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1935Packard

Protective mud

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My 1935 Packard is a mostly original car, and one area that has never been touched is the underbody and chassis.   My grandfather bought the car in 1942 and never touched the underbody;  I've had the car for the last 11 years and never touched it, either.   Most of it has a light surface rust, together with some areas where you can still see the original tan paint and other areas where you can see the 1978 silver paint that was just spray painted on with no cleaning at all.   But there are some areas with old patches of mud on the frame that have been dried on for decades.  I know this because several areas of the dried mud have the 1978 silver paint painted on top of them, so they must have been old by 1978 -- old enough that the prior painter just lazily spray-painted over them. 

 

Anyway, yesterday I tried cleaning up one area of mud that was painted over with the 1978 paint.  A power-washer didn't help, but after getting it wet and letting it soak for a while I was able to peel the dirt off with the flat edge of a large screwdriver.   The neat thing was that when I removed the dried mud, the chassis underneath was in very nice condition: Zero rust, and the original black chassis paint.  Here's the spot, partly cleaned up:

 

 361446849_ScreenShot2018-11-09at1_43_21PM.thumb.png.a8bbe028ca912bf38ad22086756606cb.png

 

And here's some of the vintage mud I removed, almost an inch thick in places and with some silver 1978 paint still visible : 

 

1055973559_ScreenShot2018-11-09at1_45_15PM.png.996edfa9b371dfb972532029d8fddfb2.png

 

Now that's some protective mud!  Too bad it wasn't covering the whole chassis, though.

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5 minutes ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

Your car will go faster now that you have shed that extra weight. Save the mud, you can sell it to someone wanting that original/unrestored look.

 

That's right on both counts.  These days, "barn-find" mud, dirt, dust, droppings (of any kind) and universal crud are in high demand for that "original, untouched, just-found" look.  There's gold in that thar mud!

 

Cheers,

Grog

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That ain't mud, it's redneck undercoating. "Back in the day" many new car owners would go to the muddiest, stickiest road they could find to intentionally get a layer of protective mud on their car. They would repeat it every fall before the roads were salted. 

 

Don

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2 hours ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

Your car will go faster now that you have shed that extra weight. Save the mud, you can sell it to someone wanting that original/unrestored look.

 

...that would be me!  LOL

So, how much for the vintage green mud?

1930 PU.jpg

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1 hour ago, keiser31 said:

Do 1935 Packards have mechanical brakes?

 

Yes, the senior cars do -- vacuum-assisted mechanical brakes.  Packard didn't switch to hydraulic brakes on the senior cars until 1937, I believe.

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Ahh, shades of my first car in 77, 78, 1941 Plymouth with 35 years of grime underneath.  I spent two days with a couple putty knives cleaning the underside.  A good use of time for a 14 year old! ?

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13 hours ago, Real Steel said:

 

...that would be me!  LOL

So, how much for the vintage green mud?

1930 PU.jpg

Not so fast Real Steel, I could be a buyer for the vintage green mud. I think there is going to be a bidding war.

34 hudson pictures 028.JPG

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I specifically remember a BMW 328 (the 1930s version, not the late model) pulled out of a barn by RM auctions at the height of "barn find" mania. They had cleared a small spot on the windshield so the guy behind the wheel could see where he was going. But in what I thought was the ultimate in stupidity regarding "authentic deterioration" they saved the dirt they removed from the windshield in a little baggie so it could be reapplied by the new owner, who surely wanted to pretend that it was he who found the car and dragged it out of its tomb.

 

I'd be careful about removing too much simply because you just don't know what you're going to find. Most likely it's solid and in good order, but if it's not, now you've got a decision to make: take it all off and fix what you find or live with it even though you now know there are issues. Are you able to do either of those things? It's how many a frame-off restoration gets started...

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 I think that vintage mud probably contains a lot of dripping oil and grease deposited over the years that kept the frame rust free.

 I have been reconditioning trucks for sale for over 50 years and 

have noticed that in the first twenty years, the oily mud was much thicker as nobody ever cleaned the underside of them.

 In recent years however, the DOT does not like a oily frame and I never see the mud anymore, or the oil.

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On ‎11‎/‎9‎/‎2018 at 8:19 PM, keiser31 said:

Do 1935 Packards have mechanical brakes?

 

Yes Packards use mechanical brakes until 1937.

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They oiled the roads to keep the dust down (and in many placed today you can still find dirt roads in least expected areas).  Remember working an a 5K mile CCCA car that only left downtown LA once - it was packed with mud underneath. 

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On 11/10/2018 at 7:44 AM, Matt Harwood said:

 

I'd be careful about removing too much simply because you just don't know what you're going to find. Most likely it's solid and in good order, but if it's not, now you've got a decision to make: take it all off and fix what you find or live with it even though you now know there are issues. Are you able to do either of those things? It's how many a frame-off restoration gets started...

 

That was the biggest mud area, so not much more to remove.   As for issues, if they're safety-related or reliability-related I take care of them; if they're just cosmetic, I leave them alone.  I've had the car for 11 years and put around 9K miles on the car without trying to clean up down there, so I doubt I would want to have anything done to it.  And while from time to time I ponder getting the car repainted, I was fortunately cured of any interest in restoring the car after I talked to some folks at reputable shops and was quoted some likely restoration costs.   :)

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