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  2. What really kind of funny is joe is in the picture too. You can just see his sneaker in front of the passenger rear tire on the grass!
  3. Xander I think thar's Clayton Paddisons speedster, aka mr. Model T on a few forums. I think he just hit age 40. Designed as what a depression era farm boy might have put together. Leno drove it and loved it. 🙂
  4. Welcome to the AACA forums. You would confuse people less and probably get better quicker replies if you started your own topic rather than HI-JACKING another persons thread. Good luck with you fuel pump rod .
  5. I agree totally with you guys. I would have preferred one of the women who were walking around in period dress for sure. I think that would have made a great picture.
  6. Welcome to the AACA forums SergioD . You would confuse people less and probably get better quicker replies if you started your own topic rather than HI-JACKING another persons thread. Good luck with you fuel pump rod .
  7. You can usually find belts at tractor supply. Online as well. It helps to know the dimensions rather than the application. I don't know if GM ever used serrated belts. I know we had a brand new 1988 Celebrity when I was a kid and that had normal V belts to the best of my memory. I didn't see the serrated style myself until well into the serpentine age and then they were all replacements rather than OEM. I found a patent going back to 1955 application, but that was for a toothed cog. Most of the v-belt patents with serration seem to be late 80s into the 1990s.
  8. We might really just be seeing the end of a long bubble... which isn't all bad. I mean, how much should an old mass produced expensive to maintain and hard/unsafe to use on public streets that takes up a garage space machine be worth? Car shows for years have been about car owners and car dreamers. I enjoy it, but I think my generation (36 years old) and younger folks generally aren't. Honestly AACA is in a better position than the hot rod groups I believe. I think a shift towards historic interaction could be key. Living museums with crazy curators who know a little bit too much about the exhibits and want to share it with others. We are about history not just gas guzzling, and I think given our current climate (haha) that is going to have greater appeal. The monetary value may get soft, but how does that change the value as someone who loves the car? Most of us have lost a good bit of money in the hobby. Many of us have or are restoring cars for far more money than they are worth. It doesn't phase us. We might see a few more project cars go to parts status but the cars left at this point are largely restored or in good driving status. I don't know what the split is between project cars and restored/driving cars of a given range, but I'd bet we're close to more being on the road than in a field for many of them.
  9. Well that's a BIG plus for sure. If I was in the mood for a project, this would be pretty attractive. Good luck Steve
  10. hddennis

    Timing Engine

    I put silicone on all the bolts and gaskets when I did this 6 months ago but still have oil leakage from somewhere? I did this recent teardown hoping to replace the gasket between the back half of the timing cover and the block but now find someone back in the 1960's must have Permatexed that joint and it is basically welded together now, so I'm going to re-clean everything, reseal with silicone again and have a machine shop put a modern seal in the front cover in place of the original slinger which seems to be letting some oil get on the pulley, I really appreciate the washer offer but my bolts are 5/16 and it appeared the bolts were all dry from the last assembly so I'll just repeat that method. Howard Dennis
  11. Welcome to the forum and glad to hear your wife has good taste in cars as do you. Get that 78 F150 finished. That's nice truck and increasing in value almost weekly! Post some good pics inside and out and we'll be glad to provide closer valuation for you. Could be $500 to $5000 but likely closer to lower end. How do you know the floors are solid? If you see rust in quarters and fenders I guarantee there is some level of rust-through in the floors and trunk. Often its difficult to detect unless a more invasive procedure is used such as peeling back carpeting and trunk lining or having it on a lift and poking around with sharp object. Your interpretation of condition may be different than that of experienced Riviera enthusiasts which is why pictures are important to fulfill your request. If you are not able to post pictures you can send me a private message and I'll give you my email then I'll post them for you. What's important to realize with the 71-73 Rivs otherwise known as Boattails, or any year for that matter is fixing them up is very expensive compared to say a mainstream classic like your truck where you can open a catalog and order about anything you need for reasonable price. Its a whole different ballgame with Rivs. You are almost always better off spending more up front and getting a running, driving, stopping, car that is cosmetically presentable thereby minimizing your post purchase investment.
  12. I would say you’re half way down easy street with family support. The other half of easy is if you have a full shop and can do the body work yourself. I recommend no time limits upon yourself. Im hankering for a boat tail myself. Best of luck!
  13. jeff_a

    Peerless Trucks

    Found this postcard for sale on ebay. Couldn't resist posting it. F/S by "foundation*antiques" sellers for 25 bucks:
  14. I really was not looking for anything when this came up. I'm trying to get my 78 f150 finished first before I got another project. But i could not pass up the opratunity to look at a old car horde. I figured if I could get this for a decent price. I would get it And stick it in the corner and start on it when my truck is done. And my wife really wants the car she wont stop bugging me about it. she wants to drive it around in the summer. As far as other cars he has these are the ones I've seen. 2 66 chargers one needs quite a bit of work but all there 70 charger just a roller. what looks to be a late 60s lemons wagon can't quite tell it's got a bunch of junk on it. A 80 corvette witch was what I wanted the most but the frame was rusted. A model t thats been chopped and hot roded and a 37 t bucket that needs lots of work.
  15. This was at the Forest Grove show years back. Had a cool look to it.
  16. Does anyone know which port is the high and low? There is no labeling and the hoses are about the same size. I’m in the process of converting the system to 134 but can’t tell which is which. The shop manual doesn’t specify either. To be clear, it’s a 91 Chrysler TC Maserati with the v6. Thanks in advance.
  17. tastes change in everything, be it cars or automobilia. If you are going to wait for the "right" car/item then just hope you are well enough at the time to enjoy it for a long time if you do get it. Try to think - can I spend that kind of $ on it? is it worth it ( to you , not on the market for resale ) , what do/don't I spend my $ on : gambling, smoking, lavish meals and vacations, clothes, fine booze, ?? What makes you happy? How long will you be around to try and be happy? I have lived my whole life next to one of the premier horse race tracks in the world, the third leg of the annual Triple Crown of racing. Only time I have been there ( two sides of my house face their property) is for anniversary events ( 75th anniversary of the track etc) as I was asked to bring my old car to display . I couldn't place a bet if I was told if I did I would win instantly a million bucks. I don't know how, don't care about it. Life is short. Have enough to be secure where you reside, put food on the table, and treats for your pet, and think you worked your whole life to afford something you would find that will make you happy and proud to have . Old cars make a lot of people happy , you as the owner but also everyone who sees one going down the road under its own power be it 100 years old or 25 years old. We share what we have and take pleasure in doing so. No more sermons or comments from me - at least for the next 24 hours! Walt
  18. Today
  19. 63 Riviera, no engine or transmission. Car is all original, surface rust/oxidation, one dent in front passenger fender and another at the trunk panel (where the lock goes) lock is also missing. All the trim, bumpers etc are excellent, front seats are not torn, ripped. Leather is very dry from storage. Dash pad is beyond repair and steering wheel is cracked. Engine and trans were removed carefully. no cut wires everything intact! Also have the A/C compressor and condenser coil original driveshaft. still has original brakes etc. This car is solid. NO RUST THROUGH anywhere!! Perfect car for restoration. All original glass, even have the hub caps. Located in 60050 $2,500 Please no low ballers!
  20. I like them! And if they are under appreciated so much the better for getting it at a decent price and enjoying it and not worrying about resale. If I was paying $100k then resale would factor in.
  21. Wow these are beautiful but way out of my price range. Looking for more of a project that's a runner.
  22. GreatWarTruck and Blastermike here on the forums are the authorities on that. An agent for the War Department(Britain) showed up in the States and more or less wrote a ticket for a 12,000-unit purchase of Peerless trucks about 1914, so the Brits got most of them. A chassis converted into a sheep hauling wagon turned up in Kansas or Montana a few years ago, then disappeared. 15 years ago, there was a complete 1914 Peerless truck in the Sierra Mountains, a town called Quincy, CA, but it and the owner, Richard Egbert, have vanished. No one here on the AACA Forums is from that area, so the truck is pretty well hidden for now, whatever happened to it. As Tim and Mike could tell you, there are some survivors on the other side of the pond. Sandstone Estates, an agriculture, railroad, and vehicle museum in South Africa has one that still runs. In Ireland and the U.K. there are a few frames, 2 Peerless Armoured Cars, one chassis with a plywood armoured car body used in a Liam Neeson/Julia Roberts film, one truck at a clay quarry museum found under some rubble, 1 being restored by GreatWarTruck, and a Condition #1 TC-4 restored by Richard Flynn as a beer cartage truck. A friend of mine, David Baird, offered to fly me to the UK for the Bonhams auction when all of Richard Flynn's vehicles were sold so I could bid on it. We decided not to follow through on that due to not deep enough pockets. Wise choice: the billionaire movie producer who took it home with him could have outbid us even if I had offered one million pounds. I'll see if I can drag a piccie of the little truck here so you can see what the attraction was.
  23. Often an EGR leak causes a rough or hunting idle, not so much a power loss. The system is generally pretty reliable but can get coked up and need cleaning. There should be no EGR at idle or full throttle but in between the flow varies and can be monitored in diagnostics to see if you can see a correlation between EGR commanded flow and engine performance. You can block the EGR completely to test with a thin metal strip under the valve or even a couple layers of metal foil type duct tape or even aluminum foil. You may expect some ping or knock with the EGR eliminated under some conditions.
  24. I paid $265 for this gem in 1995. At the time I thought I paid over the going rate. Today, don’t know the going rate for it but $265 certainly will not do it. All glass body made by Gill.
  25. great photo other that that guy in the background... geesh, way to photo bomb the perfect shot Ted. :)congrats hope it goes through great promo for the paint company maybe they can come out and do a photo shoot great time of year with the leaves color changing
  26. My dad worked on a Ford assembly line in Detroit during the Harry Bennett years. That explains a lot. Back in the day there were some noticeable engineering innovations and marque differences. Enough to sway a buyer or stoke brand loyalty. Today not so much. That today's makers are removing badges and offering the more or less limited pallet of drab colors adds to the "McDonald's effect." Mopar still seems to have a bit of a following. Other than a couple of Dodge trucks and the odd Durango my only experience with a "Chrysler" was a 1956 St. Regis I restored. It turned out well but other than the sheet metal was pretty much just like all the others. That said there was just something about it I didn't like. Beautiful car but it seemed clumsy when driven ...............Bob
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