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  1. Reminds me of the senior gentleman who was pulling up to parallel park his Bently when, quick as a wink, a 20 year old fellow in a small sports car wheels in behind him and grabs the spot. He jumps out of his car, smirking and as he passes the old boy he says "See old timer, if you were young and quick like me, you could've done that." Without flinching, the old boy puts the Bently in reverse and, to the chagrin of the younger man, proceeds to crush the little sports car between his rear bumper and the car behind. He steps from the car and says to the young man "And if you were old and rich like me, you could've done that".
    21 points
  2. Most of my cars have two names. One if it’s running correctly, the other for when it’s not!
    18 points
  3. BOOM! Mission accomplished! Gary at the Canton Classic Car Museum comes through again! He had exactly one of these that wasn't cracked or welded and this is it. I only wanted to borrow it to get my car back on the road and then have one reproduced over the winter, but they were willing to sell this one to me outright. I didn't even hesitate and just took out my wallet. They note that they're probably just about done restoring Lincolns so selling off their parts cache is in the near future. Now I don't feel as guilty and I'll be picking up a lot of spares as soon as they say the sale is a go. I bet there's enough stuff there to assemble a dozen Lincoln KA/KB/K chassis and keep another 50 cars on the road indefinitely. Gary notes that the holes in these covers are NOT symmetrical and we had to make sure this cover was for a later water pump like mine. We went to the store room where he had--I kid you not--15 or 20 Lincoln K water pumps sitting on the shelf in various conditions and states of assembly. Sure enough, this one fits the later pump so I'm good to go. Gary recommends reaming the holes slightly oversize and using black RTV to assemble this rear cover rather than a gasket--the gasket is what makes them crack because it's too easy to torque it down unevenly. It's a precision fit and it's not under any pressure, so only a tiny bit of RTV is needed around the perimeter to seal it up. He hasn't steered me wrong yet, so I'll take his advice. The other part in the third photo is something that Gary makes for all of these water pumps to bypass the built-in oil cooler. It's not really an oil "cooler" but an oil "warmer." Gary recommends removing it and they make this bypass tube to eliminate the original honeycomb block. Since we're not driving the cars in winter weather, there's no reason to warm the oil with coolant, nor any reason to add the heat of the oil to the radiator. And even though my core checked out OK, Gary said that sooner or later I'll have maple syrup in my cooling system because they are all on the verge of failure. So he gave me one of their bypass units which I'll have Jim install when he assembles the pump. I'm going to run these parts out to Jim later today or tomorrow so he can get to work assembling the pump. I don't know what next steps will be, but first and foremost I want to thank Joe, Ed, and and tom_in_nh for leaping into action to help me out. I'm still thinking about reproducing these covers since most of them seem to be cracked, but I'm not sure how that would work. Do it in billet steel or aluminum on a lathe or have new ones cast in bronze? I don't know if there's a market, but I can't be the only guy who needed one (I bet a bunch of folks need them and don't know it yet). But at any rate, THANK YOU for your sincere and selfless generosity to help me out. I suspect you're all a little relieved that this project won't drag you into a black hole of Lincoln, but it sure made me feel good to have friends like you who so eagerly stepped up to extend a helping hand. You have my most sincere gratitude. Let's see what happens next. Hopefully we hear the sound of this thing running very soon...
    18 points
  4. I am the proud new owner of this car. She’s in great original condition. Only 24,500 miles since new. Same family owned since new. Original paint. All the gauges work. Even the horn and radio work great . With a nice detail she should clean up nice with a good detail.
    17 points
  5. The AACA Eastern Fall Meet (Hershey) car show, car corral and flea market are back in business this year... barring any catastrophe! There are still some flea market, car corral and car show spots open. If you need car corral or flea market info call Sue at 717-534-1910 and she will send it to you. The deadline is August 15th. Car show info may also be mailed to you or go to our home page and register online. AACA Eastern Fall Meet Brochure in PDF RM Auctions will also be conducting their traditional 2-day auction at the Hershey Lodge as well! --- There are irresponsible, malicious and totally uninformed comments being made that are damaging to vendors, sellers, the region and AACA. Please help dispel the rumors that the fall event is leaving Hershey... it is NOT!
    17 points
  6. HUGE ANNOUNCEMENT HERE - THE ENGINE RAN FOR THE FIRST TIME IN 45 YEARS AND 6 DAYS THIS AFTERNOON!! As Larry said in the previous post, the engine ran this afternoon for about 10 minutes. I watched the ammeter running at a steady 'charge', the oil pump was doing its job by sending oil up through the sight gauge on the dash, the water pump packing was doing its job with no leakage so far, and the Marvel Carburetor had no signs of fuel leakage. The engine was running on the fuel in the vacuum tank as the gasoline tank is bone dry empty. I sure am glad that I went to the trouble of priming the oil pump. Things got a little smoky from the assembly grease on the valves and that will dissipate rather quickly on the next run. I started the engine with the exhaust cutout open so as to help it breathe a little better and I am here to say that a John Deere tractor hasn't got anything on this engine. Keeping in mind that this engine was dry, it started on the third attempt of the starter pedal. My daughter and son-in-law are going to be here tomorrow afternoon and we will get the arrangements made to shoot the video so that everyone can see the results of this rebuild/restoration. For the short time that it ran it sure sounded good. More to come. Terry Wiegand South Hutchinson, Kansas AACA Life Member #947918
    17 points
  7. The other day I spotted an add on eBay for a 32’ 6 cylinder Olds motor. Looking at the pictures I could see it had an original and unmolested Stromberg EC-2 carburetor, the Stromberg automatic choke, the wrong but rare 8cyl fuel pump, a correct starter, the wrong generator, a transmission, and a free wheeling unit with its lever. The EC-2 carburetor alone is worth a ton because the top half is the same part used on the auburn 12’s. The fuel pump is another valuable item along with the Stromberg auto choke. I didn’t have a spare motor for my car and probably will never need one but still wanted one for backup. I called the owner and e told me he purchased the motor at a Florida antique auto flea market and was told it was taken out of a restored car in perfect running condition! Ya, we’ve all heard that one before. The pictures told a different story as the motor was painted blue instead of the proper green, it was covered with tons of dirt, and other parts like the carb, manifold, and fuel pump had been sprayed with aluminum paint right over the dirt! Knowing what the rare parts are worth and if the we broken, I could fix them as I had already fixed those same parts on my own car, I made a deal for the motor. I was lucky to find a local guy to me who was going down to Florida with a flatbed truck and he picked it up and delivered it door to door for the right money. After looking the motor over, I found the oil clean, the trans clean with good oil, and all linkages free. I removed the generator and fan unit then pulled the plugs. All were evenly blackened some but nothing real bad. I decided to do a compression test for shits and giggles. Here’s what I got. #1-100, #2-105, #3-105, #4-105, #5-105, #6-100. Holy crap, I didn’t believe it so I did the test again. Same thing. I pulled the top cover off the carburetor bowl and blew it out to get all the dry fuel residue out. I set up a small gravity tank to the carb, watched the float come up then stop. I screwed the cover back down and worked the throttle linkage a couple times to see a nice squirt of fuel from the accelerator pump. Can’t be, can it, I thought. There was a complete set of wires and cap on it along with a coil so I hooked up a battery and turned it over. It fired to life and ran wonderfully. The trans shifted great and the free wheeling unit works as it should. So I guess we can’t always judge a book by it’s obvious cover. Yes I know it doesn’t mean all is completely well and I won’t know that until I go looking deeper but it a good start. Removing the trans I found a fairly new gasket and a sealed front trans bearing telling me that the original had been changed. Overall I took somewhat of a chance but it appears it worked out. I have a spare motor (core) if ever needed.
    16 points
  8. Thoughts......... Oil pressure issue needs to be resolved. Bypass or full flow oil filter? Is there a restricted orifice if it’s bypassed? Instant low pressure issue if not correct at idle. Temperature issue........should not be happening. Check timing, vacuum leaks, and lower hose collapse from too much suction on the pump. Also look at differential from top to bottom of radiator. I lost an engine recently with a radiator core that was new but only flowed 30 percent of factory. New core does NOT mean it’s right. A five gas machine is great when tuning if you can borrow one. I understand the time issue.....doesn’t let it push you in a corner. Lots of fantastic progress so far. Some thing are impossible to accomplish on a tight deadline......doing Pebble restorations makes you miserable.......been there and done that. Experienced collectors all have missed target dates, and as time goes on, outside suppliers make everything ten times harder. Most importantly it’s not in the car so everything is ten times easier to deal with now.........pat yourself on the back for doing it right.....even if you miss the deadline.........it’s all easy from here on out.
    14 points
  9. Tonight went a lot better than last night. It was my goal to have it ready to fire tomorrow so I could hit the button with my mechanic, Roman, there as back-up, but I didn't quite get that far. Every job is a little bigger than you expect and takes a little longer. I did, however, install the water pump which consumed most of my time. It's a little more complex than just bolting it onto the engine. First up, I had to make a passage for the lower radiator hose--I built my engine stand without taking this into consideration so I had to improvise. I just took a hole saw and blew a 4-inch hole in the 4x6 that makes the foundation of the stand. Good enough (or not, but I'll get to that). Drilled a 4-inch hole for the lower radiator hose. Not pretty, but it'll work. Next I had to modify the rag joint between the water pump and the generator--it was slightly too large to fit inside the water pump housing. As I did with the engine mounts, I chucked the discs into my drill press and carved them down to size with a cut-off wheel. Messy and stinky, but effective. It was a bit of a wrestling match to get the rag joint bolted to the water pump shaft (also requiring a trip to the hardware store for some longer bolts), but eventually I got it. Then I loosely bolted the water pump to the back of the generator, and again, it took some finesse to get them to mate up properly. The water pump shaft fits inside the generator shaft for support (in fact, it's the only support for the water pump shaft except for the packing and the bushing in the back cover), and it was a bit of a trick to get them to connect and get the bolts through the rag joint and into the generator shaft bracket. I was only able to get three of the four bolts in there--I need to turn the engine over to reach the fourth one so I'll wait until it has some oil in it and we're confident in hitting the starter. Three out of four bolts are in the rag joint. Fourth will need the engine to be turned over so I can reach it. Then I tightened all the mounting bolts. Installed the water manifold and tightened the end nut on the water pump shaft. Then I filled the grease cup with Lubriplate 115 water pump grease. My plan was to fill it with fluids and see if it leaked overnight, but unfortunately the lower hose didn't quite fit even with my amazing hole-drilling. I'll need to make a slightly longer hose that will bend a bit--that's OK, I have three feet of the 2.5-inch lower hose on the shelf for just such an emergency. I'll do that tomorrow. The lower hose's angle isn't quite right so I'll need to replace it with a slightly longer version. It'll work, I'm sure. I did, however fill it with oil. This sucker takes three gallons of oil, so I bought the cheapest 5W30 I could find--about $1.25/quart. The plan is to run the thin oil for about 15 minutes, then drain it and have a look to see if there's any metal shavings in it. Then we'll refill it with something more suitable, either a 10W40 or a 20W50 for longer-term running and testing. The good news is that my brass float and the oil level indicator work perfectly. At least the oil level indicator works perfectly. I didn't screw that up. Tomorrow we'll get that lower radiator hose hooked up, the last two oil lines to the water pump connected, and we'll see what happens... Will it run? Will it blow up? Will something expensive break? Who knows? And check out my mini gas tank, which should hold enough gas for this efficient engine to run for, oh, about 37 seconds.
    14 points
  10. Back home. 2705 miles total at 16 mpg overall. Used 1 qt of oil and one pint to tranny fluid. It was difficult getting used to the harsher ride of the wife's 2008 Marquis and my 97 F150. i said it in my earlier post...that Buick is a fantastic car! Easy riding and easy to drive as any modern car. If interested ask about the (few) modification the made it this way. Great show to get together with old and new friends. Thanks to Brian DePouli and the AACA for a great time. After attending a successful show, I still don't understand the BCA cancellations .
    14 points
  11. If at all possible, I recommend you find a way to get there to see it yourself. Inspectors don't do any of the thing you hope they will do and they certainly aren't experts on anything automotive. I guarantee you know more than any inspector about whatever car you're looking at. Spend the money on a plane ticket to go yourself rather than hoping some amateur will give you any kind of useful feedback.
    14 points
  12. Hi everyone, I’m 26 and I wonder if there are people’s my age in this community? I guess I would fall into the minority. Anyway, this passion is real and although I’m quite new to this forum, I'm still hoping that I can learn and share my knowledge with you all. Cheers!
    13 points
  13. My 1941 Buick Series-A Special Business Coupe has been a fabulous purchase as it was in excellent condition all-round and has only required normal maintenance (see last photo below from the day of purchase). I have been able to personalize the car to make it my own also. I’ve grown to appreciate the fat-fender cars from the mid-1930’s through to the late 1940’s as they capture the late Art Deco styling well. Adding numerous accessories from the period enhances the look of these cars. In nearly 3yrs of ownership, I’ve achieved quite a lot. In 2yrs & 8 months, I’ve driven the car 8,500 miles (13,680km) which averages 60miles (96km) per week on average. I was surprised when I made this calculation. I’ve also removed the following incorrect items & replaced them with the correct parts from the US; Removed Replacement · 1980’s Ford interior rear-vision mirror GM mirror (reproduction) · Late 1970’s Holden exterior rear-vision mirrors GM mirrors (reproduction) · Aftermarket reverse/back-up light GM unit (genuine original) · English Notek ‘Fog Master’ Fog-lights Guide 859-C (genuine original) · Spot-lights mounted off the side of the hood No spot-lights fitted · Front (only) original hubcaps Rare after-market 1950’s Lyon hubcaps I’ve also made the following additions to the car; · Rear fender skirts handmade by a friend · Lowered the car 3.5” (rear) and 1.5” (front) · Genuine original Fulton series 800 visor I have also recently been very fortunate to snap up a 1947 Buick Deluxe steering wheel (see photo) out of Sydney on an Australian Buick Parts Facebook page for a very reasonable price (couldn’t believe my luck). It’s in very good condition, but I will get the rim ‘plastic’ recast. Fortunately, I’ve found 2 such places in Australia who do this work and both come highly recommended. My Buick has the simple 3-spoke (non-banjo) wheel in good shape, but it’s very plain and somewhat boring especially in black. I’ve also wanted to get my dash back to being wood-grained (as it should be). Fortunately, I have a friend who can do this (he’s done nice work on several cars). The engine-turning on the glove box lid and instrument panel however is my main challenge, but we’re working on ideas for this. The original upholstery in the car was Tan & Grey Bedford Cord (Trim Code 900), but when the car was purchased by an Australian in Waco TX in 1989 and imported to Australia, it had a Bedford Cord interior that appears (from photos I have) to be very light tan. However, I recently took my seat base to my trimmer to see he could make adjustments as I sit too high in the car and the seat is quite firm. He discovered underneath the leather there is several layers of ‘packing’ on top of a Tan & Grey Bedford Cord (see photo), but none of the light tan cloth from the 30yo photo was in sight. I can only conclude the car had been recovered in a light tan Bedford Cord over the top of the original Tan & Grey Bedford Cord before it left the USA, then when it reupholstered in leather by the 2nd Australian owner, the light tan Bedford Cord was removed (and not the Tan & Grey original) before being covered with leather. I have always admired the cozy look of the nice Bedford Cord interiors (rare in Australia), so I now was starting to think – could this be my excuse to get a Bedford Cord interior? I decided to email SMS Auto Fabrics (Oregon) with the trim code, description and a photo of my cloth. They replied 1 day later saying “I have that stuff. I’ll mail you a sample.” I was amazed! Now that I have the opportunity to obtain the correct Bedford Cord to have my car re-upholstered in, along with a Deluxe steering wheel and wood-grained dash, I am very excited as this will totally transform the interior of my car giving the driving experience a very special feel indeed. Meanwhile, I will keep putting miles on the old girl while I make my preparations. We are currently in Winter here in Australia (June-August) so this will probably not happen for another 12 months at the earliest. Below: as the car looks today. Below: as the car looks today. Below: my recently acquired 1947 Steering wheel (it will have a new '41 horn button fitted) Below: my original Tan & Grey Bedford Cord (Trim Code 900) Below: The day I purchased & collected the car in September 2018 (in Melbourne).
    13 points
  14. Not thrilled with the oil pressure here (and it drops to 0 on the gauge at idle), but there are several factors at play. One is that the gauge probably isn't great. Two is that I'm running 5W30 oil, which is very thin for one of these engines. And three, I may have to tweak the relief valve on the water pump a bit, it may not be making full pressure. But 20 PSI at what feels like 1500 RPM (I forgot to install my tach) is OK and the valvetrain is quiet. If it was really at 0 PSI, we'd hear it clattering. A few more runs and then we'll switch 20W50 oil and that should bolster oil pressure a bit. But it runs and it didn't explode!
    13 points
  15. Craig, and Bill Harrah tried his best to do that - restore them all. Many he did . He was not unrealistic, had his own shop as well as others working on many cars at one time and I feel both Bill and Austin Clark never really got/get the due credit for saving so many cars that people now have, see and enjoy. A friend just e mailed me that he saw a car for sale by a dealer who proudly proclaimed it was from the "Harris "collection. Must be a really serious well versed dealer to know who Harris was - I never heard of him , only guy I ever heard of was a band leader Phil Harris who was married to actress Alice Faye. Bill Harrah was a close friend, we exchanged Christmas cards for years and spend a week each summer together hanging out and driving around in Franklins at the annual Franklin Club trek ( meet) near Syracuse, NY. He even brought his two adopted sons to the trek , they liked to climb trees better then ride in the cars! Until I was able to get my own Franklin to the trek I was loaned a Franklin that Bill had brought there ( he usually brought 3 or 4 cars every year) for the week. He and I also would walk around the flea market at Hershey together looking for stuff and at cars. His enthusiasm for cars matched everyone here who loves old cars and trucks, he was like a little kid ( who was 6 feet 4 inches tall) at Christmas if he found something he didn't have and wanted to share his "find" with friends. I have way to many stories and memories, thanks for taking the time to read this everyone. Walt
    13 points
  16. Detailed writeup of the trip - enjoy! Prologue I bought my 1940 Buick Super 56S back in 2012. It had a whole host of issues, most of which I have described previously in many threads on the Pre-War forum. Finally, around 2017 I started to consider the Buick to be fully reliable and started to take it on day trips. Of course, it still needed little things fixed as well as periodic maintenance, but overall I really started to "groove" (the teenagers call it "vibing") driving it, and 2 years ago started to think maybe a longer trip was in order. I had been saying for quite some time that I thought it could go to California, and perhaps it was time to put the Buick where my mouth was! Naturally, COVID dashed any plans for last summer so I concentrated on getting my '38 66S finished. Finally, this year seemed to be "the moment" and I planned to drive the '40 to the Strongsville BCA National. The next issue was a travelling companion. My wife is partially disabled and it is getting difficult for her to do road trips, especially in an 80-year-old non-air-conditioned car in the middle of the summer, so that idea was out. My next thought naturally fell to 16-year-old Ben, a neighbor's son and my intrepid assistant, protege, and friend. He is very interested in old cars and has been working closely with me since he was 10 years old. Since he has been involved with every repair on the car for the last 5 years and we get along very well he would be perfect for the trip. Of course, he was perhaps a bit less enthusiastic considering the no AC angle but promising some driving time (he has a learner's permit), some first-class food, and especially control of the music I talked him into it. As planning was underway word was passed that both meets were cancelled. I gave brief thought to trying for the substitute meet at Auburn but decided it was a bridge too far. So, I started looking around for somewhere to go about the same distance from home as Strongsville. Finally, I settled on Charlotte since it has the Mustang Museum (Ben recently acquired a '65) and the NASCAR museum. And no big mountains to cross! We settled on July 5 to July 10 and appropriate reservations were made. I started in with final preparations on the car, getting all of the periodics taken care of. I put Diamondback Auburn Wide Whitewalls on it last year and it cruises pretty well. In mid-June, I ran it up to Hershey PA for the day as a final test. Over 200 miles and it did fine. As the departure date approached, I started getting "stuff" together. I made a pretty comprehensive list of parts, tools, and consumables to take. Personal items were mostly an afterthought, although I did pick up a Sharper Image seat that circulates the air underneath of you. It worked pretty well and later I was very glad I had gotten it. By the night of July 4, I was all packed. The car stuff took up the entire trunk leaving the tiny back seat for our clothes and other things. One item I thankfully did take was an old large period-correct thermos jug I got on eBay which we kept filled with ice water. That was one of the most-appreciated things we took with us. A family emergency delayed our departure one day but finally we were ready to leave the morning of July 6. The weather called for low 90's and humidity. The forecast appeared to say that the first day would be the worst, and that we would be into lower temperatures the remaining days. How wrong they were! Day 1 July 7 2021 We left Rockville MD at 10:35 am, all windows and vents open and the JBL speaker pounding out some recent rap-or-other. We went out MD 28 towards Point of Rocks MD to cross the Potomac into Virginia. The plan was US roads and to avoid Interstates. Finally, we went across the bridge and headed down US 15 around Leesburg and to the south. The heat was bad but we managed by keeping the inside of the car like a wind tunnel. Lost a few bits of trash out the windows too. We continued south past Haymarket, Warrenton, and Culpeper, stopping at Orange VA to gas up and get some lunch. We were trying to avoid chains so we found a Mexican place that met our Basic Requirements: air conditioned, lots of ice water, and edible food. Afterward we continued down US 15 past many small towns, getting on US 360 at Wylliesburg and picking up US 501 at South Boston. These last two, unlike much of US 15 here in Virginia, are 4 lane roads and we were able to pick up the pace a bit. Finally, we arrived in Roxboro, NC by continuing on US 501, arriving at 6:15 pm, having driven 285 miles. For dinner we found a small bar and grill in town that met the requirements above, plus cold beer! The AC in our rooms were cranked down and, tired and wind-burned, we slept like the dead. The Buick ran absolutely flawlessly. Nary a cough or stumble. The engine temperature stayed remarkably steady, usually at about 170 to 180 degrees, rising to about 190 while crawling through the small towns. In these conditions my auxiliary fan would kick in and the temperature would stay steady, even under the terrific heat. Oil pressure was a solid 45 lbs at 55 mph. The car liked 50 to 55 mph, but could easily do 60 mph in a pinch, although I don't like to keep it there when it's this hot. The brakes are outstanding since I swapped the front shoes the week before we left, and the cars tracks about as expected for a car of this age - in other words you have to stay on top of it but it doesn't wander on its own. Day 2 July 8 2021 During the night the remains of Tropical Storm Elsa rolled in. We awoke to rain and much cooler temperatures. Gas was obtained and about 1 pint of oil was needed to top off the stick. We rolled out at 10:55 am and proceeded to NC 49, a 2-lane road. It was raining pretty good so I started up the vacuum wipers which worked well - at least at first. Since it was cool there was no worry about overheating, either us or the car. However, we were constantly readjusting vent wings and windows to minimize water ingress, kind of like a window crank ballet. There was a fair bit coming in through the cowl vent but we just put one of the several beach towels that I had brought underneath it. Lunch was on-the-run and I was steering and running through the gears with a cheeseburger hanging out of my mouth! We rode NC 49 down to Burlington, more-or-less bypassing it through Graham and going through Liberty, Asheboro, Richfield and finally into Concord. We went up US 601 from NC 49 to I85 and then to our motel. Arrival time was 2:30 pm and we drove 137 miles. The only issue was that the wipers were beginning to lag a little after several hours of operation with v-e-r-y s-l-o-w wiping with significant pedal. I had assumed the booster on the dual action fuel pump would have handled that but maybe something is amiss, will check on return. First thing we did after arrival was to visit the Mustang Museum in Concord. There are plenty of examples to satisfy any Mustang fan. Almost all of their exhibits are loaned from collectors, so the collection changes about every six months. I would guess there were about 40 or more cars on display when we were there. At the suggestion of Brian DePouli, we went to the Midwood Smokehouse for dinner. This was the best meal of the trip. Lots of good brisket, pulled pork, and ribs. It was a trek from the motel but definitely worth it! Day 3 July 9 2021 We stayed around Charlotte today. We went to the NASCAR Hall of Fame downtown. They do a pretty good job and I highly recommend it. Afterward we went to see Brian DePouli. He has a beautiful '69 Charger that Ben was drooling over. To tell the truth, I was drooling a bit as well! Dinner was an Italian restaurant that met the Basic Requirements from Day 1. They all can't be gems! Day 4 July 10 2021 Considering how well the Buick was running, I made the decision to utilize 4 lane roads for the trip back. Some Interstate, but mostly US roads. The chosen route was I85 up to Business 85, then US 29 to US 15 in Culpeper, VA and then home using the Point of Rocks bridge and MD 28. We started at 11:15 am. The weather was supposed to be hot but it actually wasn't too bad early in the day. The wind tunnel was appropriately set, classic rock blasting, and we were on our way. We went through Salisbury, Lexington, and around the eastern side of Greensboro. Once the Interstate was behind us, we felt a little safer with fewer trucks blasting around our humble 55 mph pace. After we went by Reidsville and approached Virginia the outside temperature went from Hot to Roast. We dragged into Danville VA for gas and ate inside in a Chick-Fil-A for a nice air-conditioned break. Then back to the hot asphalt, going through the improbably-named Tightsqueeze, Altavista, and around Lynchburg. Frankly, the 4-lane road, even non-Interstate, was more boring than the varied NC 49, but with the heat neither of us was interested in adding more time to the trip by this point. We continued on past Amherst to Charlottesville with Ben driving the last hour. Arrival time was 5:10 pm with 250 miles driven. As per usual the Buick ran flawlessly. Dinner this time was a bit of a treat at the Aberdeen Barn, with outstanding steaks. Once again, we retired to our rooms with the AC set on Arctic. Day 5 July 11 2021 Since we didn't have that far to travel today, Ben was understandably starting to go into Get-Home-Itis mode, and frankly I was starting to feel the same. Unfortunately, the temperature was at Roast on our departure, soon increasing to Blast. Note to self: next time do this in the Fall. Ben had run through all of his playlists by this time so the music took on a more random character. Leaving Charlottesville at 11:15 am after adding another pint of oil, the miles sort-of flew by and before too long we had passed Culpeper, Warrenton where we gassed up again, and Leesburg. Lunch was McDonalds eaten on the move. Soon we crossed the Point of Rocks bridge and it was downhill from there. After flying down MD 28 I dropped off Ben at his house at 3:15 pm, and arriving at mine about a minute later. 145 miles for the final leg, and 957 miles grand total for the trip. So ended the Great 1940 Buick Road Trip Summer 2021 Epilogue Most people are at least aware of the classic Road Trip stories, such as On the Road by Kerouac, Blue Highways by Least Heat Moon, and one of my favorites, Travels with Charley by Steinbeck. Obviously, this trip was not one of those. Appropriately, though, Steinbeck wrote, "A trip, a safari, an exploration, is an entity, different from all other journeys. It has personality, temperament, individuality, uniqueness. A journey is a person in itself; no two are alike. And all plans, safeguards, policing, and coercion are fruitless. We find after years of struggle that we do not take a trip, a trip takes us." Like Steinbeck, I was not sure when we started if this was going to end up being a story of overcoming adversity, of finding and fixing problems as they crop up on these old cars. I do find those interesting to read although I imagine they are not as fun to experience. Fortunately, that did not happen to us. In fact, out of all of the car stuff that I had packed, we only ended up using the tire gauge, oil, rags, and a funnel. So our story is more simply about the journey itself, a journey in an 80-year-old Buick and putting ourselves in a place to re-live a trip as it would have happened many decades ago, before powerful engines, power steering, and air conditioning. But I had plenty of time to think as the wind roared around us and prevented most conversation. Even the music could not be clearly heard. The primary reason I wanted to do this before we set out was to challenge the Buick, in effect to validate my faith in the car and all of the time, effort, and money I had put into it. And by validating my faith in the car I was validating my faith in myself and what I could do, turning a poorly running car into a finely running machine that reflected the skill and imagination of its designers and makers even many years later. And I think that I fully accomplished this. But what was also clear as we rolled along was acknowledging and understanding all of the comments, thumbs up, horn honks of recognition, and outright appreciation of the Buick's very existence by the folks we encountered, at gas stations, fast food joints, hotels, and other places where travelers gather. These people were of all ages, races, and outlooks. Although making any sweeping generalizations is not possible over such a short journey, it's clear at least in a micro sense that there are things that transcend differences, that the sight of an old car ploughing down the highway brings out a certain feeling in people, one that harkens back to the commonality and unity of the American Road. And I think that this was probably the best part of the trip.
    13 points
  17. Stats for Trip Day 1 July 7 Start Rockville MD 10:35 am Stop Roxboro NC 6:15 pm 284 miles Day 2 July 8 Start Roxboro NC 10:55 am Stop Concord NC 2:30 pm 137 miles Total for outbound 421 miles Day 3 July 9 In Charlotte area Day 4 July 10 Start Concord NC 11:15 am Stop Charlottesville VA 5:10 pm 250 miles Day 5 July 11 Start Charlottesville VA 11:15 am Stop Rockville MD 3:15 pm 145 miles Total for inbound 395 miles Both legs total 816 miles Trip total 957 miles Mileage average 13.9 mpg Oil usage 1 quart over 1000 mi No addl coolant needed Tires maintained 32 psi no air needed No other maintenance required
    13 points
  18. Obituary for William Maxwell Davis William Maxwell Davis, age 89, died peacefully at his home in Charleston, WV on July 2, 2021. Mr. Davis was born in Charleston, WV on March 21, 1932, the son of the late James Hornor Davis II and the late Martha Davis. He was preceded in death by his only brother, James Hornor Davis III, his sister-in-law Ouida Caldwell Davis, and his step-mother Eolyne Davis. He was the last of the eleven grandchildren of William Brent Maxwell of Harrison County WV. He received his early education in Clarksburg and Charleston public schools and was a graduate of the Lawrenceville School, Lawrenceville, NJ and Princeton University. His entire business career was spent with the Bank of West Virginia, where he stepped down as President in 1979. He was a world traveler, and some of his earliest trips included the World’s Fair in 1939 and the opening of the Olympic Games in Helsinki. He also served overseas in the U.S. Army. He twice served as the head of the West Virginia Commission on the Arts, appointed by the governor in 1968 a year after the commission’s founding; he remained on through 2004. He also served on the foundation board of the Kanawha County Public Library, and was eager to see the renovation through, which he hoped would be quite welcoming to all. His vast philanthropic interests included the Clay Center for Arts and Education (formerly Sunrise Museums), various music organizations - Chamber Music and WV Symphony , the University of Charleston of which he once served as acting President , The Historic Glenwood House Foundation for which he was serving his 41st year as President, WVU, his schools Princeton and Lawrenceville and many auto related museums and his church. Retiring early from his banking career, he dedicated much time to serving on the boards of various non profits across a broad array of interests throughout his state and the country. A passionate automobile enthusiast from his very early days -he often recalled childhood events (and throughout his life) by the car that was involved. He was also among memberships and roles in a dozen different auto clubs, especially active with the Classic Car Club, the Classic Car Club of America Museum, and the Rolls Royce Owners Club and Foundation and served as national president of all and judged the Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance for over thirty years. He was the oldest continuous American member of the UK based 20-Ghost Club the oldest Rolls Royce auto club in the world and his cars often won best in class. An especially memorable event among many was his delight in taking an American built 1928 Rolls Royce Springfield (MA) roadster with left hand drive to England for a tour- creating some sensation on both continents, including New York Times photo coverage of it boarding the QEII for his Atlantic crossing. Mr. Davis is survived by his nephew, James Hornor Davis IV (William Hague) ; his niece, Frederica Davis; his 5 great nieces—Frederica Morgan Davis, Faith Maxwell Davis Iselin (Alex) , Tilden Davis Arnold (Alex) , Warren Davis, and Baird Davis. He was predeceased by his nephew, Lewis Caldwell Davis. He cherished his ongoing contact with Caldwell’s longtime partner Beth Secor. He took great pride in them and their generations. He will be remembered for his great charm, and for his genuine devotion to West Virginia, his community, and his family—and for his bowties. In Charleston WV, Visitation will be from 4 – 6 pm on Wednesday, July 7 at the Bollingers Funeral Home 420 Lee Street West. The Memorial Service will be at 1pm, July 8 at St. Matthew’s Church., 36 Norwood Road, Charleston, WV Persons desiring to make memorials should make them to the charity of their choice Bill is one of the most special people I have come across in my life. Resplendent with is horned rimmed glasses, ever present bowtie, sport coat and straw hat, he cut a picture right out of the past. He was a car guy through and through but a much better human being than I could ever aspire to be. He will be missed by many who also had a great relationship with him but I know my world is a little darker now as we had some plans at "Hershey" this year.
    13 points
  19. No worries, they'll be in our shoes someday. You were kinder than I'd have been for sure. I've gotten entirely too quick to tell someone to do anatomically impossible things... I was out on the Olds wagon a few years back and ran up on a broken Honda. I knew two of the boys and always kept tools in that car, so stopped to offer help. The Honda's owner was a pint-sized jerk, to be kind, and quickly told me he'd handle it because I couldn't possibly know anything about high-performance cars. Said OK, the tools are in the car if you need them. His buds were about to pee themselves trying not to laugh. As I walked away heard one of them ask Honda boy if he had any drag racing track records. "No why?" "He does. Reckon he knows anything about a high-performance car?" and then the two of them lost it and Honda boy's jaw hit the pavement. Age and treachery...
    13 points
  20. Our local BCA chapter was invited to attend a town car show in Los Altos Hills yesterday. Buicks were well-represented.
    12 points
  21. Matt, Don't let it beat you up. I know it's easy for us to say that and we didn't put all the money and time that you have put into it. You have had your hands all over that engine and the two things that are giving you trouble are the two things that weren't rebuilt. I know it's hard to walk away from something that is not working as you expected after you put your heart and soul into it and it should just work. Take a step back and have a breather for a minute and go back to it later. It will still be there and getting mad and destroying it doesn't solve anything, but throwing away your hard earned money and time. Your close, don't give up. Were all rooting for you Matt.
    12 points
  22. The above video, is the only correct way to deal with an engine that has had all the work done to it that Matt did. Everything else is a half assed shortcut. I applaud Matt for spending the extra time and money to do it right......it will pay off twenty five times over when the car is done. Bravo Matt, and three thumbs up. 👍👍👍 I'm impressed!
    12 points
  23. Old cars get stage fright. It's a fact. Happens to me all the time and it's frustrating as hell.
    12 points
  24. New upgraded project. We will list these for sale in the approprite areas, but I though they would be an interesting example of what a five axis machine can do. These are made from solid bars. Every surface is machined 100 percent. They are Purolater replacement oil filters that take a spin on cartridge and can be used over and over. Replacement cartridge filters are 4 dollars each. They are an exact replica. Even better than the ones we did in the past. Enjoy, Ed.
    12 points
  25. I have seen this, and I have seen the absolute opposite of it. Keep being friendly to the kids. At 41 years old I am still a young guy in the antique car hobby… but I have been in it since I was a fetus! I recall countless tours where the closest person to my age was my father that brought me there… I have seen this change. I have been treated like an asset and a future of the hobby and as a dumb kid that should be playing a video game instead of trying to play with the grown ups. I ‘barely’ recall the “old” guys on a PATC tour getting me incoherently drunk in the hospitality room the summer I got my drivers license… and then letting me drive their cars the next day… cars I will never in my life be able to afford. There is a neighborhood kid that has been a shadow in my fathers garage for years, taking an interest in old cars. He got himself an old DeSoto that he drives regularly. A couple of days ago he stopped by my parents house while I happened to be there visiting and I offered him a ride in the 15 Dodge Brothers that just came to me. For about six blocks I explained what I was doing and how to operate the car and then I pulled over, got out from behind the wheel, and had him take us home. He did great! I am fairly sure that when I am my fathers age I know of at least one guy that will me touring with me!
    12 points
  26. I already transported a couple VW’s for Jayson from Southern California to the Seattle area: Jayson had a hard time lining up either a moving company or a rental truck or trailer to move some other things … So I obliged - he did the packing with friends ✅ I just opened the side door to check how things were and found there had been an incident … ( check the lower left of the image ) Luckily there were no injuries and only minor damage to the vehicle …. 🤔 Jim
    12 points
  27. Drove our 1921 Franklin in yesterday's 4th of July parade in Round Rock, Texas. Lots of hometown floats, boy scout troops and local organizations. Great local parade. We were the only old car to participate in the parade - no Model As, Ts or even the Miata club. Can't understand why. If our 100-year-old car can make it, why can't the others? I remember back in the old days in San Diego, how the local AACA would send at least a dozen cars to the parades in each area. But we had fun. Must have honked the Klaxon horn several hundred times.
    12 points
  28. Finally on the home stretch with help from my friends, including help and advice from great people on this forum. I thought I would share my story with you all. I grew up on a farm that had a lot of old machinery. I loved all things mechanical and In 1971 when I was twelve years old I decided to “restore” a 1936 GMC 1/2 ton pickup. This pickup had sat since 1956 , it was complete except for the front axle that was borrowed for a trailer project. Sin number one, never tear something completely apart, especially when you have no skills or a plan. Sin number two, do not tear apart a vehicle that is in good original condition without A proper evaluation . in the summer of 1971 I took this nice old pickup and completely disassembled it , thank goodness I did not grind all the rivets off the frame. Not knowing what to do I asked around for advice , some said hot rod others said why in the heck did you go and do that for. I was fortunate to know a pretty good machinist who said , son start by evaluating components and then make up a list of parts that you will need, meanwhile start to develop skill on the simple stuff first. Of course I had school and chores , years fly by . The one good thing that happened is I learned to work on old hit and miss engines. Actually restored a couple of them and learned how great it is to complete a project, if I only learned that lesson first (before sin number 1). fast forward a decade , finally got the engine evaluated and the engine block was not usable I then spent many years trying to find a original style engine. In 1936 when GMC introduced their first light duty pickup they wanted it to have a pressure oil system. They chose Oldsmobiles 213 cu flathead six with a few differences like different motor mounts, distributor, water pump, clutch ect. To me the most important thing to have in this truck was the proper letter and number sequence on the engine block, GMC used the letter T to begin the serial number. Another decade latter I finally found a complete engine 2,500 miles from me. I bought the motor and had it shipped to me, I sent it out to be rebuilt at a very busy machine shop, I continued to put pressure on them to get it done , secretly hoping that did not get it done too fast as I was always short on time and money , you know, got married, bought a house, had a kid, got divorced repeat, as some say life got in the way. That takes us to decade four. The machine shop calls and says pickup your motor, I was thrilled until I learned that they did not finish it. The owners decided to retire, however they said that all the machining was completed and the engine only needed to be assembled, they even gifted all the labor as they felt bad. Fortunately I had become good friends with a nice young man who has a restoration shop near me , he specializes in pre world war classics , does Packard’s, Pierce Arrow and many other engine complete overhauls. I took the engine to him and within a few weeks he called me with the bad news, the engine that had sat all those years at the previous machine shop and had all the work done on it was never magnafluxed . It had water jacket cracks inside the block were the side valve chambers are. I started my search again, like trying to find a needle in a haystack, in 1936 GMC only built 12,000 trucks with this engine. I reached out to some new found friends that I met on this site along with the VCCA and someone remembered a guy who dropped a small block in his truck, I was able to buy it as is, so until it made it to my friends restoration shop I had no idea if it was rebuildable, thank goodness it was. Anyway the engine has been on the test stand and runs great, truck is pretty much back together, just waiting for the new radiator core to be installed . Not sure how many pictures I can include on a single post so I will start with a representative photo of the beginning and one near completion, moral of the story is, it took me 50 years but you can sometimes Make up for the sins of your youth, Michael
    11 points
  29. Working on bringing my recently purchased car home.
    11 points
  30. Theres a slightly off topic (hot rod) 1937 Plymouth coupe i am doing some metal repairs on for someone, thats keeping me busy, but i managed to get a few things done so i can bring the seats home and out of harms way with all of the other metal work going on. The seats were mostly complete, but one of the bottoms, was missing the handle/ leg support that actuates a latch to lock the seats into the buckets. The seller didnt think he had them, and never contacted me to say other wise, and i figured the likelihood of finding one was pretty slim so i started to cobble one together! Starting with some 304 stainless 1/4" rod, and a little chunk of 304 1/4" plate, stainless so that it could eventually be polished up. 20210614_180242 by Dan Haas, on Flickr 20210704_184403 by Dan Haas, on Flickr Eventually had a shape to somewhat match the toothed head to move the latch mechanism 20210704_202903 by Dan Haas, on Flickr Tig welded with 308L rod to the 1/4" rod and sanded down a bit, i left some of this stuff a little rough so there was enough material when i go to sand it down and polish everything. 20210704_205911 by Dan Haas, on Flickr For the bracket, i found a piece of .5 x 1.5 x .125 304 stainless rectangular tubing since i didnt think i would be too successful in replicating such a tight bend with the material thickness. 20210717_111328 by Dan Haas, on Flickr 20210717_111400 by Dan Haas, on Flickr A few layers of tape over the original bracket provided a little template 20210717_113657 by Dan Haas, on Flickr 20210717_114247 by Dan Haas, on Flickr 20210717_114526 by Dan Haas, on Flickr A few die grinders, files, some heat, a hammer and a vise later, i had this 20210717_123836 by Dan Haas, on Flickr 20210717_141614 by Dan Haas, on Flickr Originally, the handle was riveted to the bracket, so i'll either rivet it, or find some 'not so out of place' looking hardware keep the handle in place, so that it is removable if the need ever arises, and i wont have to cut a rivet out. 20210717_141657 by Dan Haas, on Flickr 20210717_142720 by Dan Haas, on Flickr (Ignore the flash rust on the new floor, it gets awfully hot and sweaty in there setting the seats up!) 20210717_144204 by Dan Haas, on Flickr I think whats left is to make the rear tab brackets for the seat buckets to secure them to the car floor, make some sort of pad or puck to reinforce the floor where the seat handle/ stand will sit, and figure out how/ where the side cushions secure to under the rear quarter windows. 20210717_144034 by Dan Haas, on Flickr
    11 points
  31. This will be an ongoing blog about a trip that I am taking going from Rockville MD to Charlotte NC and return. Leaving on 6 July. Likely return 10 July. I decided since that National got cancelled I would make to trip anyway! There are some car museums there, but I really wanted to see how the car will do on a long distance run. I will post comments and pics, hopefully near real time. First post will be on 5 July about the prep for the trip. Cheers, Dave
    11 points
  32. At 51 I'm still one of the younger people in the hobby. Melanie and I are very active--she organizes and manages the oldest car show in the country each Father's Day with 450+ cars, I create the magazine, I've been director of the region, we organize tours and host events at our shop, including a cruise-in every Friday and a large show in July. Nevertheless, at the Father's Day show, one of the older members flat out said to me as she was gossiping with three other people who were supposed to be helping to park cars, "You young people need to learn to pull your weight. You don't do enough for the club." At that moment, I almost told her to cram it and quit everything. It was unbelievably insulting. Biatch, where do you think this club would be right now without me and Melanie? You'd still be trying to mail entry forms to people who have been dead for a decade, having half-blind octogenarians look for people's name in a box of envelopes while radiators steamed waiting 45 minutes to get into the show, and publishing a magazine that was mimeographed and stapled together at the corners full of black and white photos scotch taped to the page. Things are so good for them these days that they don't even notice, but they act like it was their work who got them there. Pffft. Holy crap was I angry.
    11 points
  33. Went to our local car show last night when a friend said hey check out the old tow truck coming in! The truck turned out to be a 1937 dodge wrecker that I had lusted after since I was a teenager The Dodge dealer had it since it was new I was after it for years I used to play in it when I young when I got my driver license I would drive there and beg the old man to sell it to me this guy got rid of nothing cars he took in trade in the 40s through the 70s when the place finally closed His son tried to keep the place afloat by using it as a jiffy lube and eventually the town started to get on him about all the old cars laying around and they just started hauling cars out so I said please please if you won’t sell the tow truck at least can we push it inside to preserve it! There it sat for many years it disappeared and the beautiful Art Deco building was torn down . The man who owns it now has an industrial pipe company and he plans on preserving it lovely
    11 points
  34. I’m waiting on the parts to come back from powder so thought I’d work on a small project I’ve been wanting to try doing. As most know, our old cars don’t have great rear view mirrors available for most of us and the reproduction side mount mirrors leave a lot to be desired. The closed cars have better options with the door edge and hinge pin type mirrors but those of us with cabriolet and other open models don’t have many options. My idea was to come up with a mount that could fasten under the windshield pivot knob and be easily installed/removed when needed. I machined up a block of aluminum making an interlocking design that would mesh with the windshield post stops. I had purchased a couple mirrors off of eBay and just removed the door edge clips from the post. I used a socket cap screw up through the bottom of the block to secure the mirror post to the block. Once I was done and sanded the edges round, a trip across the yard to my neighbors shop for a quick polish. Now to make the drivers side. I might have a few pairs made up at the machine shop on their CNC machine, purchase the mirrors and offer them for sale on eBay.
    11 points
  35. Again I post my favorite CARtoon:
    11 points
  36. Waiting in line to add a few miles of range! Joan and I just had our 1911 Stanley at a steam car tour in Massachusetts. Great people, fun roads. We even got to drive a few laps on a road race course, and climbed Dead Horse Hill in Worcester. Daily runs were on the order of 45 to 80 miles. Steam tours have designated water stops, where there's a hose available. Most hoses don't put out huge flows of water, and most Stanleys' water consumption is about a mile a gallon. So the waits started to look like those at electric car charging stations on a holiday weekend! Fortunately, no one on the tour was in anything resembling a hurry.
    11 points
  37. I have a small economy car to get back and forth to work. A 2006 Mazda 3 hatchback wagon. Cheap reliable transportation. Earlier this summer we broke all time high temperature records when we hit over 120F. One day I was driving my little Mazda thinking how spoiled I am to have A/C. The very next day it stopped blowing cold air. Oh boy was it hot. I started researching prices for all the AC stuff needed when you open up an AC system. The parts were not too bad, if the did all the labor to install the new parts at home myself. Then I was thinking I could just take it into and AC shop to be vacuumed down and charged back up again. I sorta failed to accept the notion of dropping the car off at a garage to get it repaired. I thought about it, as I am so very busy working on my old Mopar cars and other family vehicles. I was feeling like treating myself to a little "mechanic's rest". Maybe I'd just take this Mazda in, drop it off. Then pay the bill 2 days later and be done with it. I did not. Though I certainly was tempted. I researched the OEM shop manual to learn how to troubleshoot and test the A/C system components and switches, etc. I narrowed it down to the compressor magnet for the clutch. It was not locking on when the AC switch was pressed. I had voltage at the wire to the magnet. Yet the magnet was not activating. I found a new clutch kit on Ebay for an attractive price. I waited a month for it to arrive. (Ebay Global Shipping to Canada is brutal). I tackled the clutch kit tonight. It was not an exact fit. The new pulley was wrong. A thermal switch was incorrect. However the actual circular clutch magnet was right. An exact match. I tested the original old thermal switch. It had continuity. I figured it must work. Only 1 wire going in, though it and back out. So I chopped it up and made it work with the new clutch magnet. I practiced some soldering skills. A little butt-splicing. Some heat-shrink. I installed the old pulley over the new magnet. Clipped the wire connectoions back together. Tested. Voila! Success. The new magnet was now engaging the clutch. The compressor was compressing. I had cold air again in the cab! I drove out for ice creme in celebration, and cold air. Total cost out of my pocket: New Clutch kit on Ebay $30 USD New compressor drive belt $20 USD I am pretty confident if I had taken it in to a shop they would have told me the compressor needed to be replaced. Then when you open up the AC system you need a new condenser and receiver drier at a minimum. Then there is the refrigerant recharge fee. Then the shop labor charges. I haven't been to a garage in so long I have no idea what hour shop rates at these days. US funds $130 hr? A guess. The bill, had I taken it to the shop for the repair would have been $1500 USD easily. Stay in school kids.....Or at least get on the tools as soon as you can. If you like driving, and having some pocket money left over. Lol.
    10 points
  38. One of my most memorable rides was on the 2002 Glidden in Daytona Beach. On the ride home from St. Augustine it was a picture perfect postcard day with the top down on the Model A. Linda, my wife, was next to me with Nathan, Marty Roth's three YO grandson, in the rumble seat, the Atlantic to my left and the warm ocean air in our faces made it just one of those rides to remember. I lost Linda six years ago today so writing this now is both wonderful and difficult but it is still a good memory of a great life I have had in this wonderful hobby.
    10 points
  39. Had the Electra out last night. Lots of horses around what with the start of the racing meet at Saratoga Springs. Had the Super out tonite. Heavy humidity and clouds turned the setting sun into a bright orange ball And a short while later I stopped at one of the locks on the Mohawk River High water levels this year due to a soggy July weather pattern.
    10 points
  40. Pull up a chair, pour a wee dram of good single malt Scotch and slide back in time with me to 1973. The U.S. Navy had us stationed in Scotland, and in our spare time, we traveled many winding back roads, through small villages soaking up as much history and local flavor as we could during our three year visit there. Yes, I was collecting automobilia even back then, and small country garages in out-of-the-way places were favorite stops. What I saw was often captured in photographs. Some things I managed to bring home, but much was simply not available. On one weekend trip near Loch Ness, on a corner descending a hill, I spotted an old garage almost hidden under a highway overpass. It took a while, but we eventually found some roads leading to a small village with a single road going through. The town was ancient, and after little exploring, we followed that road to a dead-end. At that road's end was the old garage. When the newer highway was put in, the road through town was cut off and that garage became isolated along with the rest of the village. Time had also passed this old garage. It was still adorned with early porcelain signs, and demanded a closer look. An early Bowser gas pump leaned slightly and obviously had not been used in ages. As we approached the building we could see the garage door was open a crack, and someone was working inside. An elderly gentleman was working on bicycles. An old wood stove kept the chill off. After getting over his surprise seeing a "Yank" in the doorway, we struck up a conversation - first about his memories from the WWII era when American soldiers were often seen in the area. Like a lot of others of that generation, he was forever grateful for the contributions the American's made to the survival of Great Britain. Curiosity for my interest in early automobiles gave him the opportunity to let me learn the history of that old garage. His father had started the business for wagon repair and blacksmithing. By 1907 he was repairing automobiles. Glued to the wood slat back wall of the garage were the shredded remains of an old poster advertising the Scottish made Argyle automobile dating to the 1900s. He showed me where roof beams had been cut away to bring a tall limousine into the building for repairs. The place was an Aladdin's cave of discarded brass lamps, wood coils, early spoke wheels, rusting tools, and boxes of wonderful things from the teens. New unused clincher tyres (correctly spelled!) hung from pegs along the wall. I did not take photos and did not risk our new friendship by asking to buy things. My memory captured the images, the smells, and the stories that day. We had to go back, and within a few months we did that. Now too cold to work in the shop, we entered the front office. Another old wood stove warmed the small room. The shelves there contained treasures. A pile of old service manuals and owners brochures for cars like De Dion Bouton, were piled high at the end of the counter. Shelves behind the cash register had small metal strips attached to them advertising "Clincher tyres" "Carbide for Motor Lamps" and "Lodge Spark Plugs." We sat back into a couple of old chairs beside the stove and as we talked, I glanced up into the open rafters. There was some kind of old sign laying face-down across the opening and I could make out some red lettering at one end - "P&H Lamps." On this visit, I was given a small burlap sack filled with old spark plugs from the scrap bin. The owner was amazed at my interest in them. But-in the Navy, duty-stations do change, and upon learning we would soon return to the United Sates, one last visit to say goodby was necessary. We left, with just the story, some plugs, a few great memories, and a wonderful friendship. Fast forward a few years. After completing four years stationed in the Baltimore, Md area, we had a second chance to return to Scotland for another tour of duty there. It was a fantastic time, picking up where we left off with the antique car club there, seeing old friends again, and exploring. One of our first stops was a return visit to that old garage. Not much had changed except the weeds surrounding it. The old guy was still fixing bicycles for the neighborhood children. We quickly renewed our friendship and retired to that front office for a wee-dram of Scotch and another story. This time-not so good. The highway was to be reconstructed and widened. The interchange would be enlarged. The Government had bought the property and it was doomed. His home nearby would be spared, but the old garage would be demolished. Everything would be sold at auction and he insisted that I must attend. I wouldn't miss it but lamented the fact that this virtual living museum would be erased from all but our memories and a few objects that I more enjoyed seeing in their natural habitat than carrying home for my own private viewing. Without asking if I wanted anything, he remarked that he wondered why I never tried to buy things from him -like everybody else. When I told him these things belonged to the old garage, he smiled, and said he'd like me to have one thing to remember the place and our good times together. He then reached around the end of the counter, and pulled out that P & H Lamp display. He commented on the many times I'd gazed up at it, and asked questions about it and its history. He had pulled it down from the rafters dusted years of wood-stove soot off, and had it ready to give to me as my souvenir. My attempts to refuse the gift were rebuffed quickly, and as we loaded it into the car, he ran back inside and came out with a box, carefully packed with all the lamps that were on the display when he took it down. I did attend the auction and bought those great metal sign strips from the edges of the shelves, plus a few small things and some brass items. But, it is that lamp display that remains one of the neatest things in my recreated old auto parts store on the second floor of my car barn. It's my own piece of Scotland. Sometimes I'll sit in the old rocking chair up there, looking around at the old auto parts store I've created, sipping on a little single malt Scotch, enjoying the history represented there. My eyes always turn to that display though, because that old garage in Scotland is really what inspired what I have today. First photo - the lamp display Second photo shows the shelf-edge signs advertising Tyres and Acetylene Lamps. Terry
    10 points
  41. Sorry I have been having issues with pictures, but I think I figured out what I was doing wrong. Two of these pictures show some great pinstripe application, we decided to have the tailgate GMC logo hand painted instead of using the store bought decal. The other picture shows how a modern material can be easy to apply and come out great, I am referring to the brown wrinkle finish on the interior. originally the factory took the interior panels and painted them with a special paint and then baked them in a oven. The paint would wrinkle and then they would be screwed into place with clutch head screws ( I would call them one way screws, hopefully you will not experience what I went through with these). The modern solution to this ,as that paint is not available is a wrinkle finish powder coat. The material was less than $200, I took my panels to my local powder coat shop and they charged me $400. As many of you know there is no way you could sandblast and paint those pieces or upholster over them as cheap as this. Not to mention it came out perfect
    10 points
  42. Found some cool accessories while picking up a car on Friday
    10 points
  43. Got the tub in the booth, scuffed it, fixed a couple of nicks and re-cleared it. I also had to fix/re-clear the gas tank, end cap, strap and running board. That all went well and with any luck that'll be the last paint I need to do on the car. The wheels still need to be painted and there's misc black primer on some bumper pieces but that should be all the green paint and clear. I'll need to wet sand and buff but I'l probably wait a few days on that. Very excited to, hopefully, start assembling the car for the final time.
    10 points
  44. Hi, in another thread just yesterday we were talking about not having anything on your trailer to ID what’s inside. No racing stickers, no advertisement, no “team” name. I recommend placing the large sticker on the inside of the man door.......when in the parking lot it’s clearly visible, and shows support for the club. Trailers with car markings often have tools, equipment, and cars that are targeted for theft..........today a tracking device is a must for any trailer..........
    10 points
  45. Boy, are you WRONG! It's the damn smartphone that has eroded communication and socialization skills. All these iPhone users know how to do is text - they do NOT want to speak with anyone using their voices. Just ask the kids - they do NOT want to actually carry on a conversation because it can't be done with emoticons. Get it right, man.
    10 points
  46. I literally had an inspector someone paid $400 to examine a car show up and leave his car running in the parking lot--that's how little time he expected to spend examining the car. He looked at the car (a 1962 Lincoln) and asked how many cylinders the engine had. He didn't test any of the critical systems on the car, particularly the top, which he didn't ask to see in operation. On a suicide door Lincoln. Nor did he ask to put it on the lift. He did take a picture of every chip he could find in the paint and measured the depth of the tires. He didn't even ask us to fire it up. When he was leaving, I asked if he wanted to take the car for a drive with me and he said, "No, I assume the buyer will come drive it himself." At that point I told him it was HIS JOB to be the buyer's eyes and ears and forced him to take a ride with me. While we're driving, he asked me, "Is this car a manual or an automatic transmission?" AS WE ARE DRIVING. This same moron showed up just last week to look at a 1956 Ford, did a similar inspection where he didn't know how many cylinders the engine had, slammed the hell out of the hood, and only put it on the lift because we parked it there ahead of time knowing he was coming. Then he called back three hours after he left and said he had accidentally deleted all his photos from his phone and could he come back. Of course. So he came back and just took a few quick photos, did not ask to put the car back on the lift, and did not do any serious inspecting (again). The report the customer got said that we (the dealership) were unwilling to put the car on the lift or let him take a test drive. This is the pure crap that you get when you pay some inspector to go look at a car. You will not get a reasonable, informed, enlightening opinion, you will get some hack amateur guessing and taking pictures and trying to talk you out of buying it so he isn't exposed if he missed something serious. Plane ticket. Buy one. Anything else is just throwing your money away.
    10 points
  47. History doesn't stop. The cars of today have just as much relevance as the cars of 1925 (any year, actually).
    10 points
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