Kestrel

how do you work under your cars ?

Recommended Posts

11 hours ago, KongaMan said:

Until you fall into it. ;)

After 40 years the only person to fall in was a nighttime intruder.  The next morning I found blood at the top and bottom of the pit along with some tooth fragments.

I have been injured by lifts (especially 4 post) by banging my head on the structure nearly every time I get around them. 

The pit is especially handy when the job requires some top and bottom work...no need to run the lift up and down or get on ladder.

Neither my ceiling height or floor structure would accommodate a lift anyhow and I despise jack stands and creepers and the whole "lizard routine".

  • Haha 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends on the job.

 

I restored a 1970's 3 Ton floor jack that seems to have a faster two speed function than more modern ones I have tried. It has a good height. I only use Hein Werner jack stands, but never one single support system. Always an extra jack or jack stand at the end I am working on, even a stack of wheels and tires under the car.

003.thumb.JPG.965c373d0c0a816918477a6a042ddca0.JPG

 

For working around the perimeter I have a Snap On scissors lift. Even though it doesn't show extra jack stands or secondary support goes with that.

This lift can interfere with the torque tube and is hard to get just right.

005.thumb.JPG.9396a1fb3ddfea5efa9fb15e3b05d1f5.JPG

 

On a high recommendation from a friend I recently bought a Kwik Lift system that I like. As shown, the floor jack would stay under while working. I also picked up four short jack stands that fit nicely under the raised ramps. I always have two supporting devices or I won't go under.

004.thumb.JPG.8f7df55cffd41a1de4688f39a2908602.JPG

 

I am in the process of cutting two doors into the wall on the right side of the pictured Riviera, arranging the cars in back 90 degrees. I may add a MaxJax when that change is done.

The cars are a wonderful excuse to buy tools. The Kwik Lift was justified because I bought the extremely high maintenance V12 BMW last February. At least that is the story my Wife believes.

 

Edit: I had my garage built in 1988 with an 8' ceiling. Two years later garage lifts stated to become popular with home hobbyists. Otherwise a 4 post with nice roller jack would be in there too, maybe an addition.

Bernie

Edited by 60FlatTop (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, old-tank said:

The pit is especially handy when the job requires some top and bottom work...no need to run the lift up and down or get on ladder.

In my humble opinion, a pit would be the way to go, precisely for the convenience referred to above.  However, the government has made use of a pit "next to impossible" with regs dealing with electric. ventilation and drainage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/10/2018 at 9:53 AM, old-tank said:

 

I have been injured by lifts (especially 4 post) by banging my head on the structure nearly every time I get around them. 

The pit is especially handy when the job requires some top and bottom work...no need to run the lift up and down or get on ladder.

Neither my ceiling height or floor structure would accommodate a lift anyhow and I despise jack stands and creepers and the whole "lizard routine".

 

 

You stating you have gotten injured by a four post....it has reminded my of a scar on my chin.   This was courtesy of an alignment rack lift.     Bang the top of my head quite a few times. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anyway,

 

Her is the 54 getting a new clutch and replacement of the 3 speed.   4 jack stands.   I find sleeping under the car on the cardboard is not so bad.  I have been know to take a short nap under there from time to time. 

 

dfWvT9t.jpg  

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

… before getting my expanding BenPak 7,000 lb lift …. I always and still do use a simple setup consisting of the following 4- metal ramps, one inexpensive high lift rolling 2-ton jack ( One which allows one to take the round single jack point bagel pad that comes on the jack and purchase an replacement attachment which is an adjustable width single arm with bar with dual outrigged bagel pads) . One 25-foot towing cable preferably a fabric one so it does not abrasion your under-carriage components.  Also purchase an inexpensive winch.  As an anchoring point for the winch use a metal concrete form stake that is slipped into the garage slab.  To accomplish that, one simply uses a roto-hammer with a 7/8-inch diameter bit that drills a simple and clean hole in the garage allowing for the inserting of the steel concrete form stake into the slab. This simple setup allows one to slip the neck ring off the winch over the steel stack creating a solid pull anchor for the winch.  So when the winch is pulling it is securely set and the pulling force is countered by the steel stake.  Use an 18-inch long metal concrete stake, hammer it down into the hole using a small sledge hammer being sure to leave at least 8-inches of stake protruding above the garage slab. A vis-grip will remove it anytime later whenever you need to. If installing into a garage, I place a minimum of 6-8  inches from the edge of slab from the foundation stem wall. This setup is reusable or can be permanent.  Works like a charm every time.  Set either 2 x 4 blocks or use bolts to keep the front ramp/block assembly from sliding forward on the concrete slab as you winch the car up and forward.  Winch pull the front of the car up onto the ramps and then use the rolling jack to lift the rear and set the rear ramps into place making sure to rotate the ramps 180-degrees from the front ramps as an additional safety precaution so the car won't be able to roll backward.  Set the emergency brake. Regarding the metal ramps  For additional height other than what the 6-inches height a ramp will give you.   I use 4 x 12's  &  2 x 12's cut to the appropriate length and cut them to extend at least 8-inches longer then the length of the metal ramps. If the car is not operable the winch and winch strap can be used to pull the car into the garage and up onto the ramp setup.  This will give you the 9-11 inch standard curb height as measured from the slab to the bottom of the frame plus the height of the metal ramps and the height of the number of wooden members you wish to place under the ramps.

 

In the first two photos the winch location can be seen in front of the car.  It was used to pull the car up onto the front ramps. It will pull the car up with the ramps along with a setup that include 4 x 12's and 1- 2 x 12.  I set  The rear ramps as stated above were placed by lifting the rear end with the single beam jack and simply placing the metal stands/wood under rear wheels.  The  height of this setup pictured below allows 18-1/2 inches as can seen of free workable secure space. As stated If additional height is required than add more 4 x 12 or 2 x 12 as desired

 

 

 

 

 

.  

Coupe Frame 8.JPG

Coupe Frame 30.JPG

DSCF1734.JPG

Edited by buick man (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here is a photo of my Bendpak lift in my shop.  Although the  7,000 lb capacity lift goes to 7-feet, due to my limited 8-foot ceiling height I can get about 40-inches of workable clearance and in only a matter of minutes.  I use 4-rubber blocks strategically located so the frame is off the ramp which allows me to work under any portion of frame or sill area

 

 

Fatnwide 2.JPG

Fatnwide 4.JPG

Fatnwide Sump 4.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, buick man said:

Here is a photo of my Bendpak lift in my shop.  Although the  7,000 lb capacity lift goes to 7-feet, due to my limited 8-foot ceiling height I can get about 40-inches of workable clearance and in only a matter of minutes.  I use 4-rubber blocks strategically located so the frame is off the ramp which allows me to work under any portion of frame or sill area

 

 

Fatnwide 2.JPG

Fatnwide 4.JPG

Fatnwide Sump 4.JPG

 

That jack looks very good.  May I ask some questions:

* Does the mechanism of the jack have a safety locks for less than full height? 

* Can you leave the jack on the floor and drive a car over it on a continuous use basis?  Not daily use, I'm just wondering if the jack could be stored compressed on the floor and then driven over a few times a week or so?

* Is the jack mobile enough that you could drag it outside and use it at it's full height?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great questions John …. Yes, safety locks at your desired height ….This BenPak lift uses an auxiliary shop air supply line to actuate a solid chunk of heavy metal tooth that rides over the top of an opposing solid "step piece" that is set into the lift foot base and the solid heavy metal tooth rides over the top of and sets for each 4-inches or so as the lift rises.  This sliding lock action secures the lift as it goes up the steps and effectively locks the assembly at each 4-inch stage.  To lower, the control tower as can be seen in the photo has a air actuated push button on the console.  To lower you first raise the lift slightly enough to disengage the metal locking tooth and then push the air button and hold, then begin to lower.  It will automatically lock the tooth at any desired height by releasing the air button allowing the tooth to once again bite into the step locks.  Each side of the ramp has this locking/air mechanism so as the lift rises this lock system engages.  7,000 lb capacity to 7-feet high.

 

Yes you can leave it on the floor when not in use and drive over it at anytime and just use it as a parking bump :D if you will.  The lift surprisingly lowers to a height of around 5 1/2 inches.  There are heavy removal ramps forward and aft for each ramp.  The dead weight of this unit is 2,300 lbs.  So once it is set it's not going to slide around on the floor.  I bought this one as used and rented a tilting flat bead trailer with ramp to get it home and backed it up to the front of the shop.  Then used my winch setup as explained above to pull the entire unit off sliding down the ramp onto my shop floor.  Then used the winch to position into place.  Some folks, cut out a rectangular section of their garage floor, then form up and place reinforced concrete so the lift itself can be lowered into it so the ramps are slab height.  This lowered section is about 6 inches deep once formed and in place, but driving over it with GM steel and the height of our cars is no problem including my 2001 full sized Buick.  The Porsche pictured had no clearance problems as well but as shown has not front or rear bumpers attached.  The guys with lowered cars like the idea of cutting the slab and placing the lift down so their cars can easily drive over the top of the lift since it is at slab height.  Neat trick but I would only do that if I had a duty purpose only shop and not as a garage/shop combo.  Oh God maybe someday, please I will have a dedicated shop/studio setup. :wub:   The BenPak folks want you to bolt the lift to the existing slab but it can be use without the bolts.   - dave

 

 

  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just came across this picture and remembered the topic. You can see the four mounted wheels and tires we put under the rear bumper as a back up to the jack stands and the jack. This was after we rolled the rear end out and prepped the underside for cleaning and fresh undercoat.

 

010.thumb.JPG.60c5814ed05f3799aac358511cced00b.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now