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Sounds like you are going to end up with an out of state registration and title that needs to be out of state forever. Check with your state  DMV on residency requirements for titles and check with your insurance company. Usually you have 30 or 60 days to get it registered in your state.

 

I can think of a lot of things that could go wrong

 

Just my two cents

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Xander;

 

Did you check this out yourself as suggested on the website?

 

Not sure if this is legit?
Check out our reviews from Facebook & Google ! We will even add the links below to make that extra step easier.
https://www.titlegods.com/reviews

 

I have no idea whether or not it's legit.  Maybe, since you live in Idaho, you might ask the company ("titlegods") for some in-state references.  You might even be personally acquainted with one or more of the references.

 

Just my $0.02.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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been driving my classics for years with VT tags.

 

nobody cares unless you have a neighbor out to get you..............

 

nothing greater then to fear fear itself.

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12 minutes ago, mercer09 said:

been driving my classics for years with VT tags.

 

nobody cares unless you have a neighbor out to get you..............

 

nothing greater then to fear fear itself.

 

What's "VT";  Virginia Tech, Valley Transit or the State of Vermont?  If it's the State of Vermont, what's wrong with driving your classics around with Vermont tags?  I'm in a State of Confusion over your post.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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1 hour ago, capngrog said:

Xander;

 

Did you check this out yourself as suggested on the website?

 

Not sure if this is legit?
Check out our reviews from Facebook & Google ! We will even add the links below to make that extra step easier.
https://www.titlegods.com/reviews

 

I have no idea whether or not it's legit.  Maybe, since you live in Idaho, you might ask the company ("titlegods") for some in-state references.  You might even be personally acquainted with one or more of the references.

 

Just my $0.02.

 

Cheers,

Grog

I never looked at any website. 

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I have known several folks who got titles through a legal process, (perhaps like this one?) In effect, you legally SELL your car via bill-of-sale to someone who lives in a state where titles are not required for very old vehicles. The person you sold it to (you really did sell it to them, legally), then takes your notarized Bill-of-Sale to his state registrar, and gets a new title from that state for that vehicle issued to him/her in their name. Then, they legally SELL your car back to you, through the mail. They send you the title signed and notarized out of their name, along with a notarized Bill-of-Sale. You then take the title to a notary in your state, who witnesses your signature being legally applied to the new out-of-state title. Here in Ohio, you must then take the car and the title to a new-car dealership where it is inspected to make sure the VIN on the vehicle matches the VIN on the title, etc, etc. After this inspection, the registrar in Ohio will issue you an Ohio title in your name. 

 

Could anything go wrong? Sure! Maybe the buyer skips out of town with your money, and has your signed Bill-of-Sale. (Indeed, there are lots of ways to be cheated in a car-sale transaction, with or without a title). Worse yet, maybe the vehicle you bought without a title was listed as stolen years ago (that's the biggest thing to worry about, in my opinion). But as I"ve stated before, I've seen this process work smoothly for several people over the years. 

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Before going this route, check with your DMV to see if they have a procedure to obtain a title for an "abandoned vehicle". (Hint hint, wink wink....) In Virginia it isn't too complicated, and the cost to apply was $25 the last time I looked.  

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47 minutes ago, Dave Henderson said:

Before going this route, check with your DMV to see if they have a procedure to obtain a title for an "abandoned vehicle". (Hint hint, wink wink....) In Virginia it isn't too complicated, and the cost to apply was $25 the last time I looked.  

THIS!  Most states have a documented process for dealing with lost titles, abandoned cars, etc.

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46 minutes ago, Dave Henderson said:

Before going this route, check with your DMV to see if they have a procedure to obtain a title for an "abandoned vehicle". (Hint hint, wink wink....) In Virginia it isn't too complicated, and the cost to apply was $25 the last time I looked.  

Hmmm... I can see Dave's point here. But in OHIO, you dare not walk in a registrar for the Bureau of Motor Vehicles, License Division, and mention ANYTHING that suggests "abandoned," or "salvage" or "junk yard," etc, etc. They get real excited and insist that said vehicle must be parted out and DESTROYED! I've even seen one local office call all the nearby offices, warning other registrars of a specific individual who is trying to get a title for a "junk" vehicle. 

 

Ohio is SO determined to stop chop shops from bringing in cars which have been totaled from other states, rebuilding them and selling them as normal used cars, that they freak out any time they hear words that suggest cars without titles. I have testified in front of the Ohio State Senate Transportation Committee on this subject, and I can tell you it's pretty tough here on that. 

 

Years ago I interviewed an executive with the Ohio Bureau of Motor Vehicles in our state capitol, for a magazine article on old Camaros and titles. To test the extremity of their position on untitled cars, I posed the question: "Suppose I found a priceless classic car in a barn within a junk yard somewhere, and wanted to save it. IF the owner's family members who sold me the car were willing to testify it was legally owned, and had been sealed up in that old barn for decades but the title was lost in a fire, how would I go about getting a legal title in Ohio?" Her answer was, "You cannot do it, even if the car is worth a million dollars." Any car that has ever been junked to any degree must be destroyed. You could sell the parts, though." Sheesh! Yet, I knew in my mind that if you found a Duesenberg or original Hemi Cuda convertible, etc, etc, you could obtain a title by selling the car out of state. It's a simple loophole, but it's downright ridiculous to put a legitimate buyer through such a hassle. Oh, well. Who ever said the government could be efficient? 

 

 

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I once inquired with a local attorney on the cost to get a title for a vehicle here in PA. He said costs normally start at $800 for their service and go up. Is that too high? Maybe... but if it means they'll have my back if down the road something comes up, and after I've put thousands of dollars into the vehicle... it's cheap insurance. There are certainly ways to get a vehicle title by switching between states with various laws on titling, but if someone turns up down the road with the original title, do they not have claim to the vehicle? Maybe the original owner isn't that sort, but what about when their kids go through the estate and out of curiosity run a pull for the vehicle. I have two cars stored about 3 hours away from me so I don't check on them often enough. They've not been registered for some time. If someone stole them and sold em to someone else who then got titles made for them What happens? Shouldn't I be able to lay claim with my original titles? I'm no attorney, and I would certainly buy a project without a title, but theses are things that concern me and I'd rather pay the money to get it done as right as possible.

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5 hours ago, mercer09 said:

been driving my classics for years with VT tags.

 

nobody cares unless you have a neighbor out to get you..............

 

nothing greater then to fear fear itself.

 

 

I'll ask again:  "What's wrong with driving your classics displaying Vermont tags?"

 

Cheers,

Grog

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well nothing except, I live in NJ. You are supposed to transfer your registration to the state you live in within 30 days in most cases.............

 

the fearful on the forum would have me horsewhipped if they knew my identity. Why I asked you to pls not tell anyone................!

 

:)

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They show in the photo state of Florida Titles, when I transfered my cars to Florida from NY they needed to do a physical VIN verification of the vehicle, I don't know how they legally do offer this service. Service's like this have been around for decades, I remember a lot of the titles were either from Alabama or Maine

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4 hours ago, Frantz said:

I once inquired with a local attorney on the cost to get a title for a vehicle here in PA. He said costs normally start at $800 for their service and go up. Is that too high? Maybe... but if it means they'll have my back if down the road something comes up, and after I've put thousands of dollars into the vehicle... it's cheap insurance. There are certainly ways to get a vehicle title by switching between states with various laws on titling, but if someone turns up down the road with the original title, do they not have claim to the vehicle? Maybe the original owner isn't that sort, but what about when their kids go through the estate and out of curiosity run a pull for the vehicle. I have two cars stored about 3 hours away from me so I don't check on them often enough. They've not been registered for some time. If someone stole them and sold em to someone else who then got titles made for them What happens? Shouldn't I be able to lay claim with my original titles? I'm no attorney, and I would certainly buy a project without a title, but theses are things that concern me and I'd rather pay the money to get it done as right as possible.

Frantz, I totally agree with everything you've said here. I am NOT advocating for people to use the method I described above. However, here in Ohio we have some misguided laws intended to thwart car thieves, which end up instead making life very hard on legitimate, prudent citizens who merely want to buy a car and pay all the various Ohio taxes and fees to make it legal to own and drive. (Bad registration laws are kind of like cheap padlocks...they don't even slow down real thieves, but they can be awfully inconvenient for owner of the property)! The problem is that, around here there is no reasonable and legal path within the Ohio Dept of Motor Vehicles which a legitimate owner of a car without a title can follow to a satisfactory conclusion. 

 

Years ago I really dug into this issue here in Ohio. At the time I was publishing CAMARO CORRAL magazine bi-monthly, in full color. I sent my contributing editor to our Columbus govt offices, for an interview with the senior mgr of the Title Bureau (or whatever it is officially called). I simply doubted the story I had always been given by local officials, which said that all titles for all cars in Ohio which have not had license plates purchased in 5 years, are completely and permanently destroyed by the state. So, if you are restoring your original Pierce Arrow  (for example), and it takes you more than 5 years (so you haven't bought license plates during this down time), the state of Ohio will destroy their only copy of your title. They told me that, if you haven't licensed your car in Ohio in 5 years and then you lose your copy of your title, you are totally out of luck. 

 

I thought this situation over carefully, and then wrote out a "test scenario," and instructed the editor to hand it to the senior director during the interview. I had developed a scenario in which some evil people had stolen a muscle car out of storage somewhere, and then used it in a highly-public attempt to assassinate some important world leader who was visiting Ohio at the time. The car gets recovered by the FBI and CIA, and now they come marching into the state dept of Motor Vehicles with all kinds of court orders, and demand that officials there look that car up by its VIN, and reveal who had owned it. But keep in mind, this hot rod getaway car had not had Ohio license plates bought for it in 5 years, and the owner didn't even realize it was missing yet. So, what answer would this director give to the cops under these circumstances? She replied, "I would have to tell them I am sorry, as I have absolutely no way of finding that information." Then she beckoned the editor to follow her inside the building further, to an area where he could see for himself. There he witnessed a guy pulling stacks and stacks and stacks of Ohio titles and feeding them to a massive shredder. Then she said to him, "And that's THAT. Once these originals are gone, there are no other copies!" 

 

So even though I don't advocate people to get titles through the out-of-state transaction plan as outlined before, there are indeed times when it becomes necessary for some legitimate car owners. And I ALWAYS warn people that if a car shows up on a police theft report, or if someone shows up with an original copy of a legitimate title to the car, you will probably forfeit ownership. 

 

What NEEDS to happen is for a reasonable, legal, and legitimate path through each state bureaucracy to be created for prudent citizens to follow when seeking a title for property which they can prove they purchased legally. 

 


 

Edited by lump (see edit history)

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Keep in mind that this interview was done maybe 20 years ago, before the use of computers was so ubiquitous. So maybe they keep title records longer now, since it doesn't take up so much storage space? Who knows? But even today it is might tough to come up with a title for un-titled vehicles. Unfortunately, this lack of an available legitimate solution results in too many people tampering with VIN's on old vehicles. That is HIGHLY illegal, and extremely unwise.  

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14 hours ago, Frantz said:

I once inquired with a local attorney on the cost to get a title for a vehicle here in PA. He said costs normally start at $800 for their service and go up. Is that too high? Maybe... but if it means they'll have my back if down the road something comes up, and after I've put thousands of dollars into the vehicle... it's cheap insurance. There are certainly ways to get a vehicle title by switching between states with various laws on titling, but if someone turns up down the road with the original title, do they not have claim to the vehicle? Maybe the original owner isn't that sort, but what about when their kids go through the estate and out of curiosity run a pull for the vehicle. I have two cars stored about 3 hours away from me so I don't check on them often enough. They've not been registered for some time. If someone stole them and sold em to someone else who then got titles made for them What happens? Shouldn't I be able to lay claim with my original titles? I'm no attorney, and I would certainly buy a project without a title, but theses are things that concern me and I'd rather pay the money to get it done as right as possible.

 

My Brother went thru that process here in PA several years ago,  likely with the same attorney. Indeed it cost about $800 and took more than a full year and was a lot of work (testimonials from the previous owner etc). This car was 1949 Triumph Serial number 1. It is now in Australia.

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I looked at their website. Seems to me like it's a much needed service in the vintage car world.

I've cleaned up a few lost titles through lien sales over the years but I wouldn't hesitate to give these guys a call the next time around and see what they can offer.

I say "thanks for offering to help!"

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On 9/17/2018 at 8:35 PM, keninman said:

You can always just title it in Indiana, if the Hoosier state won't title it nobody will.

 

Wisconsin will too........although the process is quite lengthy.

It's fine if you live here and buy a vehicle with the intent of keeping it.

 

https://wisconsindot.gov/Pages/dmv/vehicles/title-plates/surety-bond.aspx

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On 9/19/2018 at 1:13 AM, cahartley said:

 

Wisconsin will too........although the process is quite lengthy.

It's fine if you live here and buy a vehicle with the intent of keeping it.

 

https://wisconsindot.gov/Pages/dmv/vehicles/title-plates/surety-bond.aspx

Our process here on low value vehicles is pretty loose. I couldn't say about modern vehicles but vintage ones without high resale values I don't think they want to put that much effort and money into. My Siata appears to be a 1969 though the title says 1970 and they titled it as a Fiat. It had to be in the Indiana system because it had originally came from here 10 to 15 years ago. Was finally titled in Ohio then I bought it and re-titled it in Indiana. My Stude Dictator originated in Illinois, then was titled in Michigan and I moved it to Indiana. The title is using the body tag not the serial number on the frame. 

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On 9/18/2018 at 4:55 PM, mercer09 said:

John,

it is a title lien. No vin verification is necessary.

 

 

 I found that to be incorrect, if the paperwork is from outside the State of Florida the vehicle must have a VIN verification. I have been going through this for the past several years and the cars are already registered to me but in NYS 

Edited by John348 (see edit history)
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