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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/17/2016 in all areas

  1. Since Adam made this car so dang shiny, I have started to upgrade the chrome pieces that were not as shiny, starting with the rear bumper. Here it is last weekend at the first show of the season!
    6 points
  2. Until he paints SCALLOPS on at least one FITTY FO, he is just a moderator,. IMO Dale in Indy
    4 points
  3. I think most of us would like to know at least a first name and where in the country some of you live. I personally like to address folks by their real name vs their user id but can't always ( more like never) remember their names. It would also be nice to know what part of the country you are in. And also what year/model Buick you have would be nice too So please consider adding a signature by going to the top right hand corner of the page, clicking the down arrow next to your id, then click account settings then signature. That will bring up a box that you may enter whatever i
    3 points
  4. Matt, go to Profile then Edit Profile then in the Member Title add whatever describes you, as you can see I just revised mine.
    3 points
  5. I'd very strongly recommend that you remove the oil pan and clean both it and the oil pump intake screen before considering starting the engine. And do it before you run the oil pump ! To not do so, even if you were to use a non-detergent oil for the initial start-up, is just begging for trouble down the line.
    2 points
  6. And they will outlast many pairs of replacement tube shocks. If you keep them full of fluid they will never wear out. The only things that goes wrong are leaks and links. Rebuilders will fix the leaks (or you can fix yourself --- see my website); links are available replacement items. The reason they went to tube shocks: they are cheaper!
    2 points
  7. The Cascada has the potential to bring a lot of interest to Buick-- especially if it proves as reliable as the most reliable models on today's market. I'm not so sold on the high rear end, though, as it takes away from the grace of the car's profile. Offering more than the current 6 blase colors would carry them farther. With so many cars in mall parking lots being gray, and many others being black, white, and the same pedestrian tones, Buick could be a stand-out if they offered 15 paint colors--at at least 4 interior colors--as they did for many
    2 points
  8. Looks like an invasion of Storm Troopers.
    2 points
  9. Dale, I just returned from the museum. I took a lot of photo's and measured a lot of dimensions. The museum staff there gave me some photo's of the Bug that they have, when the cowling was off for some engine work. The way that the Bug is constructed, the cowling is actually the front half of the body, and comes off as one unit. You will be able to see that in the photo's. There are more photo's than i can post here, so if you will PM me you mailing address, I will send you a photo CD and a list of measurements that I took. The museum staff was impressed with the photo's of your Miller t
    2 points
  10. No rim code, 2 inch hole (no bigger!) for caps, Has a ring on the back side, part number 123377. I know that because I am an RoA member! See attachment...
    2 points
  11. Ed, Thank You, in the past I have taken a straight on side photo shot, and once I knew the overall length, I could then scale the lines, etc from that. I then have enlarged the photo to the length I wanted, or the scale I was wanting. In this case I want a 1/4th. scale, it will be my largest model. So if wheel base is 100", then I will build to 25". If length of the Buick Bug is 160". which I don't know to be fact, then the model will be 40". I am excited about this build, it will be my FIRST all 'Buick' build. My GM FuturLiner is Buick inspired, as is t
    2 points
  12. Thinking about selling the 33 PD because another project has come up I would like to allocate these funds for. Wondering what other people might value it at. It seems to be in original condition. I do not see anything missing either. No rust or body damage. Worst part is the motor is tired but still runs fairly well yet. It smokes especially going down hill. Othetwise great oil pressure and no overheating since cleaning up the radiator and water passages. Only thing not factory is the hidden voltage regulator in the generator. Interior is in tack but is starting to dry rot from age.
    1 point
  13. Dale, if you can PM me your mailing address, I'll get that material out to you tomorrow.
    1 point
  14. To see one in real life they look nothing like a Sebring. Much different stance and much more sculptured. The new grill bar appears to be the new face of Buick - it also throws back to the grill bars in the 55/56/57 Buicks so there is a heritage tie there.
    1 point
  15. 1 point
  16. Hi, that's probably for what are called #6 wheels, possibly the smaller #5 size { I don't have any caps nearby to measure}. They were used on quite a few higher end makes, in roughly the 1926- 1933 era. Standard on a few, an extra cost option on many. No trucks as far as I know. Look at nearly any Duesenberg J photo and you will see # 6 wheels . Likewise many Stutz vertical 8's used # 5's. The slightly earlier pin drive style wheels used a different system to lock and release the caps and a different style of wrench.
    1 point
  17. padgett, The DOT labels are a legal requirement so no deduction is taken. The correct reproduction tires are available so switching to a non-authentic tire does result in a point deduction. The bias ply tires are not unsafe so switching to radials is not a "safety item". Seat belts are allowed without deduction as a safety item.
    1 point
  18. Yes. But you'll have to remove the register ring inside the wheel. The wheels will no longer be "hub centric" but there are many of us '63 and '64 owners who have made this switch. The wheels will be centered with the lug nuts rather than the register ring. Anytime you see a '63 or '64 Riviera with the factory rally wheels, you know that this is the case. One exception, IF you find a set of '64 wheels, they'll not have the register ring, but they were only available on the WIldcat. Those wheels were not available as an option on the Riviera until 1965. Ed
    1 point
  19. "Best Moderator in Cyberspace!" I like it.
    1 point
  20. Dave, YOU is the man!!!!!!!! Thank You very much, and YES I would be happy to display the BUG at the museum. As stated B4, I am going after MORE detail than any build B4, my father is probably looking down and cheering me on, he was/is a very loyal Buick guy. Dale in Indy
    1 point
  21. As far has the horizontal bar across the grille goes - yeah, that's a bit Chrysler-ish, but otherwise I don't think it looks a bit like a Sebring. I think the Buick looks more muscular where the petnastar looks pretty milquetoast to me. Maybe the Buick isn't quite International Raceway material, but the only central Florida vision that comes to my mind when looking at the Chrysler is blue-hairs clogging up US 27 in the town of its namesake. Another thought on the grille: Waterfall - Cascade - Cascada... How did they miss that?
    1 point
  22. A breaker bar maybe, but I would put the truck in high gear and hook a chain to it and pull gently with the Jimmy. If that doesn't work try pulling backwards. If you pull so hard that it slides you may bend a rod. So, pull gently !! I have knocked engines loose by using the high gear method and simply rocking the car by hand to pop them loose.
    1 point
  23. X2 - my initial reactions exactly. The least it needs is a waterfall grill.
    1 point
  24. After doing a quick search, it looks like they used Rochester and Carters just like Buick. When I was looking, I only noticed the silencer on 55 to 57 models. I haven't seen the silencer on any other GM car.
    1 point
  25. If you are going to actually drive it any distance, go with the new chassis, but keep the old one, restore it and store it away. Best of both worlds! You will be safer for road trips as the newer chassis will have better brakes, better ride, better economy, more power (especially if you go with a diesel) and better reliability not to mention part availability while away from home. If you don't plan to go many miles, restore the chassis, repair all that is needed and live life! Like it has been said before, the danger in splits are while mounting. If they blow at just ab
    1 point
  26. I hope it changes as the southern NJ folks have planned a good one and best yet it is closest event to me only a 3 hour tow. Same 3 hrs as the Virginia Beach last year Robert
    1 point
  27. Groan.... Groannnn Groannnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnn
    1 point
  28. Thank you for expounding on the subject, Mike!! Ben
    1 point
  29. John et. al.: This question applies to many different years and many different marques. So if John is asking to put a year in the title, it is not applicable to just one year. If you request is not adding the year, please clarify your request.
    1 point
  30. Agree with the marvel oil and the breaker bar but would add some PB-Blaster to the brew. If you can't find MMO, ATF+Blaster will work well also. Inject oil & Blaster and put the plugs back in. Then pull the plugs before you try to turn. I'd also change the oil one quart short and add a quart of Dextron ATF (20 wt super high detergent). Run a couple of hours at varying speeds low/no load then change the oil & filter again. Twer me I'd use a high milage synthetic the second time. Any more the cost difference between dino and synthetic is in the noise.
    1 point
  31. Good looking Ford. Don't worry the 351 will pull that car around very nicely. So would have the 390 if it was still there. You didn't mention the type of transmission. Anyway, I would drain and refill, what ever transmission is in it. If it is an automatic, pull the pan and change the filter also. intimeold
    1 point
  32. I'm on it ! . Anyone want to buy a Titan set , I'll take 41.75 for it ( slightly used )
    1 point
  33. This 1930, 8 Sport Phaeton has been for sale in the CCCA newsletter the last few months.
    1 point
  34. You don't understand, fast in a paint job or fast in a restoration usually is spelled CRAP. I don't mean to be harsh, but good paint jobs take prep work, good restorations take time, sometimes lifetimes!
    1 point
  35. I have filled the hole with JB Weld and filed it smooth. I have put on a new gasket along with the steel plate that goes between the gasket and the carb. Hopefully this will keep any more damage from being done.
    1 point
  36. Let's go back to the gooey stuff on the shoes and drums. Your front wheel bearing seal is bad. That's wheel bearing grease on the drums and shoe. It will cause a wheel to lock in a heart beat even with little pressure. Pull the seal out of the drum. Pack the bearings with wheel bearing grease and install a new seal. You will most likely never get this out of the shoes, so plan on replacing them. You should be in good shape after thisl
    1 point
  37. * I am not much of a poetry writer; or, at least, I was not, until I was introduced to a short & sweet form. Then, I wrote 4 & several more in rapid succession, including this 1 about music & radio: http://www.oldcarsstronghearts.com/2016/05/15/daily-dose-savvy-sun-63/ ALSO linked are 3 more describing: cars & life (Monday), my repaired heart (Wednesday) & the road as my home (Friday). Bet we all know of or have participated in a father-son project, but how about a grandfather-grandson project? This smart Ford Model A was done by a friend & his grandfa
    1 point
  38. For any swap meet I would like to see a reserved area for mostly vintage/prewar cars and parts,It would save a lot of walking.
    1 point
  39. I prefer the large photos as it's easier to see detail due to the clarity.
    1 point
  40. I would use the factory brake setup. Why do so many folks think they must go to disc brakes?
    1 point
  41. OK, here's another of the 24 Boat Top Buick.
    1 point
  42. Use the suppliers for convenience (that's what they are counting on) and for the parts that are available nowhere else. Also remember that paying more for some of their parts keeps them in business when you need them and keeps obscure parts available at a decent price. And thank NAPA for keeping the availability of these parts at decent prices...other parts stores are selling the same stuff (if they have it) under the "Rare Parts" brand at close to Buick supplier prices. Willie
    1 point
  43. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=zI8TXhxIp8w Some video of my car running. You will notice a lot of exterior parts missing...only because they have been removed and stored away.
    1 point
  44. Roger, As I have said before your work is amazing. Larry
    1 point
  45. Didn't Ford offer disk brakes in 66 (may have been on the T'bird). None of my cars stay stock for long (Judge had drums, now has disks) but that and a dual master I'd consider "safety of family". 4 wheel disks are nice but fronts do most of the work so I would not bother with rears.
    1 point
  46. Bump your AAA towing to 100 miles and drive the hell out of it. Fix what breaks and drive it some more. Keep your cell phone in your pocket and if you feel uneasy about the car only shut it off at friends houses. Thoroughly study and have a firm understanding of the concepts of this set of laws: http://www.murphys-laws.com/murphy/murphy-true.html. Then you'll know by getting the extended coverage you will probably never need it. I bought that extra coverage when I got my first Jaguar, thinking it the prudent thing to do. My Wife thinks it's funny
    1 point
  47. Congratulations on your purchase! Many people use antique cars without converting to a dual brake system; and millions of people drove billions of miles on those original brake systems. So while a dual system does give extra protection, don't think of the original configuration as some imminent catastrophe that must be avoided at all costs. I have a few old cars, and have driven them for years, with their original single reservoir system. And, I may add, the original drum brakes on all four wheels can stay. Do people add disk br
    1 point
  48. Stopping is a good thing so a complete exam of the brake system should be a priority. Changing out the fluids is also a good thing to do as well as checking for leaks. Enjoy your new toy! Terry
    1 point
  49. 1 point
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