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Ted Davenport

Winter Storage advice?

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I live in Chicago. Prior to the Reatta, I had a TR-6, which I lost due to fire. The main concern with the Reatta is battery drain due to the electrics. For this reason, I don't take the battery out, which I did with the Triumph.

First I inflate the tires to maximum listed tire pressure listed at the bead of the tire, usually 42-44#.

Go right now to Wal-Mart and get a Charger/Maintainer. Mine is Vector 1.5 Amps. This has arrangements to use either battery connectors or to go through the cigarette lighter. The big thing with this device is that it doesn't continually trickle charge, but shuts off when not needed. Get it now because they are just beginning to stock them, and prices aren't too bad. About $20.00

Also at Wal-Mart, you can get STA-BIL gasoline preservative and follow instructions to use the correct amount.

Usually I'll start the car every couple of weeks preferably when temperatures are moderate. When starting the car, let it run until the guages get past COLD, and heat comes out in the car.I also change the oil prior too and after storage.

I used to drive the car when weather permitted, but became concerned when I saw how much salt I picked up in Chicago during these short drives.

Check with your insurance agent to see about reductions in coverage during storage. You can save a lot here.

I have never had to put my car on jacks which some recommend, and tires have not been damaged. It is a good idea however when starting the car to move it slightly, so that it rests on a different part of the tires.

Hope that helps.

I don't have the Triumph any more because it caught fire. Keep fire extinguishers handy, beyond the small one you have in the trunk. That was only enough to allow me to open the hood, when the fire really caught. The big one at the house put out the rest of the fire.

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When running the engine, let it run long enough to insure the exhaust system is hot enough that no moisture remains. Helps prevent rust-out of the exhaust system.

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Batteries

Batteries should always be fully charge prior to storage. A fully charge battery will never freeze in winter time. I discharge battery will freeze. Always store a fully charge battery in a cold place. The battery will discharge at a slower rate than keeping in the house. As far as starting power, a warm battery will have more cranking power than a cold battery.

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Guest imported_JohnW

I put mouse glue traps inside the engine compartment and inside the car on the floor. I also put one on the garage floor by the inside and outside of each tire. Dont use mouse poison like "Decon" since you don't want any cridders dieing inside your heater vents. Someone also told me to put laundry drier sheets (bounce) inside the car, trunk and engine compartment. He said the smell repels the rodents but I didn't try that.

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<span style="font-weight: bold">Best/easiest method:</span> Drive it here to Southern California; enjoy the winter at D'land, Magic Mountain, Sea World, Balboa Park, etc., including a barbecue at our house.

<span style="font-weight: bold">-- ALF</span> grin.gif

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This will be the 12th winter storage for mine, and the only thing I do not recommend, from all of the good suggestions listed, is starting the car occasionaly. Unless it can be brought up to full temperature, I believe it does more harm than good. Condensation and contaminents will be put right back into the oil that was changed before storage, especially during a cold start and prolonged idling. You are better off leaving the car remain cold rather than warming and cooling it repeatedly. Three other suggestions, roll the car back and forth several times by hand to provide a slight clearance between the brake pads and rotors (do not apply the parking brake), prop or remove the wiper blades to help prevent them from taking a set and third, it is a good time to apply leather conditioner to the seats and steering wheel, so it has a long time to soak in. Lots of other small suggestions, wash and wax, drive it a short distance after you have completely filled the tank and added fuel stabilizer, so the car is put away hot and dry. Remove the battery or disconnect and occassionally charge or maintain over the winter. Apply silicone or conditioner to the rubber seals around the doors and trunk, normal maintenence items such as lubricating locks and hinges, which get overlooked while being driven. Good stuff to do while you have dedicated time to making it ready for bed grin.gif One last item, try not to store it in the same area as a vehicle that is daily driven in the winter. The salt and other aggressive de-icers used in some areas will find it's way to the stored vehicle.

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I store my convertible...question>>>>

Is there any possiblilty of harm if one of these battery charger/maintainers goes haywire>>>like damaging the cars electronics or worse yet fire???? Also, to remove insurance could be more costly if an unspeakable happened....fire, vandalism, or like the picture EDBSO displayed....just a thought.

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Yup, if the charger maintainer went haywire, the electrics could be fried. Progress of the maintainer can be watched, as a light comes on and off when it is cycling. I watch this, but it isn't fool proof. I just don't want to remove the battery, knowing what can happen to terminals even without doing this. I am small stuff, only having the Reatta, but my boss and largest customers keep fleets of vintage vehicles this way, and have had no problems.

I don't recommend REMOVING insurance, just talking to your agent to remove unneccassary comprehensive portions during storage. You will be covered in event of fire or other theft types of dammage, just not for collision, which shouldn't occur in the garage. This is the type of situation where a good agent earns the few extra bucks he gets.

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Several insurance companies have a "Reduced Use" policy option. You pick 3 or 6 consecutive months where you CAN NOT drive the car and they don't charge you at all for that time although the car remains insured for fire, theft, and vandalism type stuff.

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That's pretty much what I have, but I call Farmers and say to put it on, and call again to say take it off. I go to those coverages at will. Farmers is not my choice as there are excellant collector car options. But, Farmers has my other coverage, and I'm waiting till I have three years since my antique vehicle claim, which is a question they ask.

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