short, I have decided to go Coker Classic black wall bias tires at $136 each + tubes. the savings will allow me to do a few other things. Thanks again for all the thoughts and opinions.
    1 point
  17. 1 point
  18. My first car was a 60 MGA in 1974. Mine needed a complete redo of the body and repair to rusted out sections of the frame. Yours looks to be very solid in comparison. Car was a lot of fun, but was sold to buy something that could be used year round. Replaced it about 10 years later with a TR3.
    1 point
  19. I will 'admit' I didn't make my comments as clear as they should have been. Sorry about such. I should have stated comments like WAIT 30-40 YEARS, and GRAFT THE FRONT CLIP ON A TRUCK were IMO not helpful to the original poster. I'm sure the posters were having fun, but doubt the owner was looking for such answers. To me any NEW poster should be handled with softer words/comments. I have noticed that to many former posters are not around anymore, and that isn't good for the site/us, IMO Now back to working on my MODIFIED Limited, just havin fun.
    1 point
  20. Having worked for a company in Ivyland PA & visited many times, I have tried Scrapple & I can assure everyone that SPAM is much better. I think only the natives in and near PA like to eat that stuff... https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scrapple Whereas, many people worldwide continue to eat SPAM from a can; especially those in Hawaii. We went to the SPAM Museum on our way to the national meet in Rochester MN. It is one of the coolest museums of it's kind. http://www.spam.com/museum
    1 point
  21. Agreed. The voltage input/output is based on the primary/secondary winding ratio, not the resistance of each side. Ohming it out tells you if you've got an open or short winding, but you have to keep technology differences in perspective. Not just in your meter, but in the coil itself. Unless you are testing an original, 60 year old, Delco coil, I'd call those numbers ballpark. An aftermarket coil may have more windings or a different gauge of wire, which would change the resistance, while still maintaining the same winding ratio. They look close close enough to me, I'd focus my efforts e
    1 point
  22. I agree with Matt, but neither of us lives in New Jersey.
    1 point
  23. At the Show Site. Everyone that is registered will get a letter with your Registration-Directions-Show Car and/or On Person decal and a list of events; in the next two weeks. Included, will be your assigned spot on the show field.
    1 point
  24. Being Canada surely more likely to be a Laurentian?
    1 point
  25. Well, WHY would he return, he wasn't given a BIG WELCOME and a HUG. Of course you know how, 'I' feel, The site has a modified section, but MOST really don't give a D -- about helping someone that wants to make changes to his/her car. I sent him a PM, and will be happy to assist him should he decide to modify his Limited. I'm sure he felt most posts were SCOLDING him for the thought of making the changes he is looking for. Dale in Indy
    1 point
  26. I'm sure anything can be done if you throw enough thought and $$ at it. Luckilly the dash already has end vents which could be hooked up to anything. That just leaves a center vent. Since you are not opposed to modifications it would be really neat to go with a vintage air system, and replace the ash trays with another set of the end vents. That would give you 4 outlets and a modern efficient unit to work with.
    1 point
  27. Mailed mine in late last week; a suggestion to give you peace-of-mind would be to include a self-addressed stamped envelope that allows for confirmation of your entry to be returned to you safe in hand, well ahead of time. Though I've never had a problem picking up my packet at Fall Hershey, I am mindful of the 1200 to 1500 vehicles entered, and the tremendous undertaking that is involved in making sure every single entry is accounted for. I always take the returned SASE, including the confirmation, with me to the registration tent, just in case--better to have something and not
    1 point
  28. Well, it took longer than I had hoped to get to this, but I finally made the resistance measurements on the sending unit in my '67 Riviera. I checked resistance between the stud on the sender and ground (engine block). I started with the engine cold, at fast idle to get the highest reading and then let it warm 5 ~ 10 minutes and checked the reading at idle in gear once it was warm and the choke had opened. Readings summarized below: 1. Engine OFF = 0 Ohms 2. Engine Cold, fast idle = 185 Ohms 3. Engine warm (~5 mins.) in PARK = 142 Ohms 4. Engine warm (5~10 mins.)
    1 point
  29. Looking at what the sensor is looking at is the most straight forward way to find the fault and sometimes you need to update your test equipment so you can see what the sensor is looking at. The onboard diagnostics are good, but not good enough to find some of the irritating problems. So. Before you go tossing an on board computer, or some other pricy part get someone to put an O scope on your alternator and make sure you have clean DC voltage. A bad diode doesn't have to be bad enough to make the lights flicker to cause engine, or other, control problems.
    1 point
  30. I am a great believer in Radials they make a vehicle ride and handle better. BUT they are done in about five years regardless of the miles. They last a bit longer when covered from sunlight. Problem is cracking tread. I just replaced a set of 20 inch radials five years old with just over 1500 miles on them as they were unsafe due to cracks in the tread. If you are just local going to shows cruise night etc bias is the way to go cheaper and seem to be less prone to cracking. The radials are great if you like to travel distance at speed, they ride way better.handle better. run cooler,more tracti
    1 point
  31. Bob: Were you able to source a fuel pick up filter? I had a 1927 standard tank redone to use as a spare for my 1925-25. I tried various searches to find something close with the 5/16" ID and a 9/16" OD, 2 5/8" long. None of the descriptions ever have the OD. So I have several part # for Mopar, Ford and such with 5/16 ID. I will have to go to the parts store to plead with them to find a few to compare.
    1 point
  32. A rough estimate of a complete restoration is 2500 hours. Some will be half of that and others will be double or more. What kills the time line is when you discover, during assembly that a critical part is missing, which halts the assembly and takes six months to a year or longer to locate.
    1 point
  33. Still here, waiting for the hamburgers and macaroni salad to get dished up. I like what Matt writes. Look at his history, some good stuff. I did have a thought. How about grafting that Buick front clip onto a 6 litre Silverado crew cab?? Ta da, all done. Bernie
    1 point
  34. John: You have mentioned in previous posts that you have several lawn mowers hanging around the farm. Well this guy has an idea that you might consider and that may free you up sooner from mowing so you can get back to your car projects:
    1 point
  35. I may be "nice", but I'm not THAT nice!. Okay, the room is spoken for, from Wednesday through Saturday nights. Tues. night is still available, but I doubt if anyone will want it just for that one night. Pete
    1 point
  36. Wow! I showed the pic to my wife, who barely knows a pickup from a sedan. She said, "Is it a Corvette?"
    1 point
  37. Most of the other forums I participate in do not allow discussions on for sale posts. We have a private message system. Someone can start their own thread if a discussion is needed. The one forum that does allow comments has been only positive , never anything negative.
    1 point
  38. This is why I stopped EBay as this is now becoming the standard practice. When I do a search for a car model now everything from typewriters to fuzzy dice fit my car so I just gave up.
    1 point
  39. When re-charging an AC system, we all know a vacuum needs to be applied. Once the system is being sucked bigtime, you have to wait and wait, leave the vac. on there for 20 mins., an hour, or overnight, whatever. This suck job relies on the thermodynamic concepts of entropy and diffusion, which are slow in a typical automotive system. So, here's what I do. I draw the vacuum from the low side a few minutes. Then, I add freon at the high side, just a little bit. What this does is sweep the system. The brand new freon that I let into the high side acts as a carrier for any residual
    1 point
  40. I pick the hottest days to do AC work I pulled out the low-side AC temperature sensor, internally it consists of two heavy gauge leads, with a cylindrical disc of a thermistor material. In my case, the connection between one of the leads and the disc had come undone. Solution ? I bent the leads with needlenose so as to mechanically bias the leads inwardly towards the disc, then... heated it carefully at the edge of the flame of a propane torch, slowly.... When the disc hits the melt temp of the solder, the solder binds to the disc and the sensor is repaired. Measured Ohmage is 1300
    1 point
  41. CAM IS HERE!!! To late for any work or pictures. The Lifters are all dis assembled. I guess that will be an hour or two! Probably not much will get done this weekend. Honey doo , you know. Ben
    1 point
  42. One of the straightest cars I've bought with the most complete running gear under the hood.
    1 point
  43. Hi Keith, Thanks! As you drive your cars have you any thoughts regarding braking? Ever thought it was an issue? Kind Regards Lawrence
    1 point
  44. Longest ride yet in my 41 Century sedanette out to the Oak beach lot and down the ocean drive on eastern Long Island NY's Jones Beach. After having worked on the front suspension and getting an alignment it was time to get off the local 45 mph streets and hit the open road and see what the fastest car in America in 1941 had to offer. My first impression was how light the steering was and how stable the chassis was at speed, very relaxing. It was a hot day but the cabin was very comfortable and surprisingly quite with windows and cowl vent open and door vents closed. Air flow by the open windo
    1 point
  45. 1933 Series 90, model 90 Seven Passenger Sedans. Green is a one owner car I put back together . Black one was originally owned by the DuPont family.
    1 point
  46. OK, here's another of the 24 Boat Top Buick.
    1 point
  47. I mounted the old harness, complete with the light switch housing and fuse/patch panel to an old hollow-core interior door: I wanted to keep the old harness sheathing on for archival purposes, but quickly decided to strip it to facilitate tracing the old wires and examining how they made the various wire junctions at the factory. The sheathing was very easy to remove, disintegrating as I parted it and pulled it off. Years ago I made up a 4’ X 8’ platform consisting of a frame of 2X3s and a Masonite surface for a Rokenbach set my brother Randy gave my boys when they were very young. This platf
    1 point
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