DB26

1926 Dodge Brothers - Adjusting Emergency Brake (Brake Rod Frozen)

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 Update in my other post below, one of the brake rods is frozen in place. 

 

Hello everyone,

 

Over the past year I've done many things to my 1926 Dodge. I've changed out the gear oil in the differential and transmission to the correct type, rebuilt the water pump and carburetor as well as many other small things. Now it has finally come time to really stretch her legs and see how she does on the open road, but I want to tackle one thing before I do that and that is the brakes. The foot brake has been working well so far, and I think that will only require minor adjustment. My main question is about the emergency brake. According to the manual the only adjustment is at the yolk:

 

IMG_2788.thumb.PNG.a9c947d5ce754d4229e8c467d2667845.PNG

 

I was under the impression I would have to remove the wheel and turn some bolts and screws in order to get the proper adjustment.

 

Is it really that simple?

Edited by DB26
New info (see edit history)

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I don't see how the emergency brake would wear?

 

 All it does is stop the car from rolling away.

 

Ray.

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Yeah good idea. I wouldn't have the heart to cut anything on this car. 

 

My hand brake currently doesn't work at all. Pull the lever and nothing. 

Edited by DB26 (see edit history)

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The e-brakes had the same friction material as the service brake on my car and the internal shoes are not that much smaller than the surface area of the service brakes.  As such, I can lock up the rear wheels with either but I find the e-brake harder to modulate.  I don't use them normally but I did test them because it's good to have a redundant braking system.   There isn't much to adjust (just the one bolt on the right to center the assy) but you do want to check that the pins on the internal linkage are in good shape.  New ones are available at Myers.  Otherwise, the adjustment is done at the front clevis.

PC312346.JPG

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Just the information I was looking for, thank you. I'll be doing this project in the near future.  

 

Am I going to need a hub puller?  I saw that referenced in another thread about brakes on the 26. 

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I'm pretty sure you will.  It may not appear so in the photo but this is a tapered end on the axle and tapered joints can be really tight.

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Okay I just back inside from working on the Dodge. I got underneath the rear end and the driver side emergency brake connecting rod is seized in place. The passenger side moves freely. This might be why I have no hand brake. The driver side is stuck in place somewhere in the middle of its travel. Not fully at rest, but not fully engaged. I tried penetrating lube and beating on her, but she wouldn't budge. I took the wheel off and the hub just slid right off. No fight. Castle nut wasn't even tight, a bit loose actually. I Was able to remove the cotter pin and unscrew the castle nut by hand. I yanked on the hub and she came off along with the key. I will get pictures of the inside tomorrow. Pretty dry and dirty. Some rust as well. Gonna try to free up the rod soon. 

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Okay, update for today

 

with a lot of heat and a lot of banging, she moved. Barely. The rod is still very very very tight and it takes a hammer for it to move. I hope I'm able to get it to free up. 

 

IMG_2868.thumb.JPG.3a28d73e51973375954bafd1c0e5efde.JPG

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7 minutes ago, Wheelmang said:

I have a couple spares. Let me know if you need one.

I might. I haven't mentioned this yet but the other end of the rod where it connects to the differential has a big bronze or brass glob like it's been broken and repaired before.

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I have been trying to remember all night.  Finally the squirrel got up to speed.  Many people here recommend a 50/50 mixture of ATF and acetone as the worlds best penetrant.

Remember too that WD 40 is a penetrant (not a very good one) not a lubricant. 

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Success! She is free and working again. Now I just need to reline with new material. That will be at a later date. I did the candle wax trick and that seemed to help a lot. After many sessions of heating / waxing / turning / heating / penetrant / turning / heating / turning. I didn't get pics because I was in a rush to get it done before the forecasted rain comes in. Plus dirty hands. I might still want to replace that rod because it's definetly snapped before.  

 

Thanks for the tip on penetrant. I will have to mix some up one day I have heard about this tip from many many other people. For the record I used Kroil on this project. 

Edited by DB26 (see edit history)

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Question. How tight do I need to tighten the castle nut? The way I did it was to tighten the nut snug and then back it off until the hole for the cotter pin is exposed. Should it be tighter since it's a taper fit? 

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I thought so. There is already some wear from the previous owner tightening them like modern style front spindle drum brakes. Hopefully it won't cause any issues. 

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