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Simnut

If I were to sell my '23 Buick Model 41.......

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As some of you may know, I bought this car originally as a '26 2 door sedan which I was going to hot rod.  But, after some research etc. I found out it was a '23-6-41 of which only 8700 were made that year.  This driver should not be compromised!  I still have my eyes set on something to hot rod and I don't believe my financial advisor , aka wife...will be conducive to two projects going at once.  It comes down to two choices, which I am alright with doing.  Sell this one and find a hot rod candidate OR spend the winter getting this one all neat and tidy and drive her as is for the next summer. 

 

If I was to sell or advertise to sell....how would a guy go about doing this?  How do you put a value on this car and where would you advertise ? Many thanks in advance!

 

Harry

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8 minutes ago, GARY F said:

You do not say the make of the car but advertise on here under cars for sale.

 

It is a Buick.

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If you were going for a correct or standard period hot rod, it would seem a Ford is the choice of most.  Then again, I'm not sure it is correct for me to assume any hot rod is standard or correct when using a Ford body.  I think the Fords were the candidate of choice because they were so plentiful and cheap back in the day.  I would assume there is more familiarity with more common modifications on the Fords as well.

 

I would guess that getting your current project in driver form would be less expensive and take less time to perform.  Put that to a vote with your financial adviser and see where the majority opinion lies!

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I restored a '23 Buick and found a very easy car to work on. It also was a nice car to drive. 

 

It won't take a lot of bucks to restore the car to original condition. I'd give it a go. 

 

Drive an original '23 Buick for donuts and coffee - you get lots of waves, people honk their horns and lookee-loos tell you what a neat car you have.  Drive a hot rod and you won't get near that attention.

 

Just my advice. Restore it right and drive a time machine. It's quite an experience.

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A 1923 Buick it not the car to Hot Rod, nobody did it back in the day, and it just would look out of place today. Sell it and buy a Ford, the world is full of unfinished Ford projects. Bob 

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)

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Harry, thank you for wanting to preserve the car.

You definitely should put a price on the car, because

many people won't answer ads without prices.

And include PLENTY of pictures if you advertise on

the internet.

 

Here are some good places to advertise a pre-war 

car such as yours:

 

---The magazine of the Buick Club of America.

There are some dedicated pre-war fans there.

 

---The Buick buy-sell part of the AACA forum.

The exposure isn't extensive on any part of our AACA forum,

but target the true Buick fans there--and it's free.

 

---The website of the Horseless Carriage Club of America.

(www.hcca.org).  Even though it's post-1915, it will get

good exposure there.

 

---Hemmings Motor News (magazine and website).

Always the premier place to reach serious car fans.

 

---The website www.prewarcar.com.  Focuses on pre-war cars.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)
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The federal reserve says 2.25% is a fair rate on investments. Just take what you have in the car and multiply by 1.025.

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3 hours ago, mercer09 said:

given your location-keep what you have and enjoy it.

 

target audience may be limited.

Oh, I wouldn't mind doing a road trip with trailer and car ;)  I love driving......

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On 10/6/2018 at 12:26 PM, Simnut said:

spend the winter getting this one all neat and tidy and drive her as is for the next summer. 

 

 

 

 

Good idea ! As long as you already have the car, get to know it and  master it's operation. If you find that you don't love it, then sell it as a turn key antique car. Have fun !    -   Carl 

 

P.S.   Do you ever get down to Seattle ?

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Lots of hobby car interest in B.C. We just face a very up hill battle south of the border due to our lame $. And depending on the car's paperwork status, legal removal from the U.S. can be a bit of an expensive exercise in frustration. 

  Is a U.S. Buick or a Canadian McLaughlin ? Nearly the same car except for the radiator badge and a few details. Canadians generally prefer McLaughlin's , however there are a few 1920's Buicks on this side of the border. Market value is roughly the same. I was at a automotive swap meet just yesterday in Monroe WA. slightly NE. of Seattle. A few decent deals however nothing tempting enough to make me bite. The Spring version of the same event usually has more to chose from.

 

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

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19 hours ago, C Carl said:

 

Good idea ! As long as you already have the car, get to know it and  master it's operation. If you find that you don't love it, then sell it as a turn key antique car. Have fun !    -   Carl 

 

P.S.   Do you ever get down to Seattle ?

 

  As often as I can!  Been to the Museum of Flight numerous times, Boeing Field....or just a relaxing weekend in Seattle.  Aviation is deep deep passion of mine as you can tell . 

 

I actually started checking the mechanicals of the car yesterday.  I'm starting at the four corners, the wheels and hubs..then follow the drive train to the radiator.  Not sure if you know but she drives as of now, I just have to make sure the brakes are as good as they can get..the engine is well looked after.  Then I will work on the interior.  Like you said...get to know her.

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18 hours ago, 1912Staver said:

Lots of hobby car interest in B.C. We just face a very up hill battle south of the border due to our lame $. And depending on the car's paperwork status, legal removal from the U.S. can be a bit of an expensive exercise in frustration. 

  Is a U.S. Buick or a Canadian McLaughlin ? Nearly the same car except for the radiator badge and a few details. Canadians generally prefer McLaughlin's , however there are a few 1920's Buicks on this side of the border. Market value is roughly the same. I was at a automotive swap meet just yesterday in Monroe WA. slightly NE. of Seattle. A few decent deals however nothing tempting enough to make me bite. The Spring version of the same event usually has more to chose from.

 

Greg

 

Hey Greg!  She's a Flint built Buick , with a body by Fischer Body Corporation.   An interesting find from within her was a 1923 Alberta license plate...am trying hard to find out if it's her first plate.  That's a tough road to travel though..will have to go through the courts in Alberta to get that info....not impossible though.   GM Corporate is trying to find out where this particular car was shipped to for original sale.  I'm hoping this will help me with the provenance of the car.  It was $2000 new in 1923 so it may be someone notable owned it at first.  

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It is possible that low production body styles were only built in the U.S. and Canadian market cars were simply imported by GM of Canada. The McLaughlin club would probably know.  Not much point setting up production in Canada for a body style that might only sell a few dozen units. 1922 and 1923 cars are very similar, 1924 was a complete re-design.

 1922 is the newest year that the standard reference on Canadian cars "Cars of Canada" by Durnford and Baechler gives a body style breakdown. There was a McLaughlin 2 door sedan offered in 1922 { $3000.00 in the Canadian market  , quite a bit more than the U.S. Buick price}. For 1923 GM of Canada was taking a more hands on approach to the Canadian GM market { away from McLaughlin } and they may have rationalised production. 

 

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

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26 minutes ago, 1912Staver said:

It is possible that low production body styles were only built in the U.S. and Canadian market cars were simply imported by GM of Canada. The McLaughlin club would probably know.  Not much point setting up production in Canada for a body style that might only sell a few dozen units. 1922 and 1923 cars are very similar, 1924 was a complete re-design.

 1922 is the newest year that the standard reference on Canadian cars "Cars of Canada" by Durnford and Baechler gives a body style breakdown. There was a McLaughlin 2 door sedan offered in 1922 { $3000.00 in the Canadian market  , quite a bit more than the U.S. Buick price}. For 1923 GM of Canada was taking a more hands on approach to the Canadian GM market { away from McLaughlin } and they may have rationalised production. 

 

Greg

I will have to do some more research on that .....just what I need ;)

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I been around hot rod and restore Buicks all my life , they are nice restored or street rod. The only problem with the 20's Buicks is the rear suspension on the larger Buicks , the small standard Buicks had the rearend mounted in the center of the leaf spring.

If you restore or street rod the Buick or sell and another car , get your wife to help you.with the project install, A/C , power brakes, steering.that way she can enjoy it to.

 

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I think I would try driving a Hot Rod first to see if you even like it. You may sell this and get one and find out you don't even like it. A good number of rods have been built by a novice that just put stuff together in a hap hazard manor and that is why it is now for sale as they don't like the way it came out. It is your choice but I would keep the original Buick and have fun.

  

Edited by Dandy Dave (see edit history)
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