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bodayguy

Installing Edelbrock electric choke on 64

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So any advice from you experienced folks? What did you tap the power line into?

 

I notice the instructions suggest removing the carb, but that seems unnecessary (I hope).

elec-choke.JPG

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I did it the complicated way but for a reason.  I changed oil pressure sending unit to one that has two terminals on it.  I run the wire from one terminal back to the oil pressure light (factory) and use the other terminal to the choke.  This set up ensures that there's no current going to the choke until the engine has oil pressure and is running.  Any time the key is on but the engine is not running, the choke is not being activated.  So if you're cranking and the engine won't start, the choke isn't getting any current and it's not working.  Same thing if the engine stalls.  The two terminal oil pressure sender was used on some carbureted Buicks back in the 70's and 80's so I'm just using some later technology on my older car.

 

Ground wire to the choke, hot wire to the yellow wire that goes to the kick down.  That yellow wire comes from the fuse box and also supplies 12V to the windshield wipers, rarely used. and probably never used during start up.  

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Unless the automatic transmission is also changed to a late model transmission, I would suggest the original hot air choke is head and shoulders above the electric.

 

If one installs an electric choke on a pre-mid-1970's vehicle with the original AUTOMATIC transmission, then my advice would be either:

 

(A) After starting the vehicle in the morning, allow it to idle while you go back inside and drive TWO cups of coffee SLOWLY

 

OR

 

(B) Subscribe to Triple A

 

I learned this lesson the hard way maybe 35 years ago. I was too busy to replace the heat tube on my wife's car, so installed the electric choke. She would start the car, drive it three blocks to a stop sign, the engine stalled AND WOULD NOT RESTART! This happened twice, and she informed me either fix it or buy me a new car! The issue is the choke would be wide open after 45 seconds but the engine would not run at idle (driving kicked off the fast idle cam), and with the choke wide open she was unable to start the engine on cooler (mid 50's) days. Spent the next week-end fixing the hot air choke, and she again loved the car! Of course, one can always block traffic at the stop sign/light for about 20 minutes allowing the choke coil to re-close.:P

 

Jon.

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I have an electric choke on my Riviera and it runs perfect, starts right up cold, does not die ever. If that is not the case it isn't adjusted correctly.

  

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22 minutes ago, Seafoam65 said:

I have an electric choke on my Riviera and it runs perfect, starts right up cold, does not die ever. If that is not the case it isn't adjusted correctly.

  

What do you consider "cold" in Plano, Texas? ;)

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3 hours ago, Seafoam65 said:

I have an electric choke on my Riviera and it runs perfect, starts right up cold, does not die ever.  

 

My stock choke works the same. ;) 

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Problem with my stock choke is it doesn't work on cold start, so I have to sit there for a minute giving it gas until the fuel bowl is OK, and I checked the air tube and it's fine. Once the car has fuel, it idles fine and doesn't die, etc.

 

I figured the electric choke would improve things.

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If you have to wait for the fue bowl, you need to find out where the gas went that was in the fuel bowl when you shut it off.

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That doesn't sound like a choke problem...  I mean, the choke doesn't control fuel flow to the bowls.

 

Next time it's cold out, pop the accelerator, take the cover off the air cleaner, and look at the carb.  Is the choke closed?

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From the "troubleshooting" section of our website:

HARD STARTING, COLD

Difficult starting a vehicle that has been allowed to sit for a number of days (that will then start well the rest of the day) is often caused by modern fuel. Modern fuel begins to vaporize (evaporate) at a much lower temperature than fuel before the 1970’s. Once the engine is shut off, the fuel in the carburetor bowl begins to evaporate through the bowl vent. If there is no fuel in the carburetor, the engine will not start. Pumping the footfeed during this time simply prolongs the agony, as the accelerator pump will pump the fuel into the engine, but in amounts insufficient for starting. If you have this problem, try priming the carburetor by using an eyedropper and filling the carburetor bowl through the bowl vent prior to cranking the engine. If you do not wish to prime the engine, crank the engine for 15 to 20 seconds WITHOUT PUMPING. Then stop cranking, pump the footfeed 3 or 4 times, release it, and then reattempt to start the engine. Priming eliminates excessive wear on the starter. Another possible solution is the installation of an electric fuel pump. If an electric pump is installed, check local, state, and federal laws about wiring; and pick a pump with pressure not exceeding that of the original pump.

Jon.

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Yeah I understand the typical cold start issues and this is a recent problem. The choke doesn’t seem to close the plate.

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Adjust the choke.  Loosen the screws around the perimeter, turn it until it closes, then tighten it up and see how it works.

 

I suspect there are more detailed instructions in the manual, but if it closes when cold and opens when warm, you should be good. 

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I have installed more than a dozen Edelbrock chokes on Buick and Caddy AFB's and really like them.  Mind you, I am in SoFla, so I can only comment on this appication in my weather.  If you are trying do this in freezing weather, more tuning may be necessary.  The E-brock choke bolts on, but I swap the actuator arm(the one that passes throught the hpusing to the choke arm) with the original.  Will bolt in, no mods neccessary.  I typically tap into the heater for power(at fuse box), but I like Rivnut's method, that is better. They last a long time. The one on my 64 KX Riv is 10 years old and still works great.  When done, you hit the gas once, choke sets and hit the key, that's it.  I know Carbking loves the stock chokes, but I have never been able to get one to work as it should, at least not consistently.  

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I daily drive mine to work (64 Riviera) when the weather is good.   I have an Electric choke also and it works great.  Drove it to work today (40 degrees) and had no problems.  I can start and go if I want to (which I did today because I was late taking my daughter to school before I go to work)  I never ran the stock choke before so I don't know what I'm missing, but the electric one works great.

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