tuffet1

Year make and model

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I bought a car no title  it was cheap told it was a 28 buick speedster but can't find anything about it there's a tag that has

Job # 7710

Body # 8528 and another tag has 28.  58 on it can anyone tell me any information about this car

 

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Photographs of the car and of the (I.D.) tags in their mounted positions would be very helpful.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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You might want to try a camera, phone pictures often end up  like this . Are we looking through a bathroom window ? 

 

Greg

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I don't think Buick built any sort of "speedster" model in the late '20s. And the "speedster" craze had pretty much ended by 1929, before the crash. So what the car is is important to its value, both in dollars and historic value.

Years ago, I knew a fine fellow in the hobby that had a mid '20s Buick speedster. It was an incredible car, well built and nicely styled. It was said to have been an original era build that he restored quite nicely.

Other than that one Buick, I have seen several other "Buick speedsters" or "race cars" built on mid to late '20s Buick chassis. NONE of them have been authentically done, or were original era builds. Most were horrible, butchered in the '50s or '60s (or even later) using incorrect parts no idea of proper era styling or construction methods. When I hear of late '20s or early '30s "speedsters"? I first see in my mind some really nasty junk.

The "Speedster craze" and some of the local amateur racing that accompanied it was basically coming to its end by the late '20s. It was being replaced with what we often refer to now as "gow-jobs" or "go-jobs", which are a more direct link to the later "hotrod" craze after WWII. The key difference between these "craze" eras is that in the "speedster" years, the first thing one did was eliminate the original body, and built what appeared to be a racing car upon the factory chassis. However, racing itself had changed a lot from the rough and tumble early days, when crude bodies on stripped-down chassis was the professional norm. Of course, in professional racing, that racing chassis was usually also custom built. But for speedsters, even a stock or slightly modified chassis was fast enough to scare the bejeebers out of someone used to maximum speeds of about 30 mph. By the mid 1920s, real racing was using slick totally custom built cars, and most people were used to even the family car being able to do more than 45 mph on a good back road. So the old stripped down "speedster" had become unsatisfying. It was time to step it up a notch. It was no longer "cool" to have a simple seat on a stripped down chassis. So, bodies themselves became stripped down, retaining some of its original form, and comfort. Greater speed and better handling at that speed became more important for the thrill, so modifications to engines, wheels, and suspension became more extreme. The result, was what today are usually called the "gow-job" in many circles. These eventually grew into the hotrods of the '40s and '50s continuing on into this day.

 

I also know of a beautifully restored 1919 Buick racing car. It was carefully researched, and restored using proper era techniques and styling. However, that car is still within the years that such cars were being built. A 1928 is probably out of proper year range for a speedster. 

So, what it is, and how and when was it built is important. Some really good pictures of the whole car would help a lot to identify it here. Some of the numbers you give above should be able to identify what it was originally. But what it was originally probably was not a speedster.

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Job #7710 is a 1928 Buick Master Six coupe Model 58 on a 128" wheelbase. One of the more impressive looking Buicks of the era.

 

1928-buick-1.jpg

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That is a pretty good looking Buick chassis and cowl. A lot of potential there. If you can make it look like the car in the old clipping, it could be a good car and a lot of fun! And for fairly little cost.

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