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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/10/2016 in all areas

  1. This past Tuesday, May 3, Mike and Nancy Book; BCA President Brian Clark and I flew over to Allentown and spent the day with 50 or so folks who will be touching the 50th Anniversary Buick Celebration. For many, it was our first face to face as we walked through each and every hour from our arrival for set up on Monday morning, July 25 until/through our departure on Sunday, July 31. It is a daunting task to plan for so many from so far away! First, we are now able to offer a baseball ticket opportunity for the Tuesday evening baseball game at Iron Pigs, across the street from the show field. Buicks at the Ballpark • Tuesday, July 26th, 2016 C’mon out and enjoy America’s favorite past-time! The Lehigh Valley Iron Pigs have invited the Buick Club of America to their baseball game on Tuesday night, July 26. The Iron Pigs are a AAA level professional minor league team. The game starts at 7:05 pm, and prior to the start of the game the BCA has been invited to bring some Buicks representing various decades and models to do a “parade lap” around the ball field. The first 100 people to sign up for attending the game will receive a FREE ticket to the game. All signing up after that would have a $10.00 per ticket cost, but with that ticket you receive $2.00 complimentary towards your food and beverages at the game! Arriving early and looking for something to do??? What could be more fun than getting together with Buick friends and having a ballpark hot dog, peanuts and a beverage while watching a baseball game?? To sign up, contact the Buick Club Office at 614-472-3939 or buickcluboffice@aol.com. Second, we passed another milestone as we reached our 500th (actually 505) car registration. We are up to 1104 attendees; 655 at the BCA Banquet; 353 at the BHA Banquet; and 147 for our cruise in and picnic at Dorney. There are many surprises that the 50th Anniversary Team has in store for you as you spend the last week of July, celebrating the Spirit of Buick in Allentown, Pa.
    4 points
  2. Just picked it up Friday! 450 miles home - like driving my whole house from my favorite chair!
    3 points
  3. 2 points
  4. We don't know the state this car was found in before this abhorrent "work" began, but I see a couple of misconceptions being stated over and over again. The idea of rod building being cheaper than restoring to original is blown apart by how much these guys invest in these projects. For the money they have into them a restoration back to original would be a comparable expense, unless we are talking rat rod (which this car wasn't headed for). The fact that cars are rodded with intact bodies and flawless body and paint work tells us that the car wasn't "too far gone", or we wouldn't be looking at it with an absolute straight body and beautiful paint, we'd be looking at your typical rat-rod, with rust/patina, rust out holes and the "as found" faults that a rat rod has. The fact that the car is seen completed with a straight, beautifully finished body tell us that this is a choice, and we are two different kinds of people, as different and as intense as religions. We antique/classic/original car guys see the car as a piece out of time and we are the current caretakers. They see the original car, in whatever condition (including a well running older restoration) as inherently broken, and in need of the "#1 Summit Catalog" treatment of a Mexican-built Chevy engine, T-H transmission, GM Tilt column, Ford 9" rear end, repro Rustang II front end, E-Z wiring harness, Classic Air AC, the same seats, and lastly, of late--very minimal sidewall large diameter tires and wheels, for all of the heavy G-force formula 1 driving they plan on doing (sic). They are the automotive equivalent of high school girls who all want to be like that one cool girl in school, whether or not they can pull it off. The rodders claim "I want to drive my car" and that our original cars "can't be driven". We know better, of course. They have climbed every mountain there is to climb with Ford, Chevy and Plymouth cars, and are looking for the rod no one else has, hence the run of Graham Sharknose cars that have been rodded lately. It's not as though everyone in the antique/classic restoration community was given a crack at buying this rare Cadillac, all turned it down and it's either rod or being smelted into razor blades and household appliances. They are publishing articles showing nicely restored cars, as they bought them, then progress shots of the butchery, then the finished product. Dang near every show on cable TV that deals with old cars is about rodding, save for Wayne Carini. In conclusion, I don't buy into the idea that "the car was too far gone, they had to do this". The numbers don't support that. It's a choice. One I don't agree with.
    2 points
  5. Even today, when many people modify cars, they often concentrate on the engine and the power it can produce. Even when more contemporary steering systems are involved, it rarely includes a collapsible steering shaft. Old school hot rodders, if that's what your "hero" is, rarely worried about things automotive beyond the horsepower of the largest, most powerful engine they could drop into a car. Us/we "Old School Guys" rarely worried about unimportant things such as steering, brakes etc. Of course, we were younger then and indestructible. Cheers, Grog
    2 points
  6. The non-original wood framing in my Flint built 1925-45 needs to be replaced, and I will begin by modifying this existing wood framing until it can be used as a pattern for making new. Since the Front Seat platform wood was completely missing, it looks like a good place to start. I mocked up the Front seat wood after examining photos from a mix of Standard and Master. Holden wood framing is slightly different in the front seat area, so I made a few guesses about how the Flint built wood should look. This area is usually all covered up with upholstery so is very difficult to get a clear idea of how it really goes together. In the photos below are numbered dimensions needed, indicated by D-, and questions Q-. I made all these mock up parts real quick & dirty from scrap wood, so the craftsmanship should not be graded here, just point out what looks wrong and set me straight. Also needed is the thickness of these wood pieces. thank you Kevin BCA # 47712
    1 point
  7. Those engines are mounted on a rubber insulator fastened to a large bracket in front of the engine which is bolted to the frame. When I mounted mine , I just used a piece of 2x4 under the front pulley to support it. You can see the bracket in the photo, it passes behind the dampener.
    1 point
  8. 1931 Cadillac Convertible, rare survivor, drives and handles great, 353cu." L-head- eight cylinder 95 HP engine, nice but not a show car, has dual side mount tires and tire covers, 06541 on odometer (unconfirmed), current owner has owned it 12 years and knew the car since 1965; car has been driven 2000-3000 miles in last 50 years, wire spoke wheels are in nice condition, car drives great ; compression is a little low on one cylinder even though you don't notice it driving down the road, $62,500, 336-765-8312, North Carolina, owned by elderly collector who is selling out his collection, delivery suggestions available.
    1 point
  9. 1 point
  10. Is this car going to serve as a weekend "toy" or be serving two purposes everyday transportation and a toy? I always recommend buying a second generation Corvair as an entry level vehicle. I never owned one but friends have. You can even get a convertible for under 10K that is turn key, parts are plentiful and rather cheap, and a network of club support. Mid 70's Caddy's are also a good bang for the buck, as pointed out some parts are not that easy to come by, as I recall some of the A/C parts are unique to Cadillac's and can be pricey if you even able to find them.
    1 point
  11. It has nothing to do with racism and everything to do illegals having valid drivers license and .most of the time no insurance.
    1 point
  12. Agree for $12k you should be able to find something nice for about 2/3 particularly if you want a sedan rather than a coupe and then have another 1/3 for "making it right". Once you reach 1970 many things start becoming standard like AC, disk brakes, and power everything. 1973 was the peak for the Great American Land barge and minimal MPG. You had to get into the 80s before lockup-OD transmissions and FI small V8s become popular and MPG started going up again. You might also want something that runs on unleaded regular (75 & later). For a big American car of any vintage you want at least a 5 liter V-8 and not a 4 (or less) liter V6. It wasn't until the 90s that a big car like an Intrigue or LeSabre worked well with a 3800 V6.
    1 point
  13. If you don't mind big, a 1978 Lincoln Town Car with a factory moon roof and the 460 cubic inch V8 would be spectacular. They have an incredible presence and turn heads in modern day traffic like you can't believe. Unlike the mechanical brakes on a Model A, you get reasonably modern components in a vehicle that easily cruises at 70-75 mph as long as you don't mind feeding it. You can make a great double-date night and your guests will be coddled in the back seat. Now, on your 60 mile round trip to work you might consume 5 gallons of gas ($15) instead of 3 gallons of gas ($9). That's what 12 mpg looks like instead of 20. For a daily driver, these would take you to the poor house, but as an occasional car every drive will be an Occasion! $7500 should find you a low mileage, very original car. Take your time and enjoy the search.
    1 point
  14. David, if those glasses make everything look bigger maybe I need to get my wife a pair.
    1 point
  15. Thank you for checking. I know that the port holes are different but we would have filled them in. I am having a tough time finding a 51/52 hood hood here in So Cal.
    1 point
  16. I noticed a couple of Cadillacs popped up in your search. If you're even REMOTELY considering a Cadillac, the 66 will come into your budget way moreso than a 57. Both of which, parts are so-so to find. But, 77-78-79 Cadillacs should be seriously considered. They are becoming more popular and prices seem to be slowly inching upwards on them. $12000 for a sedan will get you a very fine example of a sedan with low mileage. Parts are still easy to come by, they're fairly easy to work on, and one of the most reliable, comfortable Cadillacs that keep up with modern traffic very well, gobs of power, can fit in most garages, and are quite elegant cars.
    1 point
  17. Common problem, very difficult to find a good replacement. The 1950's gurus can correct me if I'm wrong (I'm more of a '60s guy), but I think 1952 was the only year with a 4-barrel carburetor on the Straight 8 engine. That's what makes it so rare, it is a one-year-only part, and only on the Roadmaster. There have been many discussions on how to repair them, but all the repair methods seem to fail after a while. I think most people with the problem end up having someone make a new one. Having said that, a 1952 Roadmaster is a neat car, so I wouldn't let a manifold issue steer you away from getting it. Just realize what you're up against.
    1 point
  18. You guys are doing quite the job. Thanks............Bob
    1 point
  19. Will be interesting to see how the market treats these cars down the road. The Ford based traditional hot rods have a link to an interesting era/movement with lasting power that transcends generations (check out the traditional hot rod set or the crowd at TROG, not all grey hair, if anyone is keeping track..) and is likely an era that will interest collectors for some time. These non traditional hot rods are different, I think. I mean these cars based on unusual candidates and unfortunately at times nice old originals or even restored cars seem to me like they lack that staying power. Anyone else remember the custom van craze of the mid-late 70s - all but forgotten and certainly nearly worthless today, an anomaly with very few interest from today's collectors. These things feel like the same to me when their current fans age out - no sticking power, but the damage is done.
    1 point
  20. According to the parts book, no. 51 or 52 special hood only. Also, the ventiports on a 50 are in the hood, not on the fenders like a 51-52.
    1 point
  21. I have just replaced the outer torque ball retainer kit & etc. on my '51 Riviera and cannot see how it would be possible to do the job without totally removing the rear axle assembly which, with some planning, is not really all that difficult or time consuming. Here are your next steps: Disconnect torque tube from torque ball by removing bolts at flange. Disconnect links from shock absorber arms. With the weight of the vehicle still on the wheels (or axle jacked way up), disconnect the radius rod (panhard bar) at right end. (After disconnecting, pull the the right hand side of radius rod towards rear of car just enough to clear the spring, and then lift it as high as it will go. Tie with cord to frame so as to keep it out of the way when pulling axle backwards). Disconnect lower ends of rear springs. On Series 40 the attaching studs have right hand threads, but on Series 50-70, the attaching bolts have left hand threads. **** Watch for this! Mine were stripped by the last guy who couldn't tell left from right and so I had to replace them. I recommend that pulling the axle back is a two man job. One guy at the front to lift and wiggle drive shaft and the other guy operating a trolley jack placed under the differential to find the "sweet spot" where splines on drive shaft slide smoothly. The guy at the back then pulls on the jack to move assembly to the rear. As for the cause of your problem, I would tend to agree with 2carb40. Looking at a sectional diagram of the transmission, there is probably enough slack or play to where the forward pressure you exerted could have caused the inner section of the torque ball to distort the inner retainer enough to cause the leak. Like the other guys, I'll be interested to know how it goes. Peter
    1 point
  22. Kevin, What you have there looks pretty close. I,ll take a few measurements of mine tomorrow. The last pic of the seat riser, it is 3 3/4" and sits down into the rabbet in the side rails and the floor buts up to it, not it sitting on the floor. That way the metal tray can screw/nail onto the seat riser. The last photo is taken upside down. showing that it is deeper than the corner blocks
    1 point
  23. Sold! Looking back on this, it took longer than I thought. Went to a local guy, so I'll probably see it again. He's absolutely not painting it or swapping out the engine... But it might be lowered just a little in the rear... And get a dual exhaust...
    1 point
  24. My Wife and I had a great time, here are the pics she took at the show...................
    1 point
  25. For the underfloor Group 2-size compartment on my driver 1925 Pierce, I take up the space with four one-quart oil bottles (full) which have just the right amount of "give" and weight to hold them in place. Never used the oil but it's handy if someone else needs some... :-)
    1 point
  26. My friend has been into Nashes as long as I've known him, which is about 25 years. He also has a Canadian Statesman, I believe, along with a few others. He lives in the North Pickering area, so you may very well have met him at one time. Keith
    1 point
  27. Mine has been in place with a HD cable tie for about 3 years. I posted it elsewhere......needed something to cover that bright red plastic cover, I found a inexpensive trash can the proper size, cut it down to fit and cut some holes in the bottom for the battery terminals......see picture I thought about making a shallow aluminum tray but so far that has not happened
    1 point
  28. I might be incorrect, but it's been my belief that the residual pressure valve is IN the master cylinder. In the circa 1967 or so systems, when dual master cylinders became standard equipment, the "divider block" was just that and also had the switch to indicate when fluid was lost from one of the two brake fluid circuits. No more, no less. When disc brakes were used on the front, then it also took on the function of "pressure limiter" so that more pressure would go to the front discs (as they take higher fluid pressure to work!) and normal pressure to the rear drums . . . aka "proportioning valve"., plus the fluid loss switch. I fully understand the need for better braking power in your locale's general terrain. Although the brake type CAN influence stopping power and fade resistance, it's the FRICTION MATERIAL that ultimately affects braking performance AND fade resistance. The "given" in this equation is a properly-machined AND surface finished brake friction contact surface, even on drum brakes. I've never really understood "why", but GM vehicles from the '50s-'60s had a bad reputation for braking performance greatly diminishing when water got into the brakes themselves. Drive through a puddle and "no brakes" . . . that might be a little extreme, but you get the point. Fords and Chryslers didn't seem to have that problem, or at least as seriously as similar GM cars. Back then, drivers were cautioned that when their brakes got wet, to ride the brake a little to heat the drums and dry-out the linings . . . so that when they DID need the brakes, they'd be ready (rather than otherwise). Unfortunately, to me, your exercise seems to be a little convoluted with too many twists and turns. Sorry, just the way it seems to me. It seems to me that there are way too many brake systems you could look at the specs on and see some similarities to what's on your Buick. Like the relationship of master cylinder bore and wheel cylinder bore sizes, front and rear. For the drum systems. Then, take the same similar system and update that to when they went to disc brakes, too see how the various things changed. In this last comparison, it's somewhat important to look at only THOSE model years in particular. Reason that in the earlier 1980s, when fuel economy was becoming important, a newer-style caliper was developed to allow a decrease in the brake pad residual pressure, yet still have enough contact to keep the rotors dried-off in wet environments. This became known (at least in GM) as "Quick Take-up" and was on the first Chevy Citations, with other vehicles probably quietly upgrading to this design. Also, as brakes were downsized, the pad material became more "metallic" in nature, rather than the prior asbestos-based friction material. Metallic linings had been available for police use since the middle 1950s, but they generally took "heat" to work correctly. This meant they were NOT popular with drag racers who used their foot brakes to stage the vehicles on the staring line. The 1961 Chevy Impala SS came standard with them, but the drag racers soon put "normal" linings on their cars so they could stage the car at the staring line. On a road course, the metallic worked very well when "hot". The factory OEM linings from the middle 1970s were becoming more of a hybrid between the normal materials and metallic, aka "semi-metallic". Here's my theory. Find a vehicle of about the same weight as your Buick (possibly a '77 Buick LeSabre or similar GM car with disc/drums). Look at the diameter of the rear wheel cylinders and compare it to your Buick. Then, in something like the Scarebird list, see what front calipers are being used. Then look at the master cylinders and their specs. Another vehicle to compare the disc/drum to 4whl discs is the last-gen Buick Roadmaster sedans (with rear drums) and the similar Impalas (with 4 whl discs . . . in THREE brake option codes!). Look at how things did or did not change between the rr drums and rr disc vehicles, with respect to the master cylinders. In the case of the Impalas, the rear discs were attached via a bracket to the axle housing, rather than having specific rear axle housing (as the 1979 Firebird WS-6 cars). To me, keeping the master cylinders and calipers generally matched to a particular model year range would be key (considering your previous comments about fluid displacement). Bur once you can get a handle on these various relationships, THEN you can find one of the street rod brake system vendors that have a range of boosters and master cylinders available. Possibly www.rockauto.com can be a good research source, too. In this search, the issues of physical dimensions and other related issues can be further investigated. Sometime in the earlier 1970s, "the feds" put some limits upon just how much maximum pedal pressure was needed to stop a vehicle in an emergency situation. Seems like it's 40 lbs of foot pressure on the brake pedal? This meant changes in friction material composition (among other things). In those earlier factory power disc/drum brake systems, the vehicles came with a dual-diaphragm power brake booster. Generally, they were smaller in diameter but longer in length. This was for the added pressure which disc brakes needed to work. In later years, some changes were made and single-diaphragm boosters were used. When I go my new '77 Camaro, I was not impressed with its stopping power. Too much pedal travel, it seemed. Our shop foreman mentioned that non-power brake vehicles had one hole on the pedal for non-power brakes (more leverage) and one for use with power brakes (a little less leverage). What finally got the car to stop as it should was some COPO 9C-1 1977 Nova Police front brake pads. Later, I replaced the rear drums (9.5"x2") with 1981 Z-28 Export rear brakes (11"x2") (which were the same size as on the 1977 Monte Carlo and later '77+ Caprice police cars). That's how GM should have built it to start with! One other thing to consider is the respective size of the brake lines themselves, for the various applications. A small thing, but something which can affect the "fluid displacement" orientation. Personally, I like upgrades which are OEM-based as they strike me as being a little more robust in nature and design . . . if that matters. That link to the street rod brake cylinder/booster vendor is in one of my previous posts, I believe. In general, from what I've seen, the Scarebird parts lists are pretty decent. Some some finessing to find parts which will fit under the floorboard of your Buick can be, as y'all have discovered, a little challenging. Keep us posted, NTX5467
    1 point
  29. Ok, I hope you guys don't think that I'm just trying to fill up this thread, but I decided to turn those two pictures to B&W, and post them. I could of done some other stuff to artificially age them, but I like to make vintage images look as good as possible. This is what I used to do for a living not so long ago. Keith
    1 point
  30. The brake springs are different for the different sized drums. They have different formed angles to make them fit flush. Bob's Automobilia has both.
    1 point
  31. To wrap this post up, I'd like to thank the guys for their help and report that I finished the job last Friday (May 6). It took me about 6 hours, but then I guess I'm a little slower than most. I follow my late dad's instructions - read for an hour, think for an hour, work for 10 minutes. I found the most time-consuming and difficult part of the job was centering the torque ball while tightening the retainer bolts. I guess age has something to do with it; lying on a creeper working upside down with the frame about 4 inches above one's chest while wresting a sawn-off broom handle in one hand and a wrench in the other and trying to keep your glasses on can be a challenge! The satisfaction of knowing that the job is well done and there are NO leaks makes it all worthwhile. To say nothing of the $1,000 and change that I saved in labor by not taking it to my repair shop who priced me outta there! Once again, thanks for replies and messages. Peter
    1 point
  32. And that's just American. Then there's Canadian,Australian and British to just name three others that built custom bodies on Commercial Car chassis during the 20s,30s and 40s.
    1 point
  33. Gorgeous Ike. Reminded me of these two: July 13th, 2014, Rt 50 between Sacramento CA. and Lake Tahoe, NV.
    1 point
  34. Here are a few pictures that I took during our first stop on Sat's tour. The army truck pictured is one of 6 built by Chysler in 1969 for testing by the Canadian Army. It was not put into production due to some rather odd service issues, like to repair the brakes one needs to remove the engine first! It was designed to be completely amphibious as well. The trail bike is driven by the front wheel, as well as the rear one, so you could call it All Wheel Drive. Keith
    1 point
  35. He said he has been to your place and will say hi some time. He is a Lincoln guy and I have sent him info on a few that I have stumbled on as well as a few Mercs and he wouldn't turn his nose at a Cadillac. I think he should build a garage first. LOL
    1 point
  36. In future years these "self-appointed" car designers will be vilified for the mutilation of these original cars. It gives me great pleasure to see when a chopped and modified car brings 1/2 the value of an untouched original as the "re-builder" loses his financial ass. And its happening more and more all the time.
    1 point
  37. Here's another good one....
    1 point
  38. From June 2013, my 1957 Roadmaster Riviera on Skyline Drive in Shenandoah National Park.
    1 point
  39. Yesterday, Sat., we had the Electra out on another tour, this one a garage tour and drove it about 150+ miles through some very scenic countryside east of the city. The plan was to drive the '41 Roadmaster, as the Electra had a long tour the weekend before, but a leaky fuel line fitting put it out of action at the last minute. One gentleman we visited had an interesting collection of quite old cars. Two pre 1910 Caddillacs, one original, and not running, the other, an '06 currently under restoration. Plus a Maxwell, a Brush, too many Ford T's to count, and my favourite, a 1911 Buick Model 32. A small 2 seat roadster, which was in running and driving condition, with current Ontario license plates afixed to it. Also a bit of army stuff, a few radial aircraft engines, and some very old stationary engines. I took quite few pictures, plus a video of the '11 Buick running, which are still on my camera, and I will post later. We also visited a shop which converts car engines, usually LS1 or2 Corvette engines for aircraft use, then to another gentleman that has a collection of Edsels, and a few other Fords too. Keith
    1 point
  40. Have to agree on the wheel covers. Looks a whole lot better!
    1 point
  41. Yes, let's blame the glasses
    1 point
  42. That flat body against the wind will collapse on the frame and leave you a pile of kindling wood with a little metal mixed in. Even 50 MPH would be hard on the body. Definitely hire a professional with an enclosed trailer. The first two words out of the U-Haul guy will be "I thought". The wheels will just be incidental at that point. Bernie
    1 point
  43. Silly question, but have you tried inflating the tires? If they have gone down over 30 years, I'd venture to say that they would hold air for a 300 mile trip on a trailer. Bill McLaughlin
    1 point
  44. YES! Those red felloes and correct wheel covers look GREAT!
    1 point
  45. Old threads never die, they just slide on back with the calendar unless revived. Those who post, subscribe and guys like me still have the '60 Imperial Ghia limo. M'lady enjoys going to dinner in it.
    1 point
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