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  1. 30 points
    Received latest issue of Hemmings Motor News yesterday. You know, the bible of the old car hobby, the source for cars and parts that we've used for years. I first started subscribing in 1965, and never missed a year. So, last month they ran an editorial that discussed, among other things, the death of the old car hobby, in regard to pre-war cars. That's pre-World War II, for you young'uns. Oh wait, there are no young people interested in those cars, according to some. From the letters section, two things, both from same letter, and Sir, if you read this forum, no apologies, I think you're wrong: 1-"....all the old folks who owned or enjoyed the hobby of the 1910-1950 era cars are dying off or too old to enjoy them anymore, and want to sell them. Who is going to buy these cars that are out there?" Now, in the same issue, in the auction reports: 1910 Cadillac - sold, $104,500 1904 Premier - sold, $341,000 1909 Thomas - not sold, not meeting reserve, $580,000 1929 Packard 645 phaeton - sold, $319,000 1923 Pierce sedan - sold, $107,800 No one wants them? Really? It's not that NO ONE wants them, it's that SOME PEOPLE don't want them, and they thus assume NO ONE wants them. Their thinking is "I don't like to eat broccoli, so I don't think anyone likes to eat broccoli". This is flawed logic. Sure, there are older guys collecting cars, but there are also younger guys coming along who have money and like the old cars. Maybe not as many as it used to be, but it sure seems to be enough, otherwise prices on good cars would be dropping drastically. I keep hearing gloom and doom, and "I'm going to wait a few years and buy those cars for pennies on the dollar", but it sure doesn't seem to be coming true. The market segment that IS dropping in price/value is the project car area. The cost of restoration these days is so high that projects just won't bring good money. 2: ".....don't like how they [old cars] drive. Try driving a 1930 Model A on a trip. No seat belts, hard to start, drives like a truck, and you better know how to double clutch those old cars....not really fun to drive" Seriously? He states he "sold his Model A", well, sure, I would have sold a worn out, neglected, poor condition Model A too. Instead of fixing the car, he assumes, as many do, that ALL Model A's, oh wait, let's include ALL pre war cars, are horrible driving vehicles. Astounding. The burgers down at my local diner are awful, thus all burgers everywhere must be awful. You guys out there that get it, know how well nicely a maintained or nicely restored car early car drives. You guys who don't get it, that's fine, just don't eat any burgers, cause if you did find and eat a good burger, then you'd have to change your mind. Changing minds is very difficult these days. My rant for the day.....
  2. 25 points
    Dear friends, Yesterday I submitted my request to Steve Moskowitz and Peter Gariepy to remove my status of BCA Forum Moderator and thanked them for the privilege of doing it for the last ten or so years. I have not received a reply, but feel it important to go ahead and announce it so that a new moderator can be selected/appointed. For a couple of years now I have not spent much time with my cars and tried to make up for that by starting the My Buick Sales and Service garage thread but now I'm not even able to spend time with that. I think it is important that a moderator be more into the subject for which they moderate than I currently am. Additionally my wife and I plan to start traveling a good bit in our newly acquired Airstream and will at times be boondocking off grid where there might not be internet service for several days at a time, therefore creating days of dead space in regards to effectively moderating the forum. Sadly there are other circumstances going on behind the scenes here that also helped with my decision but I will spare you those explanations here. Do know though that it has nothing to do with the current club political controversy, I never back down from a fight. I want to thank every one of you for your support over the last 10 or so years. I have worked to try and build the forum with interesting thread subjects, subforums etc in an effort to maintain interest and keep the forum alive and dynamic. I have tried my damnedest to be as honest, upfront and fair with any editing or removing of posts that I thought improper or hurtful to persons or the forum as a whole. No doubt I got some wrong and I am sorry if so. But God, hasn't it been fun!!!! Watching the builds of cars from rusty shells and of garages from cut up power poles and scrap steel. Following road warriors on their annual trips cross country to Buick meets and the fun and camaraderie they had when there. Hearing happy stories of new Buick purchases and sad ones of when they were lost in a wreck. Believe me when you peruse these accounts and posts thoroughly EVERYDAY, they and the people behind them become a part of your life. And a part I would never want to forget. Not sure how the process of bringing in a new moderator will go but I know there are some good prospects out there, very qualified folks who will be up to the challenge. So anyhow, tha's it my friends. Love ya all, every effin one a ya. Buickly, MrEarl cc @Steve Moskowitz @Peter Gariepy
  3. 25 points
    Discussions of BCA Club Business/Politics Folks, we have come to a 3 pronged fork in the ol’ Buick Highway in relation to the discussion of BCA Club Business and Politics. One would have had to have been hiding under a rock if they are not aware of the disruption and disturbance that a recent thread brought to our generally peaceful and friendly forum. I have always tried to allow discussions to ebb and flow unchallenged and unimpeded but feel that I may have been negligent in intervening in a few in the past. I would first like to say that contrary to some of yall’s perceptions that I have been biased and one-sided in my efforts to moderate some threads, I ask that you please believe me when I say I have tried my best not to be and to please put aside those perceptions and allow me the opportunity to try and move us out of the ugly quagmire that we are in. Back to the forks in the Buick Highway. The fork on the left is the fork we seem to be headed toward. It is full of potholes and dead man curves filled with more fomenting, stir the pot posts, back and forth bickering, hurt feelings, lost friendships and lost members. The center fork is one of a positive environment, civility, continued old friendships, helping one another with their cars and the making of new friends and very importantly, new members. It is a multi-lane road that all drivers, pre-war, post-war, modifieds, performance, Riviera’s, Reatta’s, and Opels can drive down at their own speed. It looks to be nicely paved with beautiful scenery, rolling hills and gentle curves. The fork on the right is one that I don’t think anyone would want to be forced down. It is filled with total censorship of any Club Business/Politics discussion and would involve potential loss of communication and informative discussions that are vital to our Clubs health and growth, and ends with us falling into a giant sink hole. SO folks, I have chosen to take the center fork and I hope you will all join me as we head down it. But take notice, I see quite a few regulatory signs down that peaceful roadway we will have to abide by if we are going to enjoy the ride. Those signs include No Nonfactual or Knowingly False or Inaccurate Comments, No Speculative or Conjectural Discussions aimed at stirring the pot, No Tempestuous Arguments, No Political Grandstanding (save it for the Bugle BOD candidate issue), No Personal Attacks, No Defamatory or Slanderous Assertions, No Provoking/Abusive Language, No Threatening, Harassing or Hateful comments. And be aware, enforcement will be stricter and those unwilling to comply with those posted signs or those who post discussions that a moderator considers as to having disturbed the order, dignity and harmony of this forum may find those posts removed and themselves left behind and standing on the side of the road. Nothing really new here, just some clarification of what you agreed to when you signed up here that I hope will make more clear the guidelines I will be using to keep the Buick Highway a more friendlier and peaceful highway. Drive safely my friends.
  4. 24 points
    Well, after 21 years with the same company helping to recruit and hire healthcare professionals, I've officially RETIRED! Of course I've done it before when I retired after 23 years in the U.S. Navy, but this time I'm not wondering what my second career will be- it's already happened, and it certainly was enjoyable and so satisfying. To think the people we hired made such a difference in peoples lives is awesome. Proud also of the projects I initiated to hire our veterans. Those talented hospital corpsmen and medics can do so much more than what is normally allowed in the civilian world, and now we're successfully breaking down barriers for them and putting their experience and skills to work in the right place. Friday was officially my last day at work, although I'll go back later this week for my retirement luncheon and to pick up a few things still in the office. I woke up this morning without an alarm clock, didn't have to fight traffic, and spent the day leisurely sorting and packing for Hershey. Best part of this is I won't need to work by axx off so I can go, ain't worried about what's going on while I'm gone, and won't have to unscramble some crisis when I get back. Sweeeeeeettttttt! So-if I walk by at Hershey with a kinda frozen smile on my face just figure I'm having a really great time! Terry
  5. 24 points
    I'd like to just take a moment, and thank the AACA (and the moderators!) for providing this great forum, and to all the Forum members who share their thoughts and knowledge. It's a lot of fun, both entertaining and educational, and we should all be very thankful it exists. I've really enjoyed it, as it helps me stay in touch with people now that I'm retired. You read a lot of articles about having enough money for retirement, but rarely is mentioned the fact that when you leave a business or profession, you also leave behind a lot of contacts and "business friends". So why this sudden outpouring of thanks? Why, it's my 7000th post on the forum, and I wanted it to be a little bit special! Thanks to all .............David Coco Winchester Va.
  6. 23 points
    Please allow an old man to brag a bit. After 37 years of restoring professionally the business was turned over to my 35 year old Son Devon two years ago. I still come in every day and do a bit of upholstery and woodwork but for the most part I just get in the way. At last week's Hershey we showed a 1960 Eldorado Biarritz which was the first full restoration run completely by my Son from start to finish. Happily it was well received and garnered a First Junior Award. I can now rest easy knowing the business is in good hands
  7. 22 points
    "With that in mind, can anyone summarize--perhaps without using names--what, exactly is going on? Can both sides be explained in a cool, calm way so that someone like me (and I presume a great majority of the BCA membership) can sort of understand what's going on?" Since I am a writer, I will try to summarize: I think the bad feelings began when the Driven Class (not judged to high standards, but a little more than just "display-only) cars were relegated to a remote parking lot that was walled off from the rest of the meet by a high fence at the South Bend, IN. national meet. This led to a feeling among Driven Class and non-judged car owners that they were being treated as unwanted step-children compared to the cars being judged in the 400-point classes. The awards banquet at the end of each national meet tends to reinforce that perception, with most of its emphasis being on trophies and awards. Pre-War cars, being harder to get parts for and tougher to keep in an original state--especially if you want to drive them on today's roads--tend to congregate in the Driven Class, the Modified Class, or the Display-only class, unless the owner is well-heeled enough to do a total restoration and bring the car to the meet in an enclosed trailer. There are exceptions, but that's the norm. The bad feelings got worse when in subsequent national meets the Pre-War (and other) cars were separated from each other depending on what they had signed up for (400-point; Archival; Display-only; Modified, or Driven Class), and at some meets there were assigned parking spaces for the entire meet, based on what type of judging or non-judging the car's owner had signed up for. In the meantime, people got elected to the BCA Board who were and are quite stratified in the types of Buicks they focus on. We have some Board members who are only interested in Pre-WWII cars, and have little knowledge or interest in newer Buicks. Likewise, we have some Board members who are only interested in the later model Buicks and have little knowledge or interest in the older ones. This deepens the divide. Add to that, a lack of financial reporting to the membership of the club for nearly three years, following the sudden death of our long-time club accountant, Joel Gauthier, and suspicions tend to build up about what is going on with the club's finances. This has recently been rectified, with the publication a few months ago of an annual financial report in the magazine, but it took nearly three years to do so and a lot of reputational damage was done in the meantime. In addition, an outside auditing firm has recently been hired, after a Board member made an issue out of the lack of audits and adequate financial reports for many years and the club's build-up of a large financial reserve, which, (from my perhaps uninformed point of view), the reasons for and size of the reserve were not adequately communicated to new Board members as they came onboard. When the reserve reached or got close to $700,000, one alarmed Board member reported the club to the IRS, out of fear that it would lose its non-profit status, and when he could not get a majority of the Board to acquiesce to his concerns. He also alleged wrong-doing by some, but that has not been proven and should not be brought up unless or until it is proven, and I doubt that it will be. Carelessness--maybe. Evil or bad intent--I sincerely doubt it. This has made the divisions and bad feelings even worse. At about the same time, the BCA Board majority removed the Director of the BCA's Pre-War Division due to concerns that the division's membership records were not being tracked and newsletters were not being distributed with regularity. The majority of the Board then took the step of appointing another Pre-War Division Director, and this person at about the same time attacked the Board member who reported the club to the IRS, with a petition for his removal from the club. At the same time, the Pre-War Division held their own election and elected another member as their Director. So, now you had two competing directors for the same Division--one with a lot of "baggage" due to his very public attack on the Board member at a national meet and not having been elected by anybody other than the Board majority, and the other duly elected but by a somewhat questionable list of Pre-War Division members. This brings us down to the current BCA Board election situation, in which there is a definite "us versus them" group, as well as a couple of unaffiliated or perhaps uninformed Board candidates in the current group of eight candidates. Much like the national Republicans versus Democrats, each camp is making claims about the other that are probably more extreme than reality. For example, the establishment group (for lack of a better term) is not against Pre-War cars or non-judged cars as the challengers might have you believe; and the challengers (for lack of a better term) do not want to eliminate BCA judging (as the establishment group would have you believe), they just feel there is too much emphasis on it. So, that's where we are, and I will probably be attacked by one group or the other for what I have written above--so be it. I'm a 40-year BCA member who has had a lot of involvement with the club and that's my perspective, as fairly as I can write it. Pete Phillips, BCA #7338
  8. 20 points
    While taking time at lunch to watch a celebration of the work and life of Martin Luther King Jr., I couldn't help but think that as old car lovers we often find ourselves reminiscing or fantasizing (for those younger members) about a time gone by. Let's not forget about the trials and struggles that got us where we are today. Let's not forget, the past is different for everyone, we all have a different journey, some not so rosey. I for one appreciate the style and simplicity of the past, however I would never live there. Appreciate the treasures we care for from the times gone by, but also appreciate the forward movement of the human story. Remember that we are all 99.999% genetically identical and appreciate the differences in your neighbors, friends, coworkers.....Do something good!
  9. 20 points
    If you're a white guy older than 50 and still sporting dreadlocks, you have made a very wrong turn in your life somewhere.
  10. 20 points
    This past Friday I boarded an American Airlines plane for DFW connecting to Calgary, final destination Kelwona, BC. As is obvious from my handle I have a 1938 Buick Roadmaster Model 80C the convertible Sedan (of Phaeton as Buick referred to it) . What you may not know is that my father has 1938 Roadmasters as well. A Model 81 (Trunk back sedan) and a Model 81F (Formal sedan with divider window and the rarest of the 4 Roadmaster models produced). So that's 3 of the 4 '38 Roadmaster Model...The 4th is a Model 87, the sport sedan AKA a slant back sedan. Buick made 466 Model 87's in 1938 exporting ZERO. In approximately 15 years of looking I have come across 6 left know to exist. Some of you may be aware that you can save a search within Google and Google will email you if it finds new web pages with your search result. I have several setup searching for various Buick related rarities. In July of this year I got a result back on my Model 87 search, A model 87 for sale on Kijiji. The link was no longer valid but through google search results I determined that the car for sale was the same one I had documented for sale in 2011 and determined the phone number in the current ad ( no longer able to be viewed except in the search results) was the same as the one i had saved in 2011. A call to the owner and the car was indeed still for sale but the owner had gone on extended holiday and would not return until mid Sept. Side bar: My father at age 38 bought what is now my 80C...the original NYC sold car had made its way to North Bay, Ontario, Canada. My own 38th birthday passed and though I didn't forget about the car it was on the back burner of my mind until while coaching my son's soccer game I got a call and a VM. Long story short pictures were sent and agreement in principle made and the process of importing this car back into the US begun. History: The seller has owned the car for half his life and half the car's life ...39 years...he acquired the car in Guam. Apparently it was a Southern California car that was imported to Guam by an illicit drug dealer who forfeited the car during the seizure of his assets once he was caught. The seller eventually imported the car back to Oregon where it resided for many years and subsequently moving to British Columbia. The seller offered to trailer the car to the Border crossing at Sumas, WA. My plan was to then drive it from Sumas to a location in Seattle area where I could then have it transported back (less a border crossing) to NC. Where in Seattle was the question. A quick scan of the Roster and a PM to the Forum's own Brian Laurence (Centurion) and i had a destination. 150 miles in an 80 year old car I've never seen but in pictures and never driven. As the weekend approached I began to realize I'm out of my mind to do it, but it's gonna be a great adventure none the less. I packed up my tools, a tow rope, spare fan belt and other supplies. I considered the possibility of bringing a spare generator, starter, etc. and decided that would just be too much weight to carry for a car the seller swears would make it the journey no problem. So I checked my bag, something a I rarely do despite traveling a LOT for work ( any tool of 7" must be checked per TSA) and off I went to Dallas. And then the fun begins... We landed in Dallas about 10-15 minutes ahead of schedule, for which I was delighted as it was going to be a tight connection. HOWEVER, another plane was in our gate so 20 minutes after our scheduled arrival time we disembarked. For those of you familiar with DFW, it is HUGE, and i not only had to switch gates, but switch terminals (on the complete opposite side of the airport). So off to the races I went. I swear it had to be a mile run ( I just checked it on Google Earth and my path was 0.80 of a mile). About 2/3 of the way to my gate I hear the final boarding call for my flight to Calgary. I yelled at an unoccupied gate agent I was passing to call to my gate and let them know I was almost there. Boarding the plane last I got a large glass of water from the attendant and settled in to my first class upgrade seat for the 4 hr flight to Calgary. It was at that moment I realize that it was wonderful that I made it, surley my bag on a more direct path would make it too. A quick interrogation of the flight attended revealed that there were in fact waiting on ONE MORE BAG. Surely that was mine...the airlines ap has a bag tracker lets see what that says....Last update: "Loaded in Charlotte"...hmm. wait 2 minutes reload...Last update: Arrived in Dallas 5:25PM...Its 535PM ok that was 10 minutes ago, they are waiting for a bag i'm good...boarding door closes...update...hmm...update...ok supposed to have this phone off...update.... ok on the runway better turn it off...and we're off. Larger portable electronics are now free to be used...update...Last update: Arrived in Dallas 5:25PM. That update did not change until well into the following day ( more on that later). So 4 hours and many beverages later (at one point the stewardess had me double fisting, Amaretto in one hand and Tito's in the other) I had to formulate a new plan as i knew my bag would never make it to Kelowna in time as i had arrange for the seller to pick me up at my hotel 8AM the next morning and I knew i was on the last flights to Calgary and Kelowna and no earlier flights existed either. Well I'd just have to do it with out tools and if I ran into trouble I had my BCA roster and a AAA card...The rest of the day went without indecent (except for no phone signal in Canada) and I arrived at my hotel at midnight pacific time 3AM my time. I filed a lost bag claim in there as well and asked they either send my bag on to Seattle or back to CLT. The seller and his wife picked me up at 8AM sharp and off we went on the roughly hour and 40 min drive back to his house and the location of the car. Here are some photos from along the way. Merritt, BC in the Nicola Valley Welcome to Merritt! We arrived at the sellers house which was chock full of neat stuff and beside the '38 he had a 65 T-bird Convertible, a 51 Chrysler, a 40 Packard 110 and a few 70s era trucks. I looked the car over, test drove it and got ready to load it up for the border...Hey where is the spare tire, it's not in the trunk?? oh there isn't one... so no tools, no spare and we are behind schedule so I'll be running out of daylight at the end of the journey... ok I can do this, no worries. So we loaded up Seller had LOT of unique stuff Shortly after we depart the seller asks his wife if she has their passports. I thought this odd and inquired why they needed their passports and if they were going into the US after they drop me at the border. "We're taking you all the way to Puyallup". You're what? I thought you were only taking me to the border and I was on my own from there? "Well you can do that if you want, but we planned to take you all the way." I quickly considered my predicament and as much as I wanted to enjoy my planned country drive through northwestern Washington state, the thought of having to brave traffic looming in Seattle, and the lack of the various items I would need in case of a break down made it an easy choice. Here are some photos from along the journey from Merritt, BC to Sumas, WA and eventually at the border. US Border at Sumas, WA We, as I assumed, hit traffic on the 405 around Seattle, creeping past the site of the 2007 BCA National Meet and eventually Mt. Rainier off in the distance. More traffic in Renton, but at 6:15 with darkness setting in we arrived, unloaded and tucked the new treasure in Brian/Centurion's garage. Brian had some friends over for game night and it was fun to meet all of them, some who seemed quite shocked that I would travel all the way from NC for a car... Brian lent me his 96 Riv to get to my hotel and back, great car...and that blue is one of my favorites of that era Buick The next morning after breakfast Brian took me on a tour of Tacoma's amazing architecture and Historic Auto Row, after that we left for the airport and I was home to CLT around 9PM, my whirlwind weekend finally over. My bag however eventually made it to Calgary...from Calgary it somehow got to LAX and arrived in Charlotte today I hoping I get frequent flier miles for my bag as well as my own journey... Griot's Garage in a former Coca-Cola bottling plant The original auto row in Tacoma Mueller- Harkins original Buick dealership above and floor of it below. Mueller-Harkins eventually replaced their original store with this circa late 40's early 50's dealership a few blocks away Love the Terrazzo!! Brian said this neighboring building was the DeSoto dealership. Certainly a trip to remember and while not quite as eventful as my father's journey to Canada to get my 80C no less epic. Many many thanks to Brian/Centurion and family for their amazing hospitality. The BCA and the forum are lucky to have such a amazing man in our midst. That's it for tonight tomorrow I will post some photos of the car itself. It's certainly not a 400 pt piece, but it will be enjoyed!
  11. 20 points
    Having attended the 2017 Annual Membership Meeting in Philadelphia this past weekend, I want to share an image that I think exemplifies the character of the man we are fortunate enough to have as our 2017 National President. It may not look like much - in fact, it doesn't even look like he is doing anything connected with AACA, discussing a lapful of vintage vinyl records with a young man obviously too young to own an antique car. What makes this image special to me is that is was taken right after the afternoon round table where Tom, along with the entire AACA National Board and staff, endured public insult and condemnation by individuals who later admitted they were ignorant of the facts concerning what they were complaining about. Tom not only responded to uncalled for and inappropriate comments with intelligence and courtesy, he explained a complex situation in a manner that was not offensive, disrespectful, or adversarial to anyone. It was a very stressful and unpleasant way to spend what should have been a time to honor and express much-deserved appreciation to our outgoing and incoming National Presidents and officers. Immediately after this meeting, Tom was approached by a young AACA member who wanted to share his latest interest - vinyl records. Most people would have still been reeling from the turmoil, but Tom not only acknowledged the young man; he sat down and talked to him at length over this new passion. A lot of AACA members talk about inspiring and encouraging future generations - Tom Cox leads by example.
  12. 19 points
    We finally had a day where we could rotate the winter toys(snowmobiles) and the summer toys(Model Ts) with the help of the my boys, and before I knew it the T was up and down the back roads with the dust flying. I was enjoying every minute watching them go. There are young kids out there that have interest in old cars and not just 60's-80's cars. Now if we just get the antique automobile insurance companies In Ontario to take off the min 10 years of driving experience before they can get insurance we would be even further ahead with getting kids involved in the hobby. For now, they are stuck to the side roads around the house. Jeff
  13. 19 points
    I have noticed that my "reputation" points clicked up a couple points. I have 691 posts here on the forum but only 73 "reputation" points. Another member, who has been here as long as I have and has ten less posts, has almost 500 reputation points. How come I have such a bad reputation on this forum? I have never had a tussle with anybody on the forum and I try and offer the correct information if I have it. How does the "reputation" point system work?
  14. 18 points
    Okay, so maybe not so good looking Buick right now, but it's about time I stop flooding "Post War" with topics and start my own Me and My Buick thread. A little bit of history: The car was purchased brand new as one of two, by my grandfather, from the Kessler dealership in Detroit, in 1956. A few weeks prior, at some point whether returning or going to the army base, my grandfather rolled his 1953 Buick Roadmaster off an embankment and came out with nothing but his life. He needed new transportation, and with the aid of his then girlfriend at the time, placed an order for one Buick Century with all the bells and whistles save AC, power windows and power seats. I'm told that my grandmother rolled the car off the assembly line, but it seems all flair considering assembly line cars had a special stamp on the firewall ID tag. Before leaving service, he purchased for his mother a sister Century (Red and Black) that had every accessory option available. The two of them then set out west, back to Seattle, where the Red and Black Century was gifted to my great grandmother, and the Blue and White Century started a family in 1958. Fast forward to 1978, the last year licensed. My grandfather is driving around a 1971 Estate Wagon 455, while his oldest son and daughter (my mother) are bombing around in the 56 Century. A good 20+ years of pampered service got my uncle through 2 years of community college (I got free parking when I went because it still has, to this day, the Green River Community College parking pass on it). One fateful afternoon, sometime after three teeth broke off the reverse ring gear in the Dynaflow, the front pump became plugged up on a rather large upward climb. My grandfather, raising a family of 5, had fallen on hard times and the car sat in a lofty car port from that day on. Fast forward to the mid 80s, where my grandfather's youngest son was in auto tech class in highschool. With good intentions, but misguidance, tore the still running 322 apart. Upon inspection, worn rocker arms were found and a few broken valve springs, among other common wear parts for a 200,000 mile car. The heads, timing cover, sprockets, chain, lifters, rocker arms and valve covers were stored in the trunk/front/back seat, the intake and Rochester 4GC left down in the basement, and the bock left bare with pistons and all to the elements, shielded only by the roof over it's head and the lofty hood. The car quickly became a pipe dream and was left in shambles. In 2010, my grandmother passed away and was the first time I can remember the whole family being in one place. My uncle (oldest son) moved to Oklahoma, and my aunt (youngest daughter) moved to Colorado. It was an unfortunate time, and while on her death bed, the car had come up in front of my grandmother several times. After she died, the house was quickly deserted and the question of who got the car was left unanswered. No one wanted it because it had zero value and was too much work. At some point around this time, and being close to graduation, I had shown interest in the car. It was my favorite since I first found it 13 or so years prior (then 18 at the time of 2010), and I had started doing a lot of research. My mother had threatened to scrap it several times during this point to clean up and sell the house, and I had pooled every thing I could save between going to the college part time and barely making enough money to pay for the classes. My saving grace was my first few tax returns, and I had saved up enough money to have the engine sent out for rebuild in 2013. Another year passes and the next tax return was used to cover the transmission. In 2015, I had amassed enough parts to finally fire the old beast off, and she awoke with the fire of a thousand suns. Her slumber was over, and it was the first time I had witnessed my grandfather cry after the passing of my grandmother. The herd came flocking, everyone suddenly wanted the car, and we got in notarized writing that the car had been gifted to me and was put in my name after a state patrol inspection October of 2015. Lady Century's legacy was reborn. Of course, most of you all are up to date with what the car has gone through, in fact, we've both gone through a lot. The 322 powerplant is now out of a 1956 Buick Roadmaster, salvaged from an LS swap after my original engine had torn itself apart on the grounds of poor workmanship. The rear end, as I found out from my grandfather, didn't have the correct pinion pre-load, which allowed the pinion to hammer the carrier and prompted me to find a rear end from a Special. The power steering box and pump, after being rebuilt, are still sloppy and the pump itself was put together wrong, which resulted in the pulley tearing apart the end shaft - also a junkyard journey. My starter flew itself apart, and eventually so did the generator to an extent, which prompted me to find a junkyard replacement for the former and a re-manufactured replacement for a 1956 Chevy for the latter. I have also upgraded the brakes on the front to Roadmaster brakes and repaired the master cylinder myself. The suspension from front to back, save the front coil springs, A-arm bushings and king pins, have been replaced completely. I also replaced the original Rochester 4GC with a Carter WCFB. I even rebuilt the power antenna, rebuilt the tube radio, and repaired the clock, blower motor and cigarette lighter. This car is fully functional front to back, with front and rear speakers and all the fixings of a 1956 luxury sports car. All that's left to do now is paint, glass, chrome and interior - the hard stuff. This car will be following me on my exodus over Snoqualmie pass, where I will spend the next two years at Washington State University, fulfilling my degree in Mechanical Engineering. This thread will be the continuation of my experiences with my Buick as I journey forward. I hope you guys enjoy the ride!
  15. 18 points
    Oh and here’s a follow up of the ditch digging photo. The Argosy barn has lights. But nothing compared to Gods light as displayed in this photo. Thank ya Jesus, thank ya Lord🙏
  16. 18 points
    WOW my generation gap is showing, I saw the title listed and when I clicked on this expected to see an MG , TC not a Chrysler Town and Country. Anyone else have that reaction as well?
  17. 18 points
    Names and places have been changed or omitted to protect the innocent. A few months ago I sold a wonderful automobile to a gentleman who lived some distance from me. He called and had several conversations. We sent additional information and helped him get an inspection and financed through a third party. Once everything was in place he was going to wire the funds. The day before he was set to wire funds his wife called and left a scathing 10 minute message on our answering machine which would garner a R rating in theaters. Her opinion was that we helped her husband buy this car behind her back and we were evil. She continued that he is not allowed to buy any more cars. We also received a nasty email from her explaining that her husband was not buying anything with out her permission. We assumed this was the end of the deal. The next day our customer called happy as could be. Said he was sending the funds and couldn't wait to get his car. I asked what about your wife? His response was that he was in the process of moving out and had already called a divorce attorney. She asked him the choose between her and another car. He added that he couldn't wait to get the car. So the age old excuse that guys love to use: "I have to check with my wife" has been made null and void. You don't need to check with the wife, just have a good divorce attorney.
  18. 18 points
    Well, I promised my wife that I was not going to buy a car at Mecum Indy where I am this week. Intended to just have fun watching others spend money and a lot of nice Buicks changing hands. Yesterday I broke my promise.I was thumbing through a catalog of The Maryland Collection, 47 cars being sold at 'No Reserve' and noticed a 1921 Buick Touring car for sale. I walked to the display and was blown away by this wonderful car that had been restored over the years and looked awesome. In the back seat was a 3 ring binder full of the car's history including history back to early 60's, complete restoration receipts from 1979-80 and later by the renowned White Post Restorations of White Post, VA.After reading about the car and work done I decided to check with a friend that knows early Buicks on pricing to confirm what I thought the car might be worth. We were both on the same page so I decided to bid on the car and after spirited bidding, I won the car. I am thrilled as it will be a fun car for family, shows, parades etc. Apparently there are very few 1921 Buicks left, especially in this condition. The car had been sitting in a 100+ car collection in Maryland for more than 10 years and after the passing of the father in 2017, the family decided to liquidate the collection, hence my lucky day.Called the wife and explained what I had done, then sent photos and she forgives me since she loves the older, antique cars.Buicks forever Chuck
  19. 18 points
    Thought this worth sharing with the Forum. This 1930 Lincoln model L engine has come back to life after 65+ years of being dormant. Now on to the rest of the car........
  20. 18 points
    Took a lot of these pictures over a year ago but just finding a rainy day to post them. This room use to be my son Jordan's room before and while he was in college. Then it became a "spare bedroom" but began collecting a lot of "pitch it in the door" junk. I finally decided to take it over for my office. After cleaning it of all the junk and repairing some of the mysterious holes in the sheet rock that had been hidden for years with Johnny Cash and Marine Corp posters (at least he had good taste in posters), Rita and Terry commenced to painting the walls in 1954 Buick colors of Tunis Blue and Malibu Blue. Note also the cabinets and tables are "Buick Engine Green" which I think goes great with the '54 Buick blue colors. Thanks for looking and hope you enjoy. "1954 BUICK HEADQUARTERS" That's sort of panoramic look. I can post some close ups and detail shots if any interest.
  21. 18 points
    I received my Buick Bugle in the mail a few days ago now an excellent publication all round per usual. I would draw your attention to the "Barn Find" article by our own Lamar Brown (aka Mr. Earl). An excellent story with great pictures. The outcome of the quick turnaround on the cars was amazing. The crown jewel of course being the pre-war sedan which I know will be well taken care of by one of, if not the newest member of the pre-war forum under the Buick heading. So now we can add to his already impressive resume the title "pre-war correspondent". KUDOS to you Lamar for saving these fine Buicks, finding them good homes and writing a great article about the whole adventure. Oh and thank you to your understanding missus as well.
  22. 18 points
    and it will never be the same. Good ol' Dandy Dave paid us an overnight visit and fun was had by all. His visit could not have come at a better time as I was making my last haul of parts from the barn find purchase. So I guess you could call it a working vacation. But it sure made the task of loading and unloading engines and transmissions and doors and fenders much more fun not to mention easier on this old mans back. Plus I think he has unloaded a few engines in his lifetime. No pictures of us working but here are a few of the good times. This guy is a hoot and has a lot of knowledge stored in that head of his. Rita and I enjoyed his stay immensely. Oh and the Cap'n was there also. Sweet Reet and Dandy Dave "just a swingin" out by Buick Pond This guy is the first visitor ever to Buick Gardens to know what these two things were. Anybody else know? We're saying "Cheers" to all the BCA Forum members here. "CHEERS" . And I think this is when I exclaimed "It ain't heaven, but it'll do til we get there" Rita just kept sayin "this guy is funny" "this guy is a genius" "I love this guy" !!!! WATCH THE UPHOLSTERY SON, watch the upholstery!!!!! Elvis like him too, but I didn't get any shots of him with DD. Maybe Dave did. Dave explained to me the difference between a Yankee and a Damn Yankee... a "yankee" is sombody from up nawth. A "damn yankee" is somebody from up nawth who stays. Thanks for the good times and help Dave, have a good flight back to New Yawk.
  23. 17 points
    I am honored to be the recipient of "The Terry B. Dunham Historical Award," for 2018, the Buick BUGLE's Literary Award, for my article, "The History of Buick on La Isla de Cuba." Presented just last Saturday at the BCA's National Meet in Denver, the award pays homage to legendary Buick historian and author Terry B. Dunham. I met Terry at Hershey about 20 years ago, our only face-to-face meeting, but we communicated about Buick history over the years before his untimely passing in 2012. What a thrill to receive recognition for an unchartered area of Buick history about which Terry would be enthsuiastic, encouraging and proud. From the Buick Club's 2012 Tribute... "Terry B. Dunham, 72, the founder and a past president of the Buick Heritage Alliance, died on Friday, November 2, 2012. Terry was considered one of the world’s leading experts on the heritage of the Buick automobile, creating an award-winning book, a national enthusiasts’ organization, an innovative website for vintage car owners and major magazine articles." http://www.buickclub.org/terry-dunham-tribute/ Thanks to the BCA, BUGLE Editor Pete Phillips and Cindy Livingston, Graphic Artist Extraordinaire! TG
  24. 17 points
    My wife Bonnie finally got her first ride in "Miss Vicky", our '25 Buick Standard Coupe. In fact,it was the first run for the car this year.Runs like a watch. Jim
  25. 17 points
    I recently involved in the sale of a large collection of cars. I saw classic outstanding vintage cars nestled in with simple inexpensive cars in all shapes and condition. A massive collection of over 300 cars. There seemed to be no order, no theme. I talked with the manager, Jeff who had maintained these cars for about 24 years. This was the Collection of S. Truett Cathy, Founder of Chick-fil-a. Jeff asked Truett why he was buying so many different cars, and Truett responded, "For Investments." That made sense to Jeff. Investments in classic cars can often bring great rewards. But Jeff noticed that Truett had bought a car and paid much too much. Very much more than the possible value. Jeff thought he should mention this "mistake" to Truett? Maybe Truett didn't know he paid too much? But Truett had brought a small restaurant into a multi-billion dollar business and Truett had told Jeff that he was buying cars as investments and this made no sense to Jeff. Fortunately, Jeff needed to get some paperwork from the seller and the seller mentioned that Truett had really "blessed him." He went on to say that he had cancer. He was broke and could not continue treatments until Truett bought his car giving him enough money to pay his bills and get additional treatment and he was now cancer-free. Jeff realized that when Truett Cathy spoke about investments, he meant investments in people. The money flowed as well, but Truett Cathy's business was based on investments in people. Think about this if you happen to be in a Chick-fil-a restaurant. It is an enjoyable place for happy employees serving an experience. People connecting with people. It pays great dividends. Investments.
  26. 16 points
    OK, so yes, this could just go in the ACD section, but thought it might be of more general interest. Sometimes things happen that make you scratch your head while wondering what cosmic forces are at work. I own a 1937 Cord phaeton, unrestored, which means it's not totally "original" as far as paint goes, but it's never been taken down to it's component parts. A number of years back, I took it to the ACD Festival in Auburn. While there, I had it "certified" by the ACD club, which basically means it's a real car, has genuine factory components, and is now documented in the Club's archives. While having my Cord certified, it was pointed out that my car did not have the correct engine, but not to worry, a LOT of Cords have replacement engines. The "factory" in Auburn was kept open (by another person, but that's a longer story) into the 1950's for ACD repair and refurbishment, and the thought is that my engine and transmission were changed out then. My transmission has traces of red paint, which I was also told may be an indication of a 50's refurbishment. So, by now you're asking, where is this story leading? I'll make it simple. The fellow in the ACD club who's in charge of the Certification project was a recipient of a few emails from me about another subject, and he casually mentioned "Oh, by the way, I have the engine out of your Cord..." WHAT?? Yes, data plate on the car shows engine number FB 2035, I have that engine that was in a group of parts that I found. So, let me make this clear. I bought a Cord in 1985, with an engine that had been replaced at least 30 years prior to that, and here it is almost 40 years after I bought the car and YOU HAVE THE CORRECT ENGINE FOR IT?!?! I made a trip into the wilds of Pennsylvania today with a good friend of mine, and acquired the engine. I have no plans to rebuild and install, although the block is in great condition, but just having it with the car means a lot to me. Attached pictures of car data plate and engine number. Am I blessed with some good luck, or what? And don't say "what"....
  27. 16 points
    Here in Northern California the nights are around 31 with a high of about 50 degrees. With a storm forecasted for the weekend I decided to get the 1929 Studebaker President out for a New Years drive today. Headed up into the foothills and put about 60 miles on the Studebaker. The day was perfect for driving in the hills on quite back roads.
  28. 16 points
    we just finished up my 1915 pre-fab gas station with pre-visable Gilbert & Barker gas pumps . Also working on a 1913 standard gas station with island pump cover will more of standard when finished . The windows came from old 100 year old building s that have been demo .
  29. 16 points
    A friend in Buena Park, CA, the late Al Newman, drove one of these cars from CA to Baltimore in 1967 for the first car show of a new club I was involved in starting. That was the first 41 Limited I ever saw. In 1971 he did it again from Fullerton, CA. I made up my mind then that I wanted one. In 1973 In I bought this car from Wally Rank Buick in Milwaukee, WI it was silver on the bottom and black on the top. The first airplane ride of my life was from Baltimore to Milwaukee and back to see this car and another one he had in his collection. Rank had bought it from a guy in Napa, CA. That guy, the late David Bissell, told me it had once belonged to CA Gov Goodwin Knight. In 2004 I saw a car at a CA AACA National Meet and that guy said, NO, his car had belonged to the Governor. Somebody had reupholstered the door panels and seats in brown naugahyde. Don Prather of Waldorf, MD reupholstered those areas to match the rest of the original interior. My friend repainted the car in my new garage with a Silver French Gray top and Lancaster Gray bottom, which I picked out of the Prestige Brochure. I paid $225 for the NOS trunk ornament, the most I had ever paid for a part to that time. Skirts came from California. They were standard on this model. I was cleaning out Buick dealerships in the DelMarVA area and selling parts at the time and kept all the NOS for myself. Every piece of chrome was NOS, some I did have to buy at Hershey Flea Markets, some I had. I had every piece of the transmission and a young mechanic neighbor named Bill Bond totally rebuilt the transmission with every part new. We rebuilt the speedometer and turned it back to zero and had the woodgraining redone by a local restoration shop. Both carburetors were rebuilt by an expert or were NOS. The tires came with the car and were called Lincoln Highway. I even found NOS hubcaps. In 1977 we drove the car to Hershey on a rainy day and I won a First Junior Award....my first-ever AACA National First. Once I sold it in 1981 I never saw or heard of it again. About 5-6 years ago I got a burr in my saddle to try and find it again. I named it "The Governor", but maybe it wasn't that car after all. Yesterday, after 37 years I found it. It was a very exciting day for me. It is in good hands. I joined BCA in 1966, attended the first BCA National in Flint in 1971, and again in 1972. I was only 35 when I bought this car. Now I'm 79 going on 80. It's been a good ride in this hobby, and this sort of exciting experience is what makes the hobby one that keeps on giving. I met the guy who knew how to do the research to help find this needle in a haystack right here on this thread and made a new friend too.
  30. 16 points
    BIG DAY! First time this car moved under it's own power since I've owned it...and probably since the '70s! Front bumper adjusted and aligned: Can't wait to drive this beast! There are a couple of updates in this next photo. First is the polished hubcap and the new emblem, ready for installation. And beneath the hubcap and emblems are the pre-cut deadener/insulators for the bottom of the spare tire storage compartment. Assembled hubcap installed: The rear bumper trim panels and all of them were corroded and/or dented. These replacements were made by Todd Reiter at Reiter's Metal Craft. They've been primed and are painted with the dull aluminum color for the "silver" areas of the panels. I made a template from the original parts to help with the masking. The aluminum color stripes are 1/8" wide, the black bands are 11/32" wide. After masking the aluminum base layer, the black was painted and the mask peeled. One panel came out perfect, but a few areas of the aluminum paint came off with the masking tape. Do-over went well: Mocking up the center section of the rear bumper. It's going to look great! Installing the deadener strips on the spare tire stowage area: Contact cement and a rubber roller...job done! Finishing up with the floor pan deadener installation: Harness covers installed at all 4 door openings:
  31. 16 points
    We need some positive posts on the Forum. The Buick Club is a great club with great people and this thread will prove that. This past month I've been helped by 4 BCA members and I want to thank them for what they have done for me and I invite you to thank a BCA member who has done you right. I'll start in chronological order for the past month 1. Lamar Brown - I asked if Lamar would be interested in trailering my 80C to Hershey. Without hesitation he was on board and sacrificed his time and drove significant distance to help me finally have my 80C on the showfield at Hershey 2. Bob Coker - When we found Lamar's trailer was just a hair to small for my 80C he lent Lamar and I truck and trailer to get to Hershey. 3. Brian Laurance - I asked Brian if I could store a to be purchase Buick at his place while I arranged for transportation back east. Without hesitation he agreed and then proceeded to remove his own car from his garage so mine could be inside and give me a tour historic dealership buildings of Tacoma. 4. Paul Haddock - Paul offered up his truck and trailer to me so I could take my 80C to Hilton Head for the Concours. While I've sent a personal thank you to each of them, I want to publicly thank them as well for their assistance. And while this is just a few great BCA members who've done something in the past month I can think of numerous others I owe a thank you to ( Ben Bruce, Brian Clark, Dave Berquist, Dave Tachney, and John Kilbane are a few that come to mind). Which BCA member has done you right and deserves a thank you???
  32. 16 points
    NOS 55 fender on Ebay in Michigan , emailed Roberta if anyone near flint could pickup the fender and bring it to one of the Buick meets. Roberta said I can do that . And so the fender started a long trip from Flint to Oswego, NY then to New Freedom PA by Roberta's brother Ted and then to Timonium ,Md . I had to drive almost 15 whole miles ( LOL )to pick up the fender . This is what the Buick club people will do to help others !! Thanks Roberta and Ted ! The fender safe at its new home . Bill Lagna BCA 3030
  33. 16 points
    Drove my 1970 stick shift Wildcat 240 miles round trip to the Pate Swap Meet north of Ft. Worth, Texas this weekend. Had time to wax and polish it all over--cleanest it has been in 3 or 4 years! First Pate Swap meet in many years that wasn't threatened by spring thunderstorms or hail! Pete Phillips, BCA #7338 Leonard, TX.
  34. 16 points
    David Landow's latest restoration wins a major prize at the Amelia Island Concours d'Elegance. The restoration is over the top and the attention to detail and authenticity simply astounding. The award was presented by the head of GM styling at this weekend's show of over 300 spectacular cars. Even this Olds guy was wowed by this great roadster.
  35. 16 points
    It all started with an email from an old friend and Dixie Chapter member Bruce Kile advising that he and a friend were going to look at some old Buick's in a warehouse and because there was a 54 involved thought I might be interested in joining them. I of course said sure and made plans to meet up with them at the warehouse in Toccoa Georgia. Toccoa is a small town in NE Georgia located about 50 miles from me and I have always known it to have lots of old Buick's in it. We met at the warehouse and was met by a super nice gentleman named Ray who told us the story behind all the Buicks we were about to see. The Buick's had belonged to the owner of Tugalo Gas Company who had passed away about 25 years ago. We met his son Tom, who is the current owner and learned that Ray was the Vice President of the company. We spent probably about 3 hours looking over the cars and I of course spent half of that looking at the '54 which was a solid 4 door Century with near perfect glass, original seat upholstery under old seat covers and had had a respray. The rest of the cars consisted of: 1938 Special Model 44, 2 door Streamline Sport Sedan 1940 Super Model 51 Four-Door Touring Sedan 1953 Special 4 door 1953 Super 4 door 1962 Electra 225 4 door 4 window 1963 Special 4 door 1963 LeSaber 4 door After looking over the cars we had a late lunch at M&J's Home Cooking Restaurant, a buffet style restaurant there in town. We discussed the cars and the fact that the owner was looking for offers and as the cars had been collected by his father, he wanted to ensure they went to good homes. Bruce and his friend were quite amazed at what we had seen but had no real interest in purchasing anything . I on the other hand, upon arriving home talked it over with Rita and we decided I should at least make an offer on the little 54 Century. The next day I called Ray and he informed me he had had calls from two individuals very interested in the cars and especially the '38. I made him an offer on the '54 and he said he guessed he could do it, but would I possibly be interested in the whole lot and quoted a figure that I had to ask him to repeat to ensure I had heard correctly. Considering the very fair figure that he had thrown at me and the fact I knew he had others interested in the cars, I quickly answered that I would take them. All the time realizing this was a bit more than Rita and I had discussed and immediately began wondering how the hell was I going to break this news to her. The following Monday I began hauling the Buicks home to Buick Gardens. But not before calling and suggesting to Ken Green here on the forum that he bring his trailer and if he liked the 40 Super he could take it home with him and if not he could deliver it to my house. We had lunch at M&J's Buffet, talked over the deal and as already learned from his new thread, he took it home with him. Luckily I am still married and over the last week have made a number of trips through the beautiful winding roads of the Northeast Georgia countryside hauling these wonderful old Buicks home. Ken graciously agreed to help haul the two big girls, the LeSabre and the Electra 225. It appears I have not only gained seven more Buicks this week but also some new friends. Ray and Tom were two of the nicest people you would ever hope to meet and plan to keep in touch in letting them know where the Buicks find homes. Ken is in Atlanta and I am sure we will be getting together to turn some wrenches or pound on some metal. Life in Buickland is good. From the first day we visited. Lets start with the oldest first.... the 38 and 40. The 38 was restored back in the early 80's and driven, gorgeous interior. The 40 was being worked on when the owner died, leaving the interior to be finished. more, much more to come..........
  36. 16 points
    What have you learned on this sight? (see below if you question my spelling) Here's my list: THINGS I’VE LEARNED ON THE AACA FORUM The best and most relevant advice you can give a would-be seller is “call Jay Leno”. A car in a nice metal building with fluorescent lights can be called a barn find. Leaving the dust, dirt, and pigeon droppings on a found car tremendously increases the value of said car. Every unidentified car in a picture is a Ford. If it’s not a Ford, then it’s a Packard. The forum is on a sight, not a site. There are breaks on car, not brakes (oh, wait, this might actually be correct, old cars do break). There, there, they’re selling their car. Some grammar is unexceptable. Accept mine. No matter how fine a restoration is, when pictures are posted of the finished car, someone will say something like: “well, it’d be a nice car if that flabberdash crickpat were rotated ten degrees clockwise, like its supposed to be, ruins the whole car”. An Antique Automobile forum can allow the words “computer”, “module”, and “electronic” to be posted. Oh, and "error codes"..... 6 volt batteries never worked, and it wasn’t until 12 volt batteries became commonplace that everyone got to work on time. Two wheel brakes don’t work, so they should be upgraded to: Four wheel brakes, but they don’t work, so should be upgraded to: Hydraulic brakes, but darn, they don’t work because they are: Drum brakes. Thank goodness disc brakes were invented or we’d never be able to stop.
  37. 16 points
    My son and his fiancée made a very special request of me back in May of 2017. They asked me to chauffeur them in my '41 Buick Roadmaster sedan on their wedding day. I was thrilled to be given this opportunity. I was also quite anxious. My car is no beauty and it is on a constant repair and improvement schedule. A lot had to be done before the wedding date. I have chronicled the event on my WordPress blog and you are welcome to read the entire story. Just click the blue link to get there. I hope some folks enjoy the story and are encouraged to post their own story here on the AACA forum. Thanks! (Note: Photograph courtesy of Matt Ferrara Photography)
  38. 16 points
    The colors haven't really arrived here in SW Ontario but will a corn field do ? I posted these on Me and MY Buick but they fit here too.The '25 is just getting it's legs back after a 37 year slumber. Jim
  39. 16 points
    Took the Roadmaster out to the last big cars and coffee of the season. Temps in the 70s today and tomorrow, first snow storm of the season on Monday. Had the Eldorado out too, just to enjoy the weather. Scott
  40. 16 points
    While I'm often frustrated by the lack of precision in the hobby's language ("restored" does not mean a brand new small block Chevy engine in your Ford roadster), I think the meaning of "NOS" or "New Old Stock" is such that everyone in the hobby knows what it means. It is not a term that is abused like "restored," "classic," or "original,", but rather one that can potentially be naively mis-interpreted as the OP suggests. However, unless you're a total rookie, I don't think you'll be swindled by someone using that term to describe a part that was made in-period and never installed or used on a car. Everyone pretty much agrees on the definition of NOS. Nobody's buying an NOS fender for their 1940 Buick thinking that GM just stamped it last week because of the word "new" in its description. Now the condition of NOS parts is something else, but that's probably not something that can be remedied by changing the terminology we use to describe vintage parts that have not been used. I wouldn't use an NOS carburetor kit, but I understand perfectly that it is a carburetor kit that was made in-period and never used. There is exactly zero confusion over what it is when it is described as "NOS." It is still technically new and unused, but it was made a long time ago. No confusion, especially not with the weight of decades of proper use behind the term. I think this particular issue is a solution in search of a problem.
  41. 15 points
    Just thought I’d mention the efforts of those who post detailed restoration threads in this forum. For many, there are hours and hours of research spent on their project then hours and hours of physical work spent. While many understand those parts of a restoration, I don’t believe many realize unless they’ve done it, is the hours spent documenting their work. Many of us enjoy reading, viewing the pictures, and learning from these people, most don’t realize or fully understand the immense effort put in to make those threads so entertaining and informative. Time is spent by stopping ones work to take step by step pictures, more-time spent by recording measurements, readings, etc., Then, when the physical work is done, most relax by going through their daily pictures, notes, and general mental thoughts to prepare their often daily posts. I personally spend hours and hours in my garage though my wife barely complains of being a “garage widow”. What she does complain about is all the time spent on my computer or iPad. She often says “you’d have more things done on your car if you spent less time on the damn forums!” So thinking of what she said I immediately realized that I’m just a small part of all spending the same amount of time posting their work. My hat goes off to those here like Luv2wrench, Mike Macartney, Ron Haussmann, Matt Hinson, Joe Puleo, Hurrst, Rich Bad, Laughiing Coyote, and all the others. This forum is the most enjoyable on the site because of all you.
  42. 15 points
    We arrived at the host hotel just after 4 pm today. That makes it almost exactly 24 hours for the trip from Cary, North Carolina to Auburn, Indiana, with a stop overnight in Charleston, WV. The trip odometer shows 702 miles traveled when we arrived at the hotel. It was a great trip. We enjoyed some of the variety of the roadways seen in the US. We traveled on a lot of Interstates, some other large roads, small mountain country roads, a bit of the old Lincoln Highway and about everything else you can imagine. We ate a great meal at an Ohio truck stop that has been in operation since the 1950s on the LIncoln Highway. The waitress asked if she could have a photo taken with the car, so we went outside and another of the employees took a bunch of photos of her with our car. I took a few photos on the road to hopefully capture a small sample of the sights. These were shot with the "hold up the camera, point it through the windshield without looking through the viewfinder, and push the button technique". On Sunday, I typically drove between 65 and 75 miles per hour most of the trip. Today, since I was not trying to get anwhere before it got dark, I took my time and we cruised at 65 mph. I knew that the speedometer was off a little so when I thought to check it via gps today, I remembered that it displays 3 mph slow at those speeds, so I guess today's average cruising speed was actually 68. This Century is happiest when going down the road with the speedometer showing between 60 and 65. The Ford truck had a nice air conditioner, but to be honest, we were comfortable in the Buick going down the road with just the cowl vent open and the back wing windows open. That gives you a nice gentle breeze through the car with little wind noise. For those who think you need to modify a car to enjoy it, I will point out that this is a 6 volt car with bias ply tires, and the original unpressurized coolant system. It never needed a drop of water added to the radiator. We have already had a great trip and now we get to tour with friends old and new in the 36-38 Buick Club for a few days!
  43. 15 points
    Well, you leave for a couple of days and look what happens! Hey, folks I needed a little humor today. You will be getting a thorough and complete explanation in the next couple of days including documentation and proof that the letter sent by the museum board was nothing more than an attempt to smear our club and cause discontent within our ranks. You will hear from our entire board and you will see a document from our attorney that will speak volumes. Not innuendo, not "we have heard" but a fact based document. You will have to ask yourself why the museum is fighting to keep a charade of a relationship when it is not a part of AACA. This is by far the strongest words I have used here since this tragic story has begun. There are some people on the museum board I like and respect. I have no idea why they are a party to all of this but that is their right. I know one thing, your executive director and your board have not made this personal and you have to question what kind of person or persons use this as a tactic (which it obviously is). Now for the opposite. THANK YOU! To all of you who have stood up for me personally (hey guys it goes with the territory to get a little mud slung) and for AACA and our leadership I cannot possibly convey my great appreciation for your willingness to go public with your thoughts. I do not know all of you but I do know some, we do not always agree but we have done so respectfully. A lesson others need to learn. The other opposite, and not meant to highjack this thread was the wonderful members who put on our Winter Meet this weekend. Wow what a great, warm and hospitable crew! It was a fabulous weekend for the club and all who attended in a great location. Most of your board were in attendance. AACA is about what is good in the hobby. Consider our mission, this forum that hosts many car clubs for free, our library that is free to the world and on and on in small and big ways. Now we are going to add another major great step around the country for AACA to be present at other antique car related venues. Stay tuned! We hope to have our response out to the museum's letter on Monday but if not I am sure by Tuesday. We will not sink into the gutter to give a response although it would be fun!
  44. 15 points
    JUST REALIZED A MILESTONE - MY 4,000TH POST ON OUR FORUM. Ten Days short of Ten Years Since Joining, and averaging just over one post per day since that time, This is an appropriate time to take note, and for me to thank the many, many individuals who make our FORUM the exceptional interchange of information, expertise, experience, humor, and sharing. My vehicles show the benefit of your comments, as does my life. I've had the benefit of meeting many of you in person during our travels, on Tour, while Judging at our Meets, or just on vacation. Regrettably, I'll never have the experience of meeting most of you. We come together from many different walks of life, differing life and work experience, are geographically dispersed, chronologically varied in age from teens to nineties and possibly beyond, perhaps favor many differing types of vehicles, yet all contribute to the overall community, each in a special way. Some of us collect, or restore, or maintain, some broker or flip, and others may simply observe! - some prefer the technical aspects and others maybe not? - some restore simply for the end result, others are dedicated to the competitive aspects of Show/Meet/ Concourse, and still others are dedicated to literature or to the Tour/Driving portion of our lifestyle. The choice of era - Brass, Nickel, Glidden, Chrome, Tuner, etc - Four-wheeling, or Two (or three?)- gas, diesel, electric, hybrid- all of the above? ... but our dissimilarities make us all the more similar and comparable - and hopefully the collector vehicle community is better for that ! I simply want to thank all of you who make our FORUM the pleasant, safe, informative, educational, fun and enjoyable place it has become, and with proper guidance, will continue to be. With best regards to all with our wish for health and happiness for the holiday season and the new year, Marty
  45. 15 points
    These photos or similar ones have appeared elsewhere on this forum but they fit here,too. The 1925 Standard Six Four Passenger Coupe was restored in the '70's and sat for 37 years.I bought it in July 2017 and just got it all sorted out in time to put it away again for the winter. The 1929 McLaughlin-Buick Master Close-coupled sedan underwent a ten year year restoration from cow scratching post to show winner.I bought it several years ago.
  46. 15 points
    Took the 56 on the After Tour for our Regional Meet. About 90 miles preplanned, add a few for when I got everyone lost in the hills of Rennselear, NY.
  47. 15 points
    5:30 this morning at work. This morning was quite warmer than yesterdays 42degrees. Was a balming 56!
  48. 15 points
    These are some great pictures of membership cars. Wonderful Thread. Here are some favorites of my 28 Buick Standard Sport Touring. The oldest ones are from 1948. The man standing next to the car is my granddad. The one with all the family was taken in the summer of 55. That's my dad driving and my two older sisters plus me in back and a family friend. The last ones are about 2008. Thanks Dave_B