roaringtwenties

Wanted ANY Pre-1929 touring car (Please read for insight)

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Greetings and Salutations!

 

This is my first post so I apologize if I "sound kind of new". I have always wanted a prewar touring car, I felt in love with them around twelve years ago, and I decided to get one. I do not have a high income so I have a budget in mind: Over the past four years I have been saving up $3,000 for a pre 1929 touring car (my dream). I have been scavenging the internet on sites such as Craigslist, Hemmings classifieds, and car from uk. (I am not from the UK, I live in Pennsylvania.) I just want a touring car (not coupe) that is complete (not looking for a particular model), has paperwork, the interior is in alright condition, and runs "well enough" to drive and stop. I don't care if the paint is falling off or if the car is in need of restoration, as I acknowledge it is near impossible to get a touring car for under $3,000 in pristine condition. I have a team of friends that work in a classic car restoration shop and I have worked on their cars before. They would be happy to help me get a rusty touring car in great condition as long as it is running. I decided it was time to post a topic in a forum, rather than search around craigslist as I cannot find anything suitable. I have contacted around 200 people now, and half of them don't even bother to reply back via text, email, or call. The others seemed very shady with what they were offering. All the touring automobiles with paperwork were just in such a horrible state that I could not restore without spending an unimaginable time restoring. (They were in complete parts, covered in 100% rust, the interiors were beyond ruin, and I would have to buy many spare parts.) I would like to stay under $3,000 as I would still need extra money in order to restore the car, but I simply can't go above $3,000. I want to but I just don't have the money. 

 

Thank you so much for reading this, and I hope to hear your comments soon with perhaps some offers!

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If you come up in price a bit more you'll have a better shot. 95% of this car is there ready to finish... good starter. Won't last long. ..

I don't care for Fords but that's a good deal IMO

 

https://redding.craigslist.org/cto/d/1921-ford-model-touring/6720651166.html

 

1

Edited by 30DodgePanel (see edit history)

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I'm 67 years young.

The first car I fell in love with was an original 1911 Ford Model T Touring car the local Ford dealer's father had purchased.

To make a long story short I was 58 years old before I acquired my first collector car, a 1920 Model T coupe.

I was involved in old tractors (teens and twenties primarily) but wound up suffering severe burnout on them (another long story).

At any rate once I had that one I needed a 4 passenger car once I realized how much fun it would be to take friends along now and then and acquired a 1919 Model T Touring which I loved.

To make yet another long story story short my dream car (the one in my avatar) came up and I said good bye to it and 2 others.

I've regretted 3 or 4 buys, which I unloaded, but I will never regret this one.

Good luck.

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$3000 is not much of a budget to purchase or restore any collector car. I would suggest saving the $3000 and adding to your fund. It may take a few years but will pay you large dividends in the future. Remember restoration is expensive. Even if you do your own work. Just my 2 cents.

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Everyone will accuse me of dumping on you're parade but we get this question alot and reality is reality. It is always cheaper to buy a good car up front rather than restore one even if you have friends to help. I doubt your friends are going to finance the restoration and while their occasional help might be free I bet they wont do the whole job for you. YOu will spend $1000 just on paint plus five or ten times that much on interior plus five or ten times that much on an engine rebuild plus another big pile of money for little stuff like nuts and bolts and hoses and tires etc etc etc. A $3000 car is going to need very expensive work and alot of time before it is ready to enjoy. It isnt 1978 anymore. You're $3000 up front will be a small drop in a big bucket by the time its finished. If you spend more at first and get a better car when you start then you can have fun right away and any additional checks written will be much smaller and pay off bigger. Alot of us here get tricked by the idea that with some buddys and some elbowgrease we can make a junky car into a good car. What it really takes is cold hard cash no matter how good you are. There are alot of things on a restoration that you just cant do yourself.

 

I would say keep saving for a while longer and buy a good car. You can get a decent Model T touring car for maybe $10,000. A $3000 car will take more than $7000 to make it into that $10,000 car if you get what I mean.

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Some early cars will show up at lower prices because they don’t have much of a following and parts for them a hard to find. Early Fords are your best bet for cars available and ready access to parts.  Dodge Brothers seem to have a good following too.  Good luck with your search!

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You might want to post your location with your avitar so people can find it with a quick glance.   With a $3000 budget it will have to be a somewhat local car as something across the country will cost a minimum of $1000 and more like $1500 or more to get shipped across the country.  I do have to say I haven't seen a whole lot of running cars in any configuration for 3000 in the recent past,  but stuff does pop up every now and then.  A set of new tires will run you I believe 600 or more for blackwalls and tubes.  All things to consider when buying as you will eventually need to have that money to replace them unless they were recently replaced.   Will keep my eyes out around here in NY state and lower new England which should be close enough for you to chase one down if one comes available.  Good luck.

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)

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There is alot of ways to make a little extra change and even more on how to save it.  Little habits can be curtailed to add up to real money,  even that morning coffee and Doughnut or lunch out, etc.  (put it all in a jar and it will add up fast). Anyone can make a few bucks selling a few things on ebay or even craigslist. You may be able to horse trade your way into one as well.  Lots of guys would rather have a 60's car they can drive reliable than a 20's touring car that needs work.  (I'm the opposite but I would bet the numbers the other way is pretty high) 

I did a good search of a 200 mile radius of craigslist and couldn't find a thing under 5000 and most at 5 had the engine apart. Even with a little rust and not running they still want 5G.  Though you hit the 8G mark and some cars start popping up that fit the bill.  I know we don't want to discourage anyone from getting in the hobby but I just don't see any way to find anything running under 3G.  Best bet might be to put an add on craigslist and state exactly what you are looking for.  It's rare but you might find someone willing to cut one loose to a restorer so it doesn't get hot rodded.  If you could find an old collector that had one he never got to,  but a bunch he has done,  that needs a little help with stuff,  you might be able to build a friendship and work that angle.   It's a long shot but a possibility.  Remember though,  that sometimes the most expensive restoration,  ends up being the car you got for free or very little as they are usually priced accordingly. 

Good luck.

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)
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I have always wanted a prewar touring car, I felt in love with them around twelve years ago, and I decided to get one. I do not have a high income so I have a budget in mind:

Model T is most economical touring car.

Here is one for $6900, this is the bottom, anything less is a pile of parts.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1917-Ford-Model-T/183464526514?hash=item2ab75682b2:g:6HAAAOSwwb1bsvMv:rk:5:pf:1&vxp=mtr&frcectupt=true

 

ModelT.jpg

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I’m in PA too so I’ve been looking in the weekly farming related newspaper I get as they have a for sale section that includes some really unusual stuff.  For example 1999 Lincoln runs & drives for $2500, a Chevy S10 for $2800, lots of old tractors for $3k or less and a 1936 Ford Woody wagon for $55,000.  No touring cars in the range the poster wants.  Many times Ford T stuff shows up so I’ll keep looking.

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Here's how a person could get the impression the $3000 touring car was a reality. Look at a copy of The Standard Catalog of American Cars, Vol. 1, 1805-1942. See they have thumbnail  value estimates of most cars in there: there are Ford touring cars for $1,500-3,000, a 1906 Duryea for $2,600, and even a '24 Duesenberg for $9,900. THE CATCH is that they are all Condition #4 and #5...also it's a wild estimate from a 22-year-old book, often of cars that don't exist. You're not gonna find an ought-six Duryea, even in junkyard condition in that range.

 

The good news is, you live in the best part of the whole USA to find antique cars and people to help you with them. Also, the comments above all sound true. You might find a car in your price range somewhere........but you'll be buying yourself a bit of work, too. Maybe that's what you want. Maybe a farm auction that has 2 or 3 cars in it, or an online antique car sale site(there are a lot).

 

 Here's a car from a Saskatchewan farm auction 2 months ago that might have sold for 2 or 3 thousand, and another one I would expect fetched double that. Which would you rather have?

 

3.jpg1917 Ford

88.jpg1924 Ford Touring

Edited by jeff_a (see edit history)
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I found this one which almost fits the bill and shows you what 3G will buy in NY state,  next door to you. 

It's not running though and turns over,  plus is missing the actual coachwork.   I will say the fenders look pretty good though. You will probably pay almost as much again for a body that's worth anything.  Then it's still not running.   That can be $500 to $5000

https://longisland.craigslist.org/cto/d/1923-model/6716609704.html

 

01515_bT5rjf6YFh0_600x450.jpg

00c0c_dXOwBabFgV6_600x450.jpg

Edited by auburnseeker (see edit history)

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While I believe that most of the advice given here is well intended I would encourage you to keep looking and keep saving. $3,000 is probably a stretch but it may not be impossible. My observation over the past few years is that 99% of the people who participate in this forum are motivated by the desire to "show" a car. If I were just starting out and took the advice rendered here seriously, I'd have just given up. Fortunately, I spent 20 years in the old car world starting in my 20s so I realized that much of what I was reading was based on presumptions I didn't share. I wanted a larger than average, pre-1912 car... I settled for one that needs a tremendous amount of work but I have both time and the machines where I simply don't have, and never will have, the sort of money in the amounts bandied about here. There are always compromises to be made but if you are realistic about that and prepared to do a lot of work yourself a great deal can be accomplished on a limited budget. The late teens and early 20s are an excellent place to look... I'd keep an eye out for obscure makes rather than the well known and popular ones. Those cars are frequently difficult to sell. But... you will have to do a lot of homework. Your friends are unlikely to have much working knowledge of the period and the internet is a weak, if not a hopeless tool for real research. When you look at a car... ask yourself if all the major components are there...does it turn over (whether it runs is greatly overrated). I wouldn't be put off by a car with a stuck engine but I have a lot of experience with that sort of problem. And, for whatever its worth, I'm completely self-taught in this subject and come from a family where no one shared this interest so if the motivation is there, I believe you will eventually succeed.

Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)

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Non running engines are huge gambles.  Now when I look at a car for sale,  that is priced according to one that should have a good engine, I bring a noncontact thermometer, I make sure it comes up to temperature,  doesn't overheat,  runs well, and smooth,  Starts well cold or hot.  I guess I'm just getting fussy But rebuilding the engines in the last two cars I had which wasn't planned for,  tends to make you think that if it's not running and maybe turns over,  then buy it according to it needing to be rebuilt.  If you win and it only needs something minor then great,  I'm sure you will find some other unexpected unpleasent surprise that will eat up that savings.  I usually find the bad engine and then the other surprise as a bonus. 

Most of these cars were parked for a reason,  many were just worn out. 

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I have been doing this for sixty years and I will say what you want is do able but not likely.  The first thing you need to do is join a club or chapter and meet the people.  You need to join a club where the members work on their cars and understand how to evaluate a car.  You want some one who can go with you to evaluate the car.  You seem to be looking at "T" but could you evaluate a "T" and drive it.  What ever you buy will probably need tires which is another $500 up front.  The touring you listed requires a top and interior.  Have you ever installed these.  The touring listed says engine rebuilt but does not a  have a coil box.  I would suggest you start a little smaller in a speedster and learn the ropes, trade it or sell it and move up the ladder.  Another advantage to a club is that a member may have a car they are not using which they will allow you to purchase more in your budget.

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I was offered this 1928 Chevrolet at $4,500, I am on the fence. It is not local so I am gambling the wood is decent and the engine ok.

 

dont think that is much of a gamble. looks like a real fair offer, if its the car you want.

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1 hour ago, mercer09 said:

I was offered this 1928 Chevrolet at $4,500, I am on the fence. It is not local so I am gambling the wood is decent and the engine ok.

 

dont think that is much of a gamble. looks like a real fair offer, if its the car you want.

Probably like most of us,  It isn't his absolute dream car and other examples are available,  probably for not alot more that are a little better.  Craigslist is littered with cars I like every day,  but few I wonder how I'm going to pay for it , get it in the garage and if someone else will buy it before I can come up with enough money. 

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