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Showing content with the highest reputation on 01/24/2016 in all areas

  1. 4 points
  2. This is a continuation of my Post #44 in the following link: http://forums.aaca.org/topic/266693-wheels/page-3 As promised, here are the eight visible differences…some obvious and others not so…that I spotted when I placed an OEM 1954 Buick Kelsey-Hayes (KH) 40-spoke, 6”-wide wire wheel next to a similar looking reproduction 40-spoke, 6”-wide wire wheel from Wheel Vintiques (WV): 1. RIM HOLE The diameter of the tire’s air valve stem hole is larger in the KH rim (.625” or 5/8”) than in the WV rim (.453” or 29/64”). The location is in the drop center well wall on both wheels and the valve stem points toward the center of the wheel (not upward). Older inner tubes usually have a larger diameter valve stem. When modern inner tubes that have the smaller diameter valve stem are installed in the OEM wheel with the larger sized hole, a rim hole reducer bushing is recommended to fill in the gap, prevent water infiltration, and to keep the smaller valve stem centered in the larger hole. 2. RIM CONTOUR The rim contour/bead profile, noted by a stamped letter that follows the stamped size of the wheel, designates that it meets certain dimensional criteria. The 1954 Buick KH wire wheel is stamped 15x6 L and 54 in the drop center near the valve stem hole and is not readable with a mounted tire. The WV wire wheel is stamped 15x6 J along with the Month, Day, and Year of Manufacture on the outer backside of the wheel and is more easily read with the tire/wheel removed from the brake drum. The KH wire wheel rim was designed for a bias-ply tire with an inner tube; it does not have the inner and outer safety beads. The WV rim has the safety beads and according to WV ads, allows running a tubeless tire without an inner tube. The safety bead depressions are noticeable about 1¼” in from the face of the rim’s flanges. When viewing the rim without a mounted tire, the safety bead humps are noticeable on the inner bead seat edges. Safety beads are designed to provide a better tire-to-wheel fit, prevent tire bead slippage toward the dropped center well, and prevent air leakage from the rim due to the horizontal forces applied to a tubeless tire during cornering. (Edit: see my sketch in Post #3 below.) 3. HUB BUBBLE BUMPS / INNER DEPRESSIONS The four 3/4"-diameter stamped bubbles located between adjacent lug bolt holes are more pronounced on the KH wheel hub than on the WV wheel hub. These depressions when viewed from the backside of the hub are necessary for front brake drum rivet and rear brake drum bolt head clearances. The fifth space between adjacent lug bolt holes is drilled the same on both wheels for a brake drum pilot stud (guide pin) that helps positioning a tire/wheel combination onto a brake drum. 4. HUB FLANGE The 9 7/8” overall diameter of the hub is the same on both wheels; however, the front to back dimension is deeper on a KH wheel hub (4 7/16” vs. 4 1/16”). This ±3/8” difference is due to a perimeter flange that projects further inward beyond all other adjacent wheel-to-brake drum mounting surfaces on a KH hub. You will run into an interference issue when trying to use this KH wire wheel on some later-year Buick finned-aluminum Fabricast brake drums. On the backside of a WV wheel hub where it mounts up against the brake drum, all surfaces are uniformly on the same vertical plane…no protruding projected flange. 5. HUB DRILLED HOLES On a WV hub, the twenty spoke holes for the inner (shorter) spokes are drilled closer to the face of the hub by ± 5/16”. 6. SPOKES On a KH wheel, ten of the inner (shorter) spokes are labeled K and ten are labeled L. The outer (longer) spokes are also labeled differently: five each are labeled G, H, I, and J. On a WV wheel, all twenty inner (shorter) spokes are labeled the same with a number 3; on the outer (longer) spokes, five are labeled FF/T and the other fifteen are not labeled. Differences in spoke identification could be due to bend angles or varying lengths. I did not disassemble the wheels to compare. 7. SPOKE FINISH OEM KH wire wheels came with chrome-plated carbon steel spokes. I ordered my WV wire wheels with the optional stronger polished stainless steel spokes that eliminated my hydrogen embrittlement concerns. I have heard that some wire wheel restoration shops do not offer nor will they install any type of chrome-plated spokes. 8. WHEEL LINER KH wheels came with 1½” wide, easily removable inner wheel flaps to prevent inner tube punctures from the spoke’s nipples. WV wheels have a layer of 1¾”- wide silicone sealant to prevent air pressure loss due to over-sized (?) drilled spoke holes. I will not even attempt to address any structural design or technical issues that might include questionable hub/rim metal gauges, drilled spoke-hole sizes, spoke gauges, spoke butt end gauges, rolled or cut spoke threads, chrome plating, workmanship, and overall quality. Al Malachowski BCA #8965 “500 Miles West of Flint”
    3 points
  3. I figured "Fireball" was just a nickname, like Olds "Rocket." But there is a reason for it. Copied this from the 1952 Service Manual page 2-10: "The piston head is specially shaped with a hump on one side and a rounded depression on the camshaft side. This unusual shape combined with the valve-in-head design forms a combustion chamber in which the fuel-air charge is compressed in the form of a flattened ball at the point of ignition. This "Fireball" design regulates the combustion of the fuel-air charge and smoothes out the power impulses."
    2 points
  4. Mike: Thanks for the comments. Comparing the weights, wheelbase dimensions, and track widths of the two different year Skylarks, you're only talking minimal pounds and inches differences. My guess would be that tire size was the main reason but I've never seen any other documentation if other reasons contributed to the change in the wire wheel width dimension. Jake: Also, thanks for the comments. I often questioned when Kelsey-Hayes quit manufacturing their 1953 and 1954 wire wheels and whether 1955 Buicks with the 8.00x15 tire got the wider 6 1/2" wire wheel. Proof might lie in what the size and year is stamped on a wire wheel that came rolling off the assembly line on a 1955 Buick. I've never seen a wire wheel stamped with a '55' designating 1955. Maybe somebody reading this post could chime in if they have or seen one. As far as WV not offering a reproduction 6 1/2"-wide wire wheel, my only guess would be that they might have not been aware of the two different widths. Certainly, it wouldn't take much to manufacture a rim 1/2" wider and change the fixture positioning a 1/4" for a CNC operation. The inner hubs are the same on either OEM Buick wire wheel width. Al Malachowski BCA #8965 "500 Miles West of Flint"
    2 points
  5. 2 points
  6. Good to hear money came your way ! My personal opinion is that I believe old cars are not a very good investment. Should you buy them to have fun, definitely yes! Should you buy them to make money, definitely no! JMO, Wayne
    2 points
  7. Hello all, my name is Miro and Im 21 . I did register here on this forum couse Im car fan since my childhood. And there is when it all starts. Im drawing the cars I would like to share my work with you. Im long time experienced car drawer, I learned It all by my self and discover some ways how to draw car very detailed and realistic. Im dreaming about to draw other car owners cars. I hope we have here some car lovers who appreciate good art work. Own original handmade drawing of your car or your dream car is a lot more valuable as just regular photo. If you display it upfront of your car on carshow, it will bring more and more people looking on your car hhhh it is amazing remembrance also! My drawings are all done with pencils only. Im attaching few of my last drawing I did in January so you can see how Im doing it. Please be aware I have watermark for protection in the middle of my drawings. Mustang 11x14 in 'Cuda 71 A4 8,26 x 11,61 in. 'Cuda 73 A4 8,26 x 11,61 in. Superbird A4 8,26 x 11,61 in.
    1 point
  8. So, earlier this evening I was preparing to send a letter to my state legislators to grumble about the ethanol fuel mandate here in Pennsylvania. Turns out that a bill has already passed the house to eliminate the mandate, and is now is Senate Committee. Here is a notice from SEMA followed by the letter I sent to my own representative and each of the committee members. I would certainly encourage any PA based AACA members to do the same ... =========================== URGENT LEGISLATIVE ALERT (UPDATE) Pennsylvania Bill to Eliminate Ethanol Requirement in Gasoline Approved by House; Moves to Senate Legislation (H.B. 471) to remove the requirement that gasoline offered for sale in the state contain a percentage of ethanol was approved by an overwhelming margin in the House of Representatives and will now be sent to the Senate Environmental Resources & Energy Committee for consideration. Currently, the state requires that “All gasoline sold or offered for sale to ultimate consumers in this Commonwealth must contain at least 10% cellulosic ethanol by volume . . .” . Please Contact All Members of the Pennsylvania Senate Environmental Resources & Energy Committee (List Below) Immediately to Request Support for H.B. 471 H.B. 471 recognizes that ethanol fuels cause problems with fuel pumps, fuel gauges, as well as other engine performance issues, especially over a period of time when the vehicle is not used. Current high performance specialty parts along with pre-model year 2001 cars and parts may be most susceptible to corrosion. H.B. 471 acknowledges that ethanol has been shown to decrease fuel mileage. H.B. 471 recognizes that the life span of vehicles and equipment can be dramatically reduced with the wrong fuel and that owners could be confronted with break downs. Anti-corrosion additives are available for each purchase of gasoline but can become expensive, burdensome and require consumer education. DON’T DELAY! Please contact all Senate Environmental Resources & Energy Committee members to request support for H.B. 471. Please e-mail a copy of your letter to Steve McDonald at stevem@sema.org. Also, please forward this Alert to your fellow car enthusiasts. Urge them to join the SAN and help defend the hobby! Thank you for your assistance. Pennsylvania Senate Environmental Resources & Energy Committee Senator Gene Yaw - Majority Chairman Phone: (717) 787-3280 Email: eyaw@pasen.gov Senator John Yudichak - Minority Chairman Phone: (717) 787-7105 Email: yudichak@pasenate.com Senator Camera Bartolotta Phone: (717) 787-1463 Email: bartolatta@pasen.gov Senator Joseph Scarnati III Phone: (717) 787-7084 Email: jscarnati@pasen.gov Senator Elder Vogel Jr. Phone: (717) 787-3076 Email: evogel@pasen.gov Senator Kim Ward Phone: (717) 787-6063 Email: kward@pasen.gov Senator Donald White Phone: (717) 787-8724 Email: dwhite@pasen.gov Senator John Blake Phone: (717) 787-6481 Email: senatorblake@pasenate.com Senator Andrew Dinniman Phone: (717) 787-5544 Email: adinniman@pasenate.com Senator Daylin Leach Phone: (717) 787-5544 Email: dleach@pasenate.com Senator Scott Hutchison Phone: (717) 787-9684 Email: shutchison@pasen.gov ========================== The Honorable Senator John Refferty Harrisburg, PA 22 January 2016 Dear Senator Rafferty, I am writing you to request your support for House Bill 471 which removes the ethanol mandate for gasoline. I realize that this bill is currently in review by the Senate Environmental Resources & Energy Committee, I have already contacted all members of that committee via email. As an owner of several antique and classic vehicles, I have experienced first hand the damages resulting from ethanol blend fuels. Fuel pumps, carburetors, sending units, and most recently a fuel tank have all been severely damaged or destroyed resulting in thousands of dollars in unnecessary repairs. To preserve some equipment, I now travel over 100 miles twice a year to fill fuel cans with ethanol free gasoline. Of even greater significance are the ethical implications of turning food into fuel. Studies have shown that the claimed environmental benefits are based on unrealistic crop yields and thus, the environmental impact of producing ethanol actually exceeds the benefit. Clearly the introduction of ethanol into fuel was not based on good science but was designed to placate the farm lobby at the expense of the public. I appreciate your help and ask that you support the passage of HB 471. Thank you for your time and considering my request. Sincerely,
    1 point
  9. IT DEPENDS ON THE POT METAL!!!!! We have straightened hundreds of carburetor castings MADE AFTER WW-II by using heat, pressure, and PATIENCE!!!!! The method we have used very successfully: (1) Cut a piece of 1/4 inch steel to fit against the warped surface. (2) Drill holes in the steel to line up with the mounting holes in the item being straightened. (3) Mount the casting to the steel piece with just enough tension so it does not move. (4) MEASURE THE AMOUNT OF WARPAGE! (5) Measure the warpage again, just to be certain! (6) using the screws, C-clamps, whatever, clamp out 0.003 inch of the warpage (7) Place casting, plate, clamps, the whole thing in an ELECTRIC oven, and heat to 400 degrees F. (8) Turn off the oven, and allow the item to cool in the oven until at room temperature - don't hurry the process. (9) Remove from the oven (if you used clamps, they will probably fall off). (10) Repeat steps 4 through 9 as many times as necessary. I have straightened castings with more than 0.100 inch successfully using this method, sometimes heating 25~40 times. The mix of pot metal began changing significantly in the 1930's. I have had zero success on pre-1935 castings, and limited success on 1936 up to 1942 castings. DON'T EVEN THINK OF TRYING THIS ON PRE-1935 POT METAL, SOME OF IT WILL ACTUALLY EXPLODE LIKE A HAND GRENADE! By the way, that ABD you have is an excellent carb, for a two-barrel; but that is a large engine for a two-barrel. And even though the method has worked for me for maybe 30 years, try it on a junk piece of pot metal to prove it to yourself. Over the years, we have experimented on lots of junk to learn things. Some of what we learned wasn't what we wanted to learn (see the second paragraph above!); but we did learn. Knowledge gained through experience is normally useful! Jon.
    1 point
  10. Although the "use thinned epoxy primer as a sealer" might work per se, there are dedicated products to do that. I understand that when a sealer product is used, it effectively puts a barrier between the lower coats and the top coat to prevent later issues with "what's down there" bleeding through to the top coat. Be that as it may. Acrylic lacquer was GM's paint system of choice before the BC/CC systems came around. It, like the similar acrylic enamel, had it's own sheen or "look" to it, just as the newer BC/CC systems look much glossier. Lacquer was also the refinish system of choice for many body shops due to the fact it could be sanded and re-coated to remove any "trash" which might have settled on the drying paint. Lacquer dries from the bottom up, as enamels dry from the top down. Lacquers are more forgiving of "dirtier" spraying environments than enamels are. NOT to forget about the issues of "atmospheric silicones"! Some shops, back then, sought to shoot the acrylic lacquer "dry" (to help prevent the "dust issue" from being an issue), then trying to color sand and buff to a higher gloss, but if it was shot too dry, the paint was a little too dry when it hit the surface, and was grainy and would not buff smooth, although it did have something of a shine and color match. Enjoy! NTX5467
    1 point
  11. Before you repaint it, since you are in FL, put it out in the sun and let it get hot on a dry day of course. I had this same problem with a 38 Cadillac I had. I covered it overnight with a brand new good outdoor fitted car cover, because I couldn't store it in a Garage at my Girlfriend's Apt and I always thought it was neat to take an old car out on our dates, anyways, when I uncovered it the next morning having had a little rain over night, I found the same thing you did. After I had it out in the sun for the day, they disappeared. I never had them come back either. Of course I never left it out or let it get wet under a cover again. I would not repaint the hood period if it's original paint unless the paint came off.
    1 point
  12. Forgive me for taking liberty with the intent of this posting. But I've shared below some changes I'd wished the Buick engineers and designers had made when the first generation Riviera was introduced. I can think of many, but here's a dozen items I'd wish for if I was buying a new car back then (in no particular order)... 1.) leather seat option on '64 and '65 2.) 425 cu. in engine standard in '63 and '65 3.) three speed automatic standard in all three years 4.) a four speed manual transmission option 5.) move the front seat positions back 3 - 4" 6.) double hinge the center console glove box door, so it lays flat 7.) an antenna that goes all the way down, flush with the fender top 8.) a gas tank fill that isn't so difficult to reach or stick a modern nozzle into 9.) a more robust or reinforced glove box door latch 10.) dash gauges, rather then idiot lights 11.) a more easily serviceable heater core 12.) a '65 nose with a '63 '64 sides and rear. I've made some of these modifications to my '64 Riviera.
    1 point
  13. Whats a TV Tuner ?? Is it the little kid that you would have get up and change the channel for you ? Why did you need one with only 3 networks ?
    1 point
  14. '39 was the first year of column change. Not 100% sure but pre '39 Buick, Olds, Cad and/or La Salle shifter may bolt on to the 5 bolt case. Have seen a photo of a '39 with a floor change. Used La Salle parts, Pre war Buick forum http://forums.aaca.org/forum/60-buick-pre-war/ As a '39 Buick owner you can join the '39 Buick Team And we like photo's
    1 point
  15. I can tell you where he is. He is very busy!! He has gone back to school at the local college and also picked up a part time job to pay for school. He has been so busy that I have only talked to him once since Christmas. He has also been trying to get some work in on the Kaiser and Buick.
    1 point
  16. Just call it a barn find and it will double or more in value! Terry
    1 point
  17. Ted is probably right about "say no to lacquer primer"...otherwise it might turn out to look like this .
    1 point
  18. Here is one that sat in a garage for 40 years until I got it out and home.
    1 point
  19. I am not a professional, but I do know that the local body shop will use different products and procedures than the hobbyist or the restorer does. I use PPG DPLF epoxy primer over bare metal. PROS: It sprays real easy. It is an excellent rust inhibitor and it does not have to be top coated for long term protection. You can also use the same product as a sealer by adding thinner. (No additional products to buy for sealer) It also comes in different colors if you are using it as a sealer. CONS: It is expensive. You have to use what you mix. You must scuff and re-coat before any additional top coats if it sits more than a week. I am sure there are less expensive products out there that are similar, but PPG is sold locally. You must have good ventilation and good quality mask or fresh air system. (If you can smell the paint through the mask it is not working) Mud
    1 point
  20. Does anyone have a front grill from a 1935 Dictator for sale? Ken, Deltaville Va
    1 point
  21. TA Performance is the first listing on the google search that I proposed. You can find a ton of parts there plus other similar questions and responses.
    1 point
  22. Jack, If all else fails go to "logic". The most successful V-8 in automotive history, with a life span of almost five decades, designed by a company in it's death throws? (No insult intended to earlier Studes). The design of this engine was so ground breaking at that time that it could have cemented Studebaker's future if they had come up with it. I think your knowledgeable friend missed the boat on this one. Greg
    1 point
  23. Here is a rare Kaiser Darrin with a hard top. Not a barn find, but an old garage find. THIS PHOTO IS FROM A FACEBOOK PAGE "KAISER DARRIN ENTHUSIAST", MANAGED BY TERRY TRASATTI WHO IS THE EDITOR AND MANAGER OF THE KAISER DARRIN NEWSLETTER AND REGISTRY FOR THE KAISER FRAZER OWNERS CLUB. HE DEALS WITH OWNERS OF KAISER DARRINS ALL OVER THE WORLD.
    1 point
  24. I have three that fit that description. What is your budget? Wayne
    1 point
  25. I will go beyond quite good to very good! The best I have seen on this or any other site. Wayne
    1 point
  26. I have never gotten used to the dimmer switch mounted on the turn signal. And now that I'm getting older I tend to drive with my low beams on. It's hell getting my left foot up to that lever these days! Bernie
    1 point
  27. You seem to have learned pretty good English as well as your drawing ability.
    1 point
  28. A 1985 2 door Park Ave is worth a look-see, but, my understanding is that 85 Park Aves (first year with front wheel drive) have had a lot of technical issues. One might think after all this time they are worked out, if the car is still in use.
    1 point
  29. Registration Update - January 17, 2016 Attendees 664 Buicks 326 BCA Banquet 429 BHA Banquet 219
    1 point
  30. Some on here can barely say that about the wheel.
    1 point
  31. Hello. I just wanted to make a quick post here about Ebay scams. I am an auto transporter broker and I run accross this alot. I ship alot of cars of Ebay and want to warn people to always pay thru Ebay and not to pay the seller direct. I post this as a public service because I am really sad for alot of my customers who have purchased cars off Ebay and have been scammed. I am one of the few people who give automated quotes on Ebay. If you buy a car off Ebay chances are you will end up with a quote from my company Enterprise Auto Transport. Once people buy their car many people go thru an auto transport company to ship their car. The first question I always ask the shipper is is the car running. 4/10 we go to pick up cars off Ebay and the car is listed as running and its not. Just recently we went to pick up a cadillac in New Jersey. The shipper told us the car runs and drivers perfect. When the driver arrived the car would not go forward. It only went into reverse. It barely even had enough power to make it up the carrier as their is a bit of a lift. We were lucky the car could even get on the truck. Sometimes these cars do not run and the drivers will get out there to pick up the car and if he does not have a wench he cant pick up the car and is out time and money so now there are two victims the buyer and the driver. I cant tell you how many times buyer protection has saved a sellers but when hes been scammed. In the case with the cadillac he was able to file a dispute and recoop his fees. Many times i have delivered vehicles only to turn around to pick them right back up and bring them to the auction. The reasons vary but they are for things like the odometer not being what they said, the car is not runing or the vehicle is damaged. The selllers always take the best pics of the car. Often times they will try to pin damage on the drivers but drivers fill out a bill of lading and mark the damage on the car at pick up. When the driver arrives with the damaged car the first inclination is to blame the driver. The bill of lading has saved many a driver but also saved the customer. The moral of this whole story is be careful. Really look at ratings on Ebay but that is not enough. Go thru Ebay. If the seller complains he does not want to go thru Paypal because the fees are too high perhaps you should ask for more photos or call a company to go inspect the vehicle for you. There are many places online that do that. I hope this helps you all.
    1 point
  32. If I was judging chassis’ in BCA’s 400-point Class G, 1953-1954 Skylarks competition, my answer would be… Addressing both the wire wheel and the tire at the same time, I would not deduct any points from the 1953 Skylark with the five OEM Kelsey-Hayes (KH) 40-spoke, 6 1/2"-wide wire wheels provided that the bias-ply tires are the correct size (8.00x15) and inner tubes are installed, but I would deduct points from the 1953 Skylark with the five repop Wheel Vintiques (WV) 40-spoke, 6”-wide wire wheels with the same size, tube or tubeless type tire, due to the non-authentic wheel width size and running the same size tire on the narrower repop wheel. However, if I was judging two 1954 Buick Skylarks, one with five OEM KH 6"-wide wire wheels with the correct size (7.60x15) bias-ply tires with inner tubes and the other with five WV repop 6"-wide wire wheels with the same size tube-type or tubeless tire, I would not deduct points from either Skylark because IMHO the repop WV wire wheel is close enough in appearance to the OEM KH wire wheel even though I counted seven (7) visible differences when I placed one of each wheel side by side without a mounted tire. My list of differences exclude the OEM chrome plated carbon steel spokes vs. the polished stainless steel spokes available on the repop WV wire wheels. I ran across a similar situation while judging at a BCA Nationals a few years ago. All I’m going to say is that…I was reminded that we are not here to kill the car….the HJ requested that I send him some information on what I was talking about and he would read it over, and…..the owner drove away in his questionable paint color 1953 Buick Skylark equipped with repop wire wheels and the wrong color trophy. Written information on OEM Buick Skylark and repop WV wire wheels is almost non-existent. There are way too many uninformed car owners, buy them and drive them wire wheel owners, judges, editors, and Forum posters that are unaware of just the basics: how to measure a wheel width, number of spokes, how many wheels to a complete set, what years and models got what size, what years and models wire wheels were not offered on, etc.; let alone getting into the technical stuff and all the differences. They are not alone. Check out this Coker Tire link (Coker owns WV) and note the number of spokes the ad mentions: https://www.cokertire.com/wheels/wire-wheels/buick-skylark-wheel.html Here are a few more items to back-up my reasoning: 1. Talking about incorrect information, check out the current 2005 BCA Judging Handbook (page 32) and a 1928-1954 BUICK MASTER CHASSIS PARTS BOOK (Group 5.803, Part Number 1165713). They both incorrectly state that 1953 Skylarks take a 15x6 wire wheel. Unfortunately, that is what the uninformed might be hanging their hat on as being 100% correct. 2. The 1953 Buick Skylark Model 76X was the only Year and Model that came from the factory equipped with 40-spoke 15x6.5 KH wire wheels. The wheels are stamped 15x 6 1/2 L and 53 on the drop center well near the valve stem hole. OEM wire wheels for 1954 Skylarks are stamped 15x6 L and 54. If you’ve ever wondered about what the “L” stands for, it is called the Rim Contour designation that meets certain dimensional criteria. 3. Unless the car owner can prove otherwise, all WV repop 40-spoke wire wheels that I have, have seen, have seen advertised, and read about, are 15x6 wheels. 4. BCA judging is based on authenticity, condition, and workmanship. A 1954 OEM Buick KH or a repop WV 6"-wide wire wheel on a 1953 Buick Skylark is not authentic. Why did Buick engineers specify a wider wheel for the 1953 Skylark with the larger tire and then downsizing it for the 1954 Skylark with a smaller tire? Final comments related to this topic: ■ When you purchased a new 1953-1954 Skylark or paid for the wire wheel option on other 1954-1955 Buick Models (if offered), you received 5 wire wheels + 5 hub caps + 5 appropriate hub cap emblems…not 4 of each. ■ The price differential between restoring an OEM wire wheel and purchasing a new WV repop wire wheel with polished stainless steel spokes is minimal, if any. If you have a good core (rim + hub…throw away the old spokes and nipples and buy new ones), this month’s price from a major restoration shop is running around $650-$700 per wheel. If you don’t have a restorable core, they are still available for around $300 each. Add the two numbers together and you have around $1,000 in each wheel. If you checked out the WV wire wheel prices lately, they are running very close to that number, if and when they are available. ■ Personally, I would not put a wire wheel with chrome plated spokes on any of my cars. When restoring an OEM wire wheel or considering purchasing a WV repop, buy the stronger polished stainless steel spokes. Google hydrogen embrittlement for why I am saying this. ■ The BCA Judging Handbook (page 29) states that...wire wheels must, of course, use (inner) tubes... IMHO, that statement doesn’t go far enough and should be reworded to say something similar to this: All cars running any type of tire, bias ply or radial without an inner tube, on any wire wheel or steel disc wheel that is not designed for a tubeless tire, should not be allowed to compete in any type of BCA judging competition. The 1953-1954 Buick OEM wire wheels (plus zillions of pre mid-1950s steel wheels) were not designed for tubeless tires. They do not have the safety beads and they are most likely illegal to run them without an inner tube in your state or country. I suggest you have a talk with your insurance agent to see if you’re covered or local law enforcement department if you have any doubts. Read the fine print for disclaimers, restrictions, and liability issues when you purchase wheels or tires; nobody likes surprises. The WV wire wheel repops do have the safety bead humps that are designed to (i) achieve a better tire fit; (ii) prevent tire slide from the bead seat; and (iii) prevent loss of air pressure from horizontal forces to the tire’s sidewall when cornering. You do not want to be involved or liable for a serious or fatal mishap due to running tubeless tires on a wheel that wasn’t designed for tubeless tires. I guarantee it. Check out the following link if you are interested in reading about all the differences between the OEM 1953-1954 Buick Skylark KH vs. the WV repop wire wheel: http://forums.aaca.org/topic/268491-oem-1954-buick-kelsey-hayes-wire-wheel-vs-wheel-vintiques-repro/ Al Malachowski BCA #8965 "500 Miles West of Flint" Edit: added link
    1 point
  33. 7 warehouses, 4 restoration shops, more than 100 cars. Now that's passion! We are a lucky Club to be invited to share this mans vision.
    1 point
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