Sign in to follow this  
Toml33611

Advice on what to do with a 65 Skylark Convertible

Recommended Posts

Looking for advice on what to do with a 1965 Buick Skylark Gran Sport Convertible.  I just inherited this vehicle from my in-laws and they have owned it since new in 1965.  The car is pretty tired.  It has original interior....is in desperate need of paint...on its second engine.....brakes do not work (Original Drum brake system) and has 91,000 miles.  I have no idea what the vehicle is even worth but it does run and obviously needs brake work at a bare minimum.  Any insight on how to maximize the value of the car with out losing thousands of dollars on repairs (i.e paint/cosmetics)?  Is it worth doing the disc brake conversion?IMG_0047.thumb.jpg.3b56c800217c0c4336764b08f0eed226.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are looking to sell it,  just detail it up the best you can as is.  Any brake work you consider is only worth it if it runs pretty good and then can be a driver.  Restoring the original drum brakes will be cheaper than converting to disc brakes.  If it needs minimal work to make it run good,  I would consider doing that.  Then brakes and pretty much put it up for sale if you are looking to sell it.  If you can't get it to run well,  then don't do the brakes.  The brakes are a toss up.  It will make it more marketable,  but then again you have to charge more for it especially if it doesn't run very well.  

If it is original paint there it is alot more forgiving than if it has been repainted.  People love cars with original paint,  even if it isn't exactly in real good shape. 

Show us some more photos.  Maybe we can throw some educated guesses your way as to a value and better guidance as what to do to market it or make it more marketable. 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is your plan for the car ... keep it ... sell it?  You said that you want to "... maximize the value of the car ... " , so I take that to mean that you want to sell it.  More photographs (any damage/rust spots, interior, engine bay etc.) would be helpful.  It would also be nice to have a history of the car such as where it was driven (harsh winters, salted roads etc.).

 

Cheers,

Grog

 

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I would not start modifying it if you want maximum value. Stock Sells.  Get the brakes fixed, detail it and sell as a running/Driving car.  Easy restortions are every buyer's dream.  A drivable car is just so much easier to sell and increases the number of prospective buyers with that impossible dream.

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
51 minutes ago, Paul Dobbin said:

Get the brakes fixed, detail it and sell as a running/Driving car.

Agreed. Non running, non driving cars don't sell as fast unless it's a highly desirable car.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you are able to do brake work youself... do so. Drums work just fine and will be cheap to fix. Dont touch the paint. Motor just needs to run. If it can move and stop then thats your max return.

 

Of course you should really just keep it and learn a thing or two. Youll be driving and enjoying it in no time.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Guys.  I have uploaded a few more photos of the car.  I think I will go ahead and get the brakes fixed by a local shop and clean her up and drive for a little while.  Any educated guess on what its worth?  

IMG_0088.jpg

IMG_0087.jpg

IMG_0086.jpg

IMG_0085.jpg

IMG_0084.jpg

IMG_0083.jpg

IMG_0062.jpg

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

set a reserve and list it on ebay. that is what it is worth on that given day, in the universe.

 

if you want to know ahead of time, go to completed auctions on ebay and see what they sold for- not what they were listed at.....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There are 3 pricing approaches for a nice all original car like this. (1) Someone who would plan to retain it fully original and enjoy it largely "as is" could take it to many car shows as well as drive it and would pay a good price since he/she would have to make very little investment on top of initial purchase price to have a rare presentable car. So if he bought it for $10K and spent $2K refurbishing, he's in for $12K. This would be my approach. (2) Someone could see it as a moderate restoration project, plan a full mechanical overhaul and new paint, a tidy up here or there. If she bought it for $10K and spent $15K on refurbishing, she's in for $25K, and likely not over the market. Finally there is the show car enthusiast who loves this model and year, with more money to spend than you or me. He would buy it for $15K-$20K and spend another $40K-$60K and be in for $55K-$80K or more, including turning it into a rest-mod. While my values are intended to only show the difficulty in establishing a true "value" as is, at the end of the day a buyer has to have an end goal in mind. Even a keeper should you decide to retain it, has to have an end goal in mind.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think it's a nice car!  Interior looks to be very decent.  I can't tell if that's a tach in the center console but if so, might it give us some insight into the size of the engine.  The fact that it's a convertible enhances the value tremendously. 

When you indicate that it doesn't run well, what's it doing?  Perhaps just an oil change, plugs, points and condenser might be a huge help and certainly, along with brakes make for an easier sell.  You're not talking a lot of money for a tune-up and after that you just may fall a bit in love  and have fun driving it.

Please keep us posted.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No Buick expert, but I can tell you that this is a fairly rare and desirable car. I have a friend who had a coupe in the 70's. It was Buick' first attempt at a joining the muscle car mania,  and it was fast. Up until several months ago I hadn't seen another one like it. Your car is unmolested, the way many collectors like to find them. This is a Buick 401 cu" engine and very robust, I'm just wondering why you think that the engine is tired. The car's condition seems to indicate an original car and unless it has been abused I see no reason why the drive train would not be serviceable as is. In my opinion, this a gem as found.  IMHO the less you do to the car the more desirable the car will be to a collector, and the higher dollar return. Get it running and do the brakes I think that you will be amazed  at the response! i would move this to the Buick portion of this forum.

https://musclecars.howstuffworks.com/classic-muscle-cars/1965-buick-skylark-gran-sport.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I would also head over to 65gs.com and V8buick.com to talk to them.  The price on anything is largely based on condition, and that is always subject to the whims and caprices of the buyer and often not fully apparent in pictures, for good or for bad. 

 

The pictures show that your car is as you said, tired but complete.  It may or may not have a lot of filler in it, but the door gaps look decent, so it's probably structurally solid.  GS convertibles are always popular, so somebody will want it if you decide to sell, as long as you aren't unrealistic in your expectations.  Buicks rarely bring the money of comparable Chevelles and GTOs.  Good luck!

Edited by Aaron65 (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for your replies.  I went ahead and brought it to the local garage and all the mechanics were gushing over it.  Pretty cheap brake fix and tune up as previously mentioned.  I think there was some earlier confusion but the engine isn't tired.  Certainly runs just fine and has plenty of power.  The car itself just sort of looks like a 54 year old car. To be expected.  I appreciate everyone's  insight.  I am new to owning a classic car and and your guidance is helpful.  Still don't have any idea what its value is but i suppose its worth what anyone is willing to pay for it!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, old car fan said:

I will take it,love it.put a price on it

Better hurry.  That car looks to be in good condition. The seats aren't all torn, the dash isn't all cracked, and the engine compartment doesn't look bad either, looks to be all there.  Would be a fun car.  Hey honey... I found this 1965 Skylark ..................................;)

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have a great opportunity to slowly restore this beauty.  I'm sure most of us are drooling at the chance to begin cleaning up the engine compartment.  Start with that - it's my pet peeve when looking at a classic and it can easily be done.  You originally mentioned "enhancing its value".  Cleaning it up will be a good start after that tune-up and brake job.  Join the AACA and become addicted like the rest of us.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tuning the engine and doing the brakes was the right thing to do first.  The next move, if you have not done so would be to change the oil and filter and do a lube job.  Then I would clean it up and do a gentle polishing and wax.  You may be surprised what a difference it makes.  I would keep the car completely stock and IMHO do not put on big custom wheels!

Edited by michel88 (see edit history)
  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Beautiful car..... keep it!  Not too many people have the opportunity to own a vehicle that had one owner AND you know who they are.  Take the winter months to go over the vehicle ( maintenance / cleaning ) you'll appreciate the vehicle that you have there and you will be ready to cruise in it next spring !

 

 

Steve

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Tom, this is a great car and you should fix it up and keep it.  The drum brakes as everyone said will stop the car fine.  The joy you will get out of owning this car will be far more than the dollar value.  Listen to the advice on this car and have fun at the same time doing some of the work yourself.  The Buick Club is a strong club for your car, literature is easy to find and when the top is down in summer you will love it.  If you keep the car let me know...a free membership to AACA is yours for the asking.  Just PM me with your name and address!

  • Like 4
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Congratulations on acquiring this awesome low mileage one owner with such cool family ties not to mention it's a Buick. I'll echo the good advice of @Steve Moskowitz above,  keep this nice old Buick, you'll not regret it.

Please join us on down the page in the Buick forums."When Better Buick Enthusiasts Friendships are Built, the Buick Forum will Build Them"

 

Buick Forums here

 

and please consider posting your story  there in our Me and My Buick forum, I am sure it will have a big following.

 

Me and My Buick here

 

and by all means please consider joining the Buick Club of America

 

Buick Club of America here

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Understand the folks here are hard wired towards emotional involvement with old cars rather than a more pragmatic involvement ( not that there's anything wrong with that ). If you feel an attraction to the car and have the time and resources that owning an old car involves then by all means keep it. A good approach would be to fix the mechanicals to make sure it is safe (pay attention to the age of the tires rather than only the tread depth) , clean and detail it, then use it for a year.  By then you should know if you wish to continue with it or if it's more trouble than it's worth. In any event you will be in a good position to either sell or keep it............Bob

 

Edited by Bhigdog
addition (see edit history)
  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this