Jump to content

Leaderboard

Popular Content

Showing content with the highest reputation on 06/02/2016 in all areas

  1. Been a while on this one, but I haven't given up. Quick update, and then the latest part of the story - I did find a huge selection of used tires a little south of where I work, which is way to the south side of town. Had to move about 2 miles up the road due (actually back to the house where my '55 46R thread originated) and sell the '51 41D. (And unfortunately, as yet, none of the proceeds from that gets to be rolled back into this 76R.) Moving the 2 cars was fairly involved, though I guess it worked out easier than it could have. I drove the 41D to the destination, swapped the roller rims & used tires onto it, took the "good" rims/tires back to where the 76R sat, put those on. Then it sat for about a month. I don't even recall exactly what defined its "moving day", but some deadline (possibly self-created) had me make the 2-mile drive with the 76R. I hadn't driven it more than 3x around the block to that point, and my wife misunderstood my instructions (to follow directly behind me), so I found myself out on the road alone with this beast. Drive worked good for about a mile, then the trans was slipping. So I shifted to Low. It also was dropping in & out, but it made it. Since my wife wasn't behind me to hit the garage door opener, I had to stop in the street in front of the house. By the time I walked around to open the garage door from the inside, the car wouldn't engage any gear. So I turned it off in the street (perpendicular to traffic, mostly blocking the road, since I had expected to just pull right up). The driveway is only 1 car long, but too much slope to even attempt to push the car, so I hoped a little cool down would let it engage a forward gear. We made this move around 6am on a weekend, so there wasn't any traffic. After some cool-down time, I started it, it engaged Drive, and I pulled it in. I left the "good wheels" on it for about a month, and I took it up & down the street a couple of times (it's a dead-end street, so no around-the-block). It would "slip out" of Drive and Low. I didn't try reverse for far enough to see if that one slipped as well, but going through the manual, this symptom is likely low pump pressure, which could be from seals dried up from 30+ years of not being driven. The "good wheels" had to go with the 41D (they're the wrong size for the 76R anyway), so about a week before the 41D sold, the basically undrivable "roller" wheels/tires went on the 76R. After a couple of months of getting back into this house (installed tile, painted a few rooms, unpacking, etc.) it's about time to get back to doing something on the car. Since the transmission has to come out, the rear end / rear suspension has to come out, so the car needs to be lifted - high. I rechecked Shadetree's '52 thread for his lift experience, and planned the attack. I did a test (pictured) with a single 2x4 (which are well under true 2x4) over two 4x4's at 16" apart (about 9" open span). Didn't even creak. So I know each corner can sit on a single 2x4 over a base 16" wide. Why 16"? Because I can cut 6 16" sections from an 8-foot board length. So I bought 4 8-foot lengths of 4x4 and 2 8-foot lengths of 2x8. I also bought an 8-foot 2x4 - I didn't know why yet. In the picture, you can see what the 4x4 and 2x8's turned into - six "lift platforms". Four of these have the 2x8's spaced to the outside (gap between them) because I thought the gap in the middle could make a good lift handle, and with the other lift platform on top of it, I wanted the 2x8's at the full 16" width for maximum stability. How it went - jack on ground, lift one front corner far enough to insert lift platform. Do same for the other side. Jack on ground, lift far enough to put jack stand under each rear corner (well in front of the back wheels). NOW I know what the 2x4 is for - a JACK lift platform! I had 70" of 4x4 left over from something else, so I cut this in half. Then I cut the 2x4 into 16" lengths. I also had maybe another 5 or 6 2x4 scraps I could cut to 16" lengths to make a "deck" over the 35" 4x4's for the jack. I set this deck on maybe another 2" of particle board and jacked the front corners high enough to stack the 3rd and 4th lift platforms over the first pair. Then jacked the rear (with jack on platform) to put the jack stands on the 5th and 6th lift platforms. This gives the car almost perfectly level with 25" between the frame and the garage floor. Book says 20" minimum to pull the transmission, but I don't know what they assume for your transmission jack. (Car would be almost 3" higher in front with the correct-size tires!) Followed the manual's instructions to pull the rear end. Of course, the last fastener that I did (the left-side spring retainer) was an absolute beast. Due to built-up junk on the bolt thread, I basically ground the thread off in getting that bolt out. I'll post in for sale / wanted - need another one of these (the bolt & the spring retainer plate). By the way, these spring retainers are left-hand thread! I found that completely by chance because after spraying the PB Blaster and letting it sit for a little, I like to attempt to break loose the thread a little by applying some force in the "tighten" direction. In this case, that's the "loosen" direction, and when the bolt turned left-hand style, I knew I could just keep going! Anyway, rear end is fairly straightforward to drop. I expect I'll need help to get the drive shaft lined up to get it back up there, but the pull down wasn't that hard. When the rear tires were down on the ground, I just moved the jack around under the torque tube so it could roll back. I lowered the jack down, and after fumbling around with the front of the torque tube on some 2x4 scraps, I remembered I have wheel dollies, so I put one of those up there. Also put a fluid catch bowl up there. It's leaking what's probably ancient trans fluid out the front of the torque tube.
    4 points
  2. Registration Update June 2, 2016: 1207 Registrants 539 Beautiful Buicks 83 Trailers (Perhaps we should have trailer judging?) 127 Vendor Spaces 697 BCA Banquet 377 BHA Banquet 152 Dorney Cruise In and Picnic
    3 points
  3. 3 points
  4. Personally I always replace the Magnavox with a Delco. Just bolts right in.
    2 points
  5. Not to scare you more, but if your 56 is one ton, you might be missing half of it.
    2 points
  6. Personally, I do not think it is necessary to replace those rivets with anything. If the 5 lug bolts do not hold the drum to the hub, then there are some very major problems.
    2 points
  7. Have so much to do that I can pick somethin different every night! Worked on a piece of stainless that goes around the tub (passenger side). A little more massaging and it will be ready to be put on.
    2 points
  8. Moving along. I may have to stop work on this for a week or 2 and get caught up on a stainless project I promised for mid June.
    2 points
  9. A number of years ago, I had a '70 Skylark Custom (350/350) bench seat, "grandpa's golf car." Added a new vinyl top and did some upholstery repair using NOS material. Repainted in trade for rusted out '83 Riviera that I bought for $500. Please excuse the white sidewalls, they came with the rims and I wanted to take a picture when everything was together. I kept the Seafoam Green with the the dark green interior and dark green vinyl top. Who's the wise guy leaning on the fender?
    2 points
  10. Yeah, not sure why they got rid of that; big mistake. The 65 is just so clean without any headlights showing. And after you have a classic with the hideaway windshield wipers for example, they end up looking clumsy. Clamshells are legend, but you can't beat the 66-67 body style IMO. Personally, I would like to see a Riviera with 65 clamshells, 66-67 space ace pointed front end, 63-34 vents, 71 boat tail rear window and back end that morphs into the 68 rear lights, 1970 side chrome, 455 engine, and skirts, 67 Aluminum star wars air cleaner with the aluminum GS covers, and of course a 66-68 center console shifter. O and of course I would add a phantom front window, silver arrow tri-steering wheel, and some Pegasus styling! Man, I think we just need to actually MAKE the concept Pontiac Scorpion and Call it the Ultimate Riviera!
    2 points
  11. '49 Ford Coupe. FH V-8 not running/stuck. Interior cloth no good. Solid and complete car. Dings and a dented door. Have title. Located near Dubuque, Iowa. cell; 8zero5,two35,two87two.
    1 point
  12. They are only interested in the bottom line which often is NOT the actual bottom line! Hence the $15/hr demands for unskilled labor which will encourage the folks who provide those jobs to automate.
    1 point
  13. Some of my Buicks.....Tootsie Toy "Y" job, a couple of Brooklin '39 convertibles custom built by John Roberts, and a pewter Reatta done in 1988 for the Select 60 dealers, Pacesetter awards, and at Pewter 53 Skylark done sometime in the '70's
    1 point
  14. Got my distributor back from Jason at Advanced Electrical Rebuilders. It's going to be a slight delay in starting the engine since I have the transmission out at the moment, but it's coming soon.
    1 point
  15. Having done this (too many times), I feel your pain: back, neck, knees...
    1 point
  16. Being behind the counter is a foot up on being in the right place at the right time. I was in the boat business in my past life and many people that needed to sell, or garage cleaning or for whatever reason would come to me with boat stuff. That doesn't happen anymore as I am retired and don't have that connection any more. Also being a car guy there would often be some antique or hot rod parked around the place (we were on the main highway) and people would stop by to talk about their treasures.
    1 point
  17. Willis is exactly correct for the Electra and LeSabre series. The Centurion and Riviera also had optional the "modified high performance V8 with dual exhaust" option. This option included the large valve heads from the A-body GS Stage 1 and a slightly hotter camshaft. The valves themselves were not swirl polished as they were in the GS A bodies. I have the optional engine in my '72 Centurion convertible.
    1 point
  18. Darla, our AACA Forum has a Buy-Sell section, and anyone can list cars there for free. Following the advice above is important: Describe the cars accurately, provide contact information, include photos of the exterior, interior, and engine compartment. Also, you'll want to price the cars accurately--not judging by other people's ASKING prices, but by reasonable selling prices. The market is okay, not booming, and overpriced cars just languish. Our forum doesn't reach nearly the number of people that www.hemmings.com does. That website is based on the popular magazine Hemmings Motor News, and is the foremost place to sell cars such as yours. There are several good price guides: www.nada.com. They would tend to be on the high side. www.hagerty.com. They are in the business of valuing and insuring collectible cars. And probably the most used is Old Cars Report Price Guide. It comes out every 2 months on newsstands; and they have an annual book that can be found at this link: http://www.amazon.com/2017-Collector-Car-Price-Guide/dp/1440246750 [revised link, hoping this one works!] Your 1959 Cadillac could generate quite a lot of interest if it's accurately priced. Even your 1974 Cadillac has collector value. Ask any more questions you want, and the car hobbyists on this site will provide plenty of advice. All the best to you on your sale!
    1 point
  19. Sorry, Padgett, jargon isn't helpful. As an experienced car hobbyist, even I don't know what you mean.
    1 point
  20. If you need a heat shield to protect the starter, then you should replace the starter. Chances are this is just the solenoid however. The chances are better that you have some corrosion at one or more battery terminal ends. First place I would start is the negative terminal, where it grounds to the frame or engine. Remove and clean the end, as well as the frame mount point. PS, this includes the braided ground straps at the back of the motor to the firewall.
    1 point
  21. Also, after reading the multiple articles in the Riview on the development of the 71 Riviera, it is clear that the original design was going to be something very similar to the scorpion. Some wanted a pure form, but in the end the design was certainly compromised due to cost saving measures (cowards!). In the 71 GS however, the sleek design for looks is only the beginning. It had an on board computer for adjusting to different terrains in 1971, thats early technology. The standard quick steering ratio, supped up carb and cams (455 engine from hell), upgraded handling, wrap around batman dash, hero drum breaks, and many other perfected applications. A 1971 GS Riviera is basically a luxury sports tank. I do believe that one of the biggest mistakes was put forward in 71 however. A plastic grill.......really? I can only imagine they did the math and figured no matter how many they had to replace, it would still save money. My guess is that they got many complaints about this and switched back the next year.
    1 point
  22. One of the best things that has happened to '37 and '38 owners is a index of all the old Torque Tube magazines. They are a goldmine of information. You can find the index here. It is well worth the time to search it out http://www.1937and1938buicks.com/The-Torque-Tube/The-Torque-Tube.htm. Sure to check the Technical index that links subjects to particular issues of the magazine. It goes from 1982 to 2006 Don
    1 point
  23. There are a number of vendors who advertise in the Riview who should be able to help you.
    1 point
  24. I may be wrong, but I think of brake shoes being lined with soft or hard linings. Softer linings will wear out the shoes faster, but are preferable. The harder linings may generate more heat and heat can lead to fading. Further, multiple people have complained about todays relined shoes not stopping as well, and the response of the community is to have the shoes relined with softer material. In addition, even if softer linings wear faster, chances are the reduced mileage a collectible car is used will more than offset the reduced number of miles the brakes will last.
    1 point
  25. There is no safety benefit to a dual-circuit master cylinder, in my experience that claim is a myth. I had a front rubber hose blow on my 2002 Jeep Liberty that has a dual circuit master cylinder and I had zero brakes. Dual circuit master cylinders work on the same principles as a single circuit and still require primed fluid in order for the system to work. If one system fails and drains fluid from a reservoir, then you're still pushing against air and you have zero brakes. For the logic of a dual circuit to make sense, you would need two separate, enclosed master cylinders that work in tandem with each other. That's why I scrapped the crap and put the original one back in. The newer boot I had bought was solid. Yours may work, but it may cause a vacuum leak. I don't have a vacuum bleeder so I can't comment, but I did bleed the system without a helper. I just left the bleed nut open with a piece of surgical tubing immersed in brake fluid and would do four or five pumps and check to fill the reservoir and check the bottle for bubbles. As for brake linings, the bonded ones from NAPA seem to work fine for me.
    1 point
  26. No doubt many of you are wondering if and what will be my next project. A good friend has offered to sell me an mid 1920s Austin Seven chassis frame for a very reasonable $250. After giving this some thought I came up with the following. It is long time since my last Austin so I am uncertain about current values. Looking at one or two car sales web sites and e-bay it seems as though restored Austins sell for on average between $15 and 20,000. My approximate costing of a very basic rebuild NOT including all the other parts required to build a rolling chassis works out to something between $20 and 25,0000 NOT including labour. I seem to have been down that path before! Bj.
    1 point
  27. Yes sir! Will do. Luckily this thing was in pretty amazing condition when I picked it up for a steal and I've only owned her for a couple years so it's only now that I'm starting to start maintaining some of the old systems that the previous owner maintained fairly well too. The master cylinder and steering gear rebuilds were kind of forced so I haven't taken the time to get a manual YET, but I definitely intended to already.
    1 point
  28. A lot of semantics and twisting of the facts and meanings of words. This year was the 100th race, but it was not the 100th anniversary of the Indy 500. The 100th anniversary took place 100 years after the inaugural race. If you don't take Wifey out for dinner on your anniversary, it still counts.............if you survive.
    1 point
  29. IMHO, if the stylist are going to put vents in the side of a car, they should be functional.
    1 point
  30. There are places in U.S. that do great pot metal restoration but it is costly. If you are willing to pay for it there is a place in Chicago "The Finishing Touch" that will make them better than new. They have done stuff for me before and I'll be making a drive over there soon to drop off a couple items. I would be happy to facilitate getting a couple done for you with no markup by me if you have some crusty cores and are out of options.
    1 point
  31. Yes this is old thread but I still hear there are only old people that like old cars. This past weekend I was at the Car and Parts Swap meet in Springfield, Ohio. I saw lots of under 40 folks with their kids along with even younger couples. Like Gil in the previous post, I let kids sit in my 1912 McLaughlin-Buick at cruises and take them for rides when I can. Last Summer after finally getting the rear end back in after lot of time and cash, I took it to a Cars and Coffee event in Cincinnati near my house. As I got their a bit later in the morning, parking was tight, so a maneuvered in near a Lambo or some super car. The owner was very nervous when I was parking. The McLaughlin got much more attention along with usual questions about right hand drive and the carbide tank. My wife has made signs about those to cut down on the questions. I let all the kids that show any interest sit in the car and try to grab the bulb horn. We have has some success getting younger members in our local AACA club too. It just takes time and effort to get e-mail addresses at events and following up with copies of newsletters or Facebook post. Tom Muth Cincinnati, Ohio
    1 point
  32. I literally just did this last night before going to bed, I was up until 3 am in the driveway and had the same issues as you. Before I tore into my system, it lasted 5 minutes after sitting on the shelf and I had to completely redo the inside. The brakes work great now! The issue you're having is a very large air pocket that is formed by filling the reservoir with air in the system. At the brake proportioning block, there is a rubber diaphragm check valve that keeps the fluid primed in the lines since the master cylinder is below the wheel cylinders. I started at the wheel cylinder closest to the master and attached a piece of surgical tubing to the bleed nut, which ended in a glass bottle. I opened the nut and waited until fluid began to pass and bubbles stopped coming out. I closed the bleeder and did this to all four wheels until I was the rear farthest from the master. What I then did was I kept the bleeder on the farthest open and got in the car and just started pumping the brake pedal all the way to the toe board. After 5 pumps, I would check the fluid reservoir and fill if required. It took maybe 30 minutes to get the first burp out and it was a huge air pocket. You'll know when you get close to the big bubble because the pedal gets almost ridiculously hard to go to the floor and then a sudden release in pressure as the line clears. After the large air bubble passes, and there were probably about three large bubbles, I kept bleeding the line until the foam stopped appearing. I then closed the bleeder and went to the driver rear cylinder and did the same thing. So on and so forth. When you get back to the front driver side wheel cylinder and finish pumping the fluid out, I then went back to the passenger rear cylinder and did it all over again until there were no traces of foam or bubbles in the line. It's a lot of patience, but the bubble eventually works its way out. All in all it took me an hour and a half to get the brakes properly bled. I used a large bottle of the Valvoline 3+4. I also have a 1956 Buick Century, but mines a 2 door. Also word of advice and ditch that pushrod boot. If you still have the original one, use that. Those narrow neck pushrod boots will be sucked inwards by internal vacuum of the unit and close off the power piston operation cycle. When I had a boot like that, it would create a seal around the power piston and constantly pull the brake pedal down to the applied position. When I switched back to the original boot, the booster operated as it should and I have been happy since. I initially adjusted the brakes to five clicks out on the adjuster per the shop manual but this is too much because the manual says the applied position should be an inch from the toe board and the applied position for me is almost at the toe board. So when you adjust the brakes, try to set it initially at 3-4 clicks out from their fully extended position (adjust shoes out until you can't rotate the wheel by hand then adjust back in). Hope this helps! Let me tell you I went to a modern setup and the original blows the socks off any modern system you can fit down there. The car stops like any modern car, just don't get crazy with it and downshift down the big hills.
    1 point
  33. In 1984 while in college my very dear friend Bill loved his '66 7-litre coupe, as he called it. It was emberglo with a cream-white top. It had no rust but did have a few small dents and well weathered paint. Bill worked nights and weekends at a movie theater to help fund a paint job. Bill was a brilliant Engineering Physics major but he suffered greatly from cystic fibrosis. One summer, Bill went to do intern work in Flint MIchigan but he left the car in Oklahoma. Unbeknownst to Bill, his older brother and I began our work to straighten and repaint that car. With many paint jobs under my belt in my uncle's shop, we were easily able to finish it and surprised him upon his return that fall. That horrible disease soon took my friend away and I never knew the fate of that car. You never know who you are going to touch and in what way. Your project is special to me because it brings back memories of my friend and I love seeing this work done right. Thank you! Joel
    1 point
  34. It's okay, Gary... As long as it's done by October for our Kansas Buick show!
    1 point
  35. Can you use something from the electrician's bag of tricky tools? I am thinking of a stiff wire poked in from each end to come out where the full loom goes in, tape to the respective connectors or wires and pull through? I expect it will take a fair bit of fiddling around and some special strong words to get them through. If you have any old wires in there, you could pull a cord through when you pull them out and use that cord to pull each end pf the new loom through.
    1 point
  36. WOOOOOOOOOOOOOW!!!! That is GORGEOUS!!
    1 point
  37. All 8 of the needed threaded holes existed in the floor. I'm not sure how many or what holes were used for the power-adjusted seat, but this one lines right up. I cleaned out the holes with a small wire brush, some PB Blaster, a 5/16-24 bolt, and finally a 5/16-24 tap. Got some replacement bolts (3/4" long, original was maybe 5/8") & star washers and got the bottom bolted in. Got the backs on. Getting the pin through the center for the 2nd seat back was the hardest part since it's one pin through both seat backs. I put the retention clips on so the backs won't fall off. It's quite a bit higher at the front of the seat than the little bench I had made, but sitting on it, it's lower than I thought it would be.
    1 point
  38. 1930 Big Eight as far as I can work out. Seems to be just that one model.
    1 point
  39. Here are a few pictures now that the body is back from sandblasting. Very solid only a few spots to repair...
    1 point
  40. Thanks for all the information everyone. Here are some pictures of the engine now that it's back from rehab. Just need some time to get her together. Another step closer, and if I could catch a weather break I could get the car back from blasting....lol
    1 point
  41. Well, its been awhile but life has taken an interesting turn which has allowed me to start work on completing this project. Here is a link to some pictures of the dis-assembly and before and after pictures of the seats. Body is scheduled to go off to the body shop in the next week or so to fix the rot and sandblast everything else including the frame. I would do it myself but they have a jig and can get to the bottom side to blast primer and paint way easier than I can. Hope to have it back soon so that I can get the rest of the body blocked in and painted this summer when I come home for a visit. Does anyone know what color these engines were from the factory in 1941? Thanks https://picasaweb.google.com/uscgjason/1941PontiacDisassembly?authuser=0&feat=directlink
    1 point
  42. :)My brouther-in-law found a old 60s caddy herse at a local yard. Burried in the mud and siting on the frame. He poured some gas in it and the darn thing started and ran like new. He wanted the engine and tranny,so we dug it up and he bought it. Befor we pulled the motor he took a wire brush to the bumpers,gave the thing a bath and drove it to a local show. Took second place in special intrest and P O a bunch.
    1 point
  43. While junkyard shopping in central Wa. I talked to a guy that mentioned a 63 Plymouth on a farm nearby. I checked it out and turned out to be a 63 Belvedere 2dr htp. Max wedge minus engine. $200. I drug it home with the intention of putting an 11 sec. 440 together. Two weeks later the farmer called me back and said "Hey I found the original eng/pushbutton trans. $500." I bolted it togethor fiddeled with a couple days and ran high 11s. After a nice resto it brought 80K.
    1 point
  44. How about this... a 1969 GTO Judge, complete with it's RamAir-IV engine. Of course that was in 1982.
    1 point
  45. It's not car orientated, but I got a 1916 Indiana scout for $50....
    1 point
×
×
  • Create New...