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mikeyz123

1949 Chrysler windsor

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So i have a 1949 Chrysler windsor, vehicle doesn’t start up right away, took of carburetor and sprayed it with carburetor cleaner. Also used some starter fluid. I changed the spark plugs and i know there is also an exhaust leak and radiator leak but I don’t think that would prevent the car from starting. Also a new battery. Any suggestions would help.

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Does it start at all?  Not clear from your description saying it does not start right away.  If you need starting fluid to get it going that could be clue #1.

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By spraying it with carb cleaner you now have a much better looking carb, but you have done nothing for the running condition of it.

 Looking down into the carb, have someone step quickly on the gas pedal, if you do not see a squirt of gas, your accelerator pump is not working. That is what gives the motor the extra gas it needs to start.

 You also may have low compression, sticky valves, slow cranking or weak ignition.

Edited by Roger Walling (see edit history)
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Make certain that all battery cables are at least 0 gauge. Most hard starting is tied to 12v replacement cables and or bad connections at battery, starter, or ground (usually ground).  It is the first thing I check on any 6 volt vehicle with starting problems. You can get a good set of 0 or 00 (better yet) made at almost any welding shop.

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Check for fuel.

Check for spark.

Check for compression.

Check for timing.

 

A car that wont start needs trouble shooting. Maybe parts after that.

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Thanks everyone for their feedback, my other question is how to adjust the emergency brake, not sure how to do it and i know it needs to be adjusted.

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May I suggest you get a shop manual for your car.  These are must have for owning and repairing a car like this.  Don’t get me wrong, we do enjoy helping out on the forum but based on my own experiences there’s nothing like having access to the shop manual when trying to fix problems.

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On the rear of the transmission there is a band with a cable attached at the top,  loosen the nuts, back off the one on the cable side a  bit, tighten the outer one.

Many parking brakes work poorly because of grease and oil on the band.

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On 11/8/2018 at 7:11 AM, mikeyz123 said:

Thanks everyone for their feedback, my other question is how to adjust the emergency brake, not sure how to do it and i know it needs to be adjusted.

Get the factory shop manual for the 1949 and 50 Chrysler...easy to find online and use it to repair fix your car.

There are four different adjustment procedures on your external E-brake band and cable.

Check your cable at the bell housing @ the cross member for fraying damage separation too.

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9 hours ago, mikeyz123 said:

I have a blown head gasket, is anyone aware on how to remove the head and what steps and or precautions i have to take prior to removing the head.

 

You need a shop manual. Many of us could tell you from memory the basics, but on many engines there are little "gotcha's" that will get you without a shop manual whether or not you have done them before.

As a basic starting point - label things. It is all too easy to put a long bolt in a short hole during reassembly. It is all too easy not to notice that Part A must come off to get Part B off. It is all too easy not to "iron" the head flat  when torquing bolts.

Even though I have replaced my share of head gaskets on old engines I want a manual to give me reminders as to the hidden problems that may be  present on a particular make or model.

The cost of a shop manual will save you at least that much frustration on the first repair you do - honest......

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Hey guys, so i have taken my engine head off and been waiting for head gasket so i can replace it, but i was told to check for sticky valves, not sure how to do that does anyone have an idea.

thanks

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 If you think that you have sticky valves, you can spray penetrating oil down the valve stems while the valve is open.

The side of the engine has a cover that encloses the lifters. Take that off and spray the lifters and stems of the valves.

 It may help if somebody cranks the engine over when spraying the lifters.

 This advice is general in nature and your engine may be different.

 

 Not to insult you, but it seems that you know next to nothing about engines. You could do more harm than good.

  When I was 18, I knew nothing about automatic transmissions and when I broke my reverse band on my 55 Chrysler, I bought the shop manual and studied it. Low and behold. it turned out to be much simpler than I had imagined. There was a simple trick that I never would have thought of on my own. I didn't even have to remove the transmission that I was going to do!

 

 Buy the car makers manual, study it before you make an oops!

 

http://www.faxonautoliterature.com/1949-1950-Chrysler-Repair-Shop-Manual-Reprint-P10100.aspx

 

Edited by Roger Walling (see edit history)
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6 hours ago, mikeyz123 said:

Hey guys, so i have taken my engine head off and been waiting for head gasket so i can replace it, but i was told to check for sticky valves, not sure how to do that does anyone have an idea.

thanks

 

With the head off it should be easy to turn the engine over by hand.

If all of the valves open and close then none are stuck.

You will know right away if one or more do not close.

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Why did you take the head off for a slow cranking problem?  Did you do a compression test to determine there was a problem?  Slow fire up on an older carbureted car is usually just the fuel has evaporated from the carb bowl and it takes a little cranking to get fuel back up to the carb.  When you get the head back on, let us know what is going on.  More complicated now because we also have to diagnose the original problem plus what may have gone wrong in installing a new head gasket.  Lots of great guys on here willing to help, but don't jump ahead of us. Stay with us.

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I took the head off because i had a blown head gasket. I read that since the engine head is off i should check for leaky valves. Im assuming the bolts on the lefthand side of the engine are what i need to take off?

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Make sure to check the head with a straight edge.

You don't want more that a couple of thousandths of warpage.

The block could also show some out of square but its a lot more to deal with if its out to far.

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3 hours ago, mikeyz123 said:

Why is that? I did use them, i used a cast iron rated one.

THE USE OF "SURFACE CONDITIONING DISCS" -
WHEN CLEANING ENGINE GASKET SEALING SURFACES, AND/OR CLEANING PARTS FROM AN ENGINE WHICH ARE TO BE REUSED; SURFACE CONDITIONING DISCS (TYPICALLY A WOVEN FIBER PAD DESIGN) WHICH CONTAIN ABRASIVES, SUCH AS A HIGH AMOUNT OF ALUMINUM OXIDE, ARE NOT RECOMMENDED.
THE USE OF SUCH SURFACE CONDITIONING DISCS DISLODGE ALUMINUM OXIDE (FROM THE DISC) AND METAL PARTICLES, WHICH CAN LEAD TO PREMATURE ENGINE BEARING FAILURE.
THE PRESENCE OF ALUMINUM OXIDE IN ENGINE OIL HAS BEEN SHOWN TO CAUSE PREMATURE ENGINE BEARING FAILURE. IN SOME CASES THIS FAILURE OCCURS IN AS LITTLE AS 1,000 MILES (2,200 KM) OR LESS AFTER THE REPAIR HAS BEEN MADE.
SURFACE CONDITIONING DISCS MAY GRIND THE COMPONENT PART MATERIAL AND IMBED IT INTO THE DISC. THIS CAN RESULT WHEN MORE AGGRESSIVE GRINDING OF THE GASKET SURFACE TAKES PLACE.

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