wildcatsrule

Origin of the expression "Deuce and a Quarter?"

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Thanks! As far as making mistakes go - no-one got hurt, but I'll have a red face for about a month, no doubt.

This is how we learn, isn't it? What doesn't kill you just makes you older and more embarrassed... :D

I've done it. So have many of these guys. Some of us are better at admitting it.

:D

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Tell someone you own a Buick Electra and the first thing they say is "deuce and a quarter". My car is a deuce, two dimes, and a penny; 221". I just tell them a couple of years before it would have been a Super. The four inches is all in the quarter panel. Maybe a "deuce and 'dem big quarters" would be more appropriate.

I prefer the trim quarters and conservative lack of trim cladding.

Batavia1.JPG

Of course I have always been a big car, skinny woman kind of guy. Them big quarters, well, they do have followers.

In white as well.

post-46237-143142935698_thumb.jpg Yep, an extra 4" in the quarters.

Bernie

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As I understand it the 225 represents the length of the car. Deuce and a quarter saying, for lack of a better term, was slang for the Buick 225. Origin unknown but I have hear the slang term from blacks who have owned them or would have liked to have had one. I have used the slang word myself cause everyone loves a Deuce and a quarter. ;)

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Guest my3buicks
Tell someone you own a Buick Electra and the first thing they say is "deuce and a quarter". My car is a deuce, two dimes, and a penny; 221". I just tell them a couple of years before it would have been a Super. The four inches is all in the quarter panel. Maybe a "deuce and 'dem big quarters" would be more appropriate.

I prefer the trim quarters and conservative lack of trim cladding.

Batavia1.JPG

Of course I have always been a big car, skinny woman kind of guy. Them big quarters, well, they do have followers.

In white as well.

[ATTACH=CONFIG]290983[/ATTACH] Yep, an extra 4" in the quarters.

Bernie

The 59 Electra really couldn't be considered a Super replacement - I would say the 225 Replaced the Limited, the Electra replaced the Roadmaster, the Invicta replaced the Century and the LeSabre replaced the Special - the Super was put out to pasture. Of course that is subjective. Then again, I always felt owning a Century then was more desirable than owning a Super.

BTW, your picture of the Electra is beautiful, and has far better lines than the trollop in the sprayed on tights.

Edited by my3buicks (see edit history)

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When my father purchased his Electra 225s from Bauer Buick in Harvey, Illinois, the dealer called the car an "Electra Two-Twenty-Five". I believe that is the correct name.

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When my father purchased his Electra 225s from Bauer Buick in Harvey, Illinois, the dealer called the car an "Electra Two-Twenty-Five". I believe that is the correct name.

Yup. That's what we called them around here anyway. Dandy Dave!

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When my father purchased his Electra 225s from Bauer Buick in Harvey, Illinois, the dealer called the car an "Electra Two-Twenty-Five". I believe that is the correct name.

You are correct, as we all are aware, but the intent of this thread is to see if anyone knows the origins of the slang term "duece and a quarter" which was used when referring to the two twenty five.

Ed

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Guest my3buicks

I think the term deuce & a quarter probably originated in a more "urban" environment (no disrespect intended) and just took off from there. When I had my 69 Electra convertible it was common for folks to refer to it as a D & a Q and would often get that yelled as I drove down the street with it. Just how many car models have cool nicknames? I like it.

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Does anyone know how the expression "Deuce and a Quarter" came to be used as a slang reference for the Electra 225? Obviously, it is a play on the numbers "225," but I was wondering if the expression could be traced to any particular person(s), place or time? I just thought there might be an interesting story about it. David

225 is the reason, also the lesabre was known as a sword

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