Crazyfamily

1927 Buick Standard (27/27)

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Hello and a huge thank you to those that have helped me thus far on the Buick/Prewar/Classic Cars Facebook pages!!

 

It comes as a suggestion for me to join this group of Buick lovers and I am Beyond excited to drive my car for the first time!

 

i purchased this ‘27 Standard about 3 months ago, already took my first trip to enjoy the vendors and show at Hershey (I’m only about 2 hrs away at times), and am looking forward to the thrill of owning a classic car and frankly getting to know you fine folks!

 

Ok onto my questions, I’ll keep it to just one for my first post!

 

my car has been sitting since Dec 2004 with gas in the tank, carb, SW Vacuum Fuel Pump, and lines (yummy!!).  We quickly determined we had a rotten top section of the fuel tank, so we built a brand new tank, baffles, and recessed end caps and all!  This coming week we will weld in the necks from the old tank and then line the tank!

 

So, onto another matter, the rear glass molding is kinda cracked up, would love to replace the molding...... Bob’s the best place for it?  Car looks too good for cracked up rubbers!

 

excuse the dust, I still have had no time to even wash her!!

 

more questions ahead but just an intro and one for now!

 

thanks again for the welcome and I hope to someday give more than I take from the group!

 

William 

 

 

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I’ve also removed, cleaned, and started rebuilding the SW Vacuum Fuel Pump.  I purchased a rebuild kit and will be painting the exterior of the housing before reinstalling.

 

Once the gas tank has her necks installed, the tank will be powder coated then lined in that order.

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That is a nice one and welcome to the group.  We are here to help.  Post lots of pictures.   I assume your first matter of business is starting the motor.  Here is a guide 

New Buick Owners Guide.

Welcome to Buick ownership.  Here are some tips to get you started.

The following books are necessary for Pre war Buick Ownership.   They come based on 4 cylinder or 6 cylinder models prior to 1925, or for Standard or Master 1925 and up.  Basically around 115” wheelbase is the smaller Buick series and 120 to 128” wheelbase is the larger Buick series. 

The Buick Heritage Alliance sells the following books.  The quality of the copies is only “fair” in many cases.  This may work for some people, depending on how many pieces your car is missing.  I suggest buying an original book if you can find it due to the better print quality.  

1)      The “Book of Parts” for your year.  

2)      The “Shop Manual” for your year

3)      The “reference book” for your year (of lesser importance if you can find a shop manual).

It is helpful in many cases to obtain copies of the parts books for 1 or 2 years before and after your model year.  Many times there is additional information or photos that will help with your understanding.

Note: Only a handful of parts used on a 4 cylinder model fit a 6 cylinder model.  Same with so few Standard parts will fit a Master.  The 4 cylinder line became the Standard, and the 6 cylinder line became the Master so there is interchangeability in that order.  Parts interchange is closest based on wheelbase of the models      

There is also available a big book of parts “Buick Master Parts List 1916-1932”.  This 3” thick book provides a listing of the years and models for each part.  You will have better luck finding a part knowing it’s year and model range rather than just looking for a single year.   This book does not have a lot of pictures and will not be a good substitute for the book of parts for your year, but I refer to this book frequently.

There are few exploded views of parts, so take a lot of photos and notes during disassembly. 

------------ Precautions------ THESE ARE NOT MODERN ENGINES------Damage can occur.

The first order is usually to see if the engine will turn over.  Do the following first.

1)      Pull the Water pump

 The water pump is on the side of the motor.  The issue is that the camshaft gear is fiber, and it drives the waterpump.  If the water pump is frozen or drags, it will destroy the timing gear.  Parts will fall in the engine.  The camshaft gears are expensive and new gears are not of the same quality as the originals.  The first order of business should be to pull the water pump and ensure it is operating correctly.    If you pull the waterpump, you can rotate the motor.   

 

Water pump shafts are usually steel.  The water pump bearings are bronze.  If the antifreeze was not cared for, the WP shaft could wear the bearings out quickly.  The WP seal is graphite packing.  The wear surface should be smooth and the packing should only be tight enough to prevent major leaks of the waterpump.  It should drip a little bit here and there.  If it does not, the packing is too tight.  Many people replace the shaft with a stainless steel shaft.

2)      Change the oil (and filter if it has one).  Strongly consider dropping the oil pan as well. 

An oil change is probably long overdue.   Don’t cut corners and skip dropping the pan.  Pre 1926 cars had no oil filter.  Non detergent oil was used for years, and there is likely a lot of sludge in the oil pan.  I have seen the oil pick up screens clogged from old oil, and this will starve the engine when it needs the oil most.  Bob’s Automobilia or Olsons Gaskets has an oil pan gasket set.

3)      Oil the Cylinders

Pull the spark plugs, put some oil in the cylinders.

4)      Pull the valve cover. 

Squirt oil on the rocker assembly.  Bump the rockers with a rubber mallet to ensure that all the valves move.  Drip oil on the valve stems

After doing the above 4 items, you could rotate the motor, even crank it with the starter.  It would be great to get a compression tester.  Around 60 lbs pressure in each cylinder is a good motor.  There should be less than 10% deviation in each cylinder.     

Cranking the motor is a good thing to check off the list.  A compression test gives a good check on the health of the motor. 

Preparing for starting:

1)      Pull the carburetor. 

a)      Clean out the bowl. 

b)      Use carburetor cleaner to ensure all internal passages blow thru. 

c)       Consider installing a Nytril float – available from Bob’s. 

d)      Check that the air valve lays smooth against the carburetor inside diameter and that there is a gap at the base of the air valve.  You may need to file the pot metal venturi block.

2)      Check that the exhaust valve is open.

3)      Rebuild the distributor.

4)      Rebuild the Water pump. (see the forum for upgrades to the seals and shaft).

5)      The fan hub is an old design that requires frequent oiling and will leak oil all over the motor.  Replace it with a sealed bearing hub – Several suppliers for this.  Search the Forum “fan hub”.

6)      Rebuild the vacuum tank and gas tank * I prefer to do the “fuel supply” system later as there is a lot to this.  For a first start, I hang a 1 quart used lawnmower tank and feed the carburetor with this from a reinforced rubber fuel hose.   

 

Other notes:

Oil and grease is usually long overdue for removing the old and installing new (and not just installing new.)  Clean out as much of the old as you can first.

The firing order is 142635.  (Reverse of a modern engine).

 

Hugh

 

Edited by Hubert_25-25 (see edit history)
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Great info Hugh, a very detailed list like this is greatly appreciated!  The car had a frame off restoration (aside from interior) prior to 2004 when the owner passed away.

 

i have a bunch of receipts  from Bob’s from the restoration so I am curious to how much of the “upgrades” have been done already.

 

i am glad you included a detailed list as I wouldn’t have thought about the water pump and removing the oil pan!  The oil came out smooth and clean!   

 

I took plugs out and and they were clean, sprayed GM Rust Penatrant into each cylinder and let it sit a week and then repeated two additional times then I used the hand crank and it turned over like silk!! Smooth as can be.....

 

it it has a oil filler (AC) that I’ll take a peak into this weekend as well!

 

ill check compreasion this weekend and remove the carb.  I just rebuilt the SW Vacuum Fuel pump and cleaned all the fuel lines using a dry high pressure steam and boy were they nasty!  Aside from the fuel system everything looks clean, besides the grease drippings lol but according to a coworker at the dealership that has rebuilt three of these cars, the drips are a sign of a well taken care of car!!

 

Thanks again for the advice and I am all ears to much more!!!!! I appreciate it!!

 

ill post some more pics, of course disregard the dust!

 

william 

 

 I work at a large Chevrolet Buick GMC dealership so everyone and their brother wanted to see the car and jump into it!

 

 

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These pics were taken when I first brought the car to the dealership before touching a thing.

 

it still sits covered in dust, I don’t plan on detailing the car till it’s drivable!

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William,   Congratulations on your new purchase.   The four door  sedan,  Model  27 -27  was the second most popular Buick in 1927,  with a production  of 40,272  for domestic sales and a further 1,448 for export,  out of a total production of 255,160.   This figure was not passed again until 1940.  

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Thanks Rod!

 

i am beyond excited to learn more about these cars and hopefully one day give back to the community more than I take from it!

 

My Wife, two Sons, and I are all motorcycle  enthusiasts so put till purchasing this ‘27 all of our “free time”.....lol yeah like we have much of that....has been spent enjoying our bikes and boating!  So the four of us are excited to hopefully start enjoying the car!

 

its been 20 years since I have had a car that I’d call a “hobby car” but with my OCD and Adult ADD I tend to throw myself into a project and obsess over it so you’ll be seeing a lot of me around here!

 

As I mentioned, the car had a frame off restoration prior to 2004 and seems to be very clean aside from the 91 year old original interior!  I love that it’s original but as nice as the rest of the car is it is going to be extremely hard to show some restraint in not having a new interior put in her I’ll be honest!!

 

As I see from the FB pages and on here, I like so many have some broken pot metal handles and knobs..... including a frozen headlight switch and it’s lever was broken off by a “friend” of mine before I ever purchased the car the day he went with me to see it!!  Thanks a lot “friend” I said to him, along with “with friends like you who needs enemies!”  Joking of course!

 

i did hit the headlight switch with a little line from the backside of it hoping that as it sits this week that who knows maybe it will free up and maybe I won’t have to risk damaging anything and not have to remove it!!  I doubt I will get it free without removing the entire headlight/Ignition switch housing/assembly but my fingers are crossed!!

 

i also GREATLY appreciate the list of “must do’s and don’ts Hugh and I am will follow it to a T!  Quick question, it seems that the engine was very clean (forgot to mention I looked into each cylinder with a high definition bore scope before turning it over and after dousing the cylinders with rust penetrating fluid and turning engine over with the hand crank.... of course with the spark plugs removed and it seemed to turn  over very very smoothly!!!  So is there a way to know if the water pump was gone through and updated parts were installed without removing the water pump it’s self?

 

william 

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William, 

      The pot metal was the culprit and not your friend.  It's not just the pot metal switch handles that are bad, but also the round pot metal housing that holds the handles.  The housing can even grow into the dashboard.  If you just replace the handles, it is only a matter of time before the housing grabs the new handles and seizes them.  Bobs sells new housing and handles.  

 

Myers early Dodge is the US rep for www.vintageclassidreproductions.com  They have handles but I do not know if they are correct for your car.  Double check the dimensions.  If they are not correct, I have a casting company that you could use.  Standard models and Master models have different size handles.

 

Apparently your water pump is spinning if you are turning the motor over.  Since that is the case, I would just use 50/50 antifreeze (green) and see how it does.  

 

Since you put so much penetrating oil in the cylinders, you really need to get some oil in there prior to starting as there is very little in the way of lubrication provided by penetrating lube.  

It looks like you found a good Buick to start with.

Hugh

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Yeah the engine turned over by crank very easy, easier than I thought it would.  The prev owner was pretty meticulous.  I know his Widow well and she is my Sister’s neighbor.

 

she told me where they got the car and somewhat of how it came to be theirs, but of course I’d love to know it’s entirw history!!!  Funny story, my Carfax rep came into my dealership a few weeks ago, I had the ‘wm27 paperwork on my desk and she said “Cool, let’s run it thru Carfax!”

 

hahahahaha, yeah, I showed her how many digits in the Vin..... she smiled and said “Talk to you later!” ??‍♂️?

 

but yes Car turned over easily so I agree, I’ll move forward cautiously and just finish fuel system, tank, carb, lines, oil, and coolant and give her a try!!

 

btw, what’s the secret to removing the wiper motor handle, it’s of course frozen in place too!! And I don’t want to break anything!

 

**Thanks so much for your kind offer to use your mold for handles, I’ve been reading about the foundry and the process of the molds so I greatly appreciate that, should I go that route or buy them from bob’s?  I believe he does have those switch levers too for my car.

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Curious if anyone responded about sources for stone grilles.  I have a 1929 Cadillac that could use one as well.  Hoping someone is making them.

 

David

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This one looks like a home made one. As you look at it, the corners on the left side are not symmetrical with the right side and the curves on the top are not  smooth like something made as a production piece. Who ever made it did a good job and I would love to have it on my car. 

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I just recently finished restoring my honeycomb radiator and nickel plated shell for my 1925 Standard.  The radiator lays against the back side of shell.  The inner shroud holds it all in place with 10 counter sunk screws.  Installing a stone guard would be a challenge regarding mounting and doing it right.  You would need some plastic to protect finishes.  Something that they did not have back in the day.  I think if you want a stone guard, you have to make one yourself and determine how you want to secure it.     Hugh  

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Hugh a few years ago when I restored a 1928 Chrysler and made the stone guard for it and used 4 clips little  that fit between the rad and the shell. It didn't take much to keep it in place. It didn't have the same complicated curves that would look good on a Buick but its doable for a Buick. 

Wayne

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