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This photo was posted on a New Zealand facebook page today with a few other historical photos from the Havelock area of the South Island but I have my doubts it was taken in NZ. Maybe more likely the US?

 

 

41866312_2109402372721707_3552662175472418816_n.jpg

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Truck is a Garford (the name is partially visible below the radiator). Mid/late teens vintage.

That could easily be a scene in British Columbia.  The area I live in was logged off about the time that truck would have been new.

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1 hour ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

You have to wonder how good the brakes would be on that rig. A lot of weight rolling down hill.

 

How do you know it's going downhill? The fact that the photo is taken at an angle does not mean that the roadbed is angled.  It looks more like a bridge over a gorge.

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1 hour ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

You have to wonder how good the brakes would be on that rig. A lot of weight rolling down hill.

 

With no cab, doors or seat belts it would be easy to bail out of if the brakes did go out.... :D

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I doubt its going very fast. Even if it was downhill. A little engine braking would probly keep it under control.

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3 hours ago, joe_padavano said:

 

How do you know it's going downhill? The fact that the photo is taken at an angle does not mean that the roadbed is angled.  It looks more like a bridge over a gorge.

 

Well, sooner or later that rig will be going downhill (literally and/or figuratively) somewhere, sometime, somehow.  Where ever that photo was taken, there are probably some hills around ... unless it's Florida.  Oh, wait, there're hills here too.

 

Cruising around the ol' "Net", I found the same photo on a Model T Ford forum:

https://www.google.com/search?q=garford+truck&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=BYBZdhzA--m63M%3A%2Crt0zyuKSDKdyIM%2C_&usg=AFrqEzcDQD2qArFFZVPPc8yyWmKC3xy-bQ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjO0rfaysLdAhWR7lMKHW01BnsQ9QEwBXoECAUQDA#imgrc=BYBZdhzA--m63M:&spf=1537206282225

 

The photo was described:

"I was searching for some more old T truck pictures and ran across this one that I thought was really slick. Very clear picture of a T touring at the pump with a Garford tanker sitting to the side. I thought some of my old truck buddies here might appreciate the Garford tidbits and a couple other pictures I found. The old logger was taken in Washington state and that is a cedar log on the back. One ugly little truck but I think I could make room for such an interesting rig."

 

That's one story, but there may be more.

 

Cheers,

Grog

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4 hours ago, Bhigdog said:

Two different size front wheels? Yes? No?.......................Bob.

 

Optical illusion?

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1 hour ago, capngrog said:

 

Well, sooner or later that rig will be going downhill (literally and/or figuratively) somewhere, sometime, somehow.  Where ever that photo was taken, there are probably some hills around ... unless it's Florida.  Oh, wait, there're hills here too.

 

Cruising around the ol' "Net", I found the same photo on a Model T Ford forum:

https://www.google.com/search?q=garford+truck&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=BYBZdhzA--m63M%3A%2Crt0zyuKSDKdyIM%2C_&usg=AFrqEzcDQD2qArFFZVPPc8yyWmKC3xy-bQ&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjO0rfaysLdAhWR7lMKHW01BnsQ9QEwBXoECAUQDA#imgrc=BYBZdhzA--m63M:&spf=1537206282225

 

The photo was described:

"I was searching for some more old T truck pictures and ran across this one that I thought was really slick. Very clear picture of a T touring at the pump with a Garford tanker sitting to the side. I thought some of my old truck buddies here might appreciate the Garford tidbits and a couple other pictures I found. The old logger was taken in Washington state and that is a cedar log on the back. One ugly little truck but I think I could make room for such an interesting rig."

 

That's one story, but there may be more.

 

Cheers,

Grog

 

I did a quick look round the net myself and found it was on a pinterest page - which I am not hooked up to so didn't find the source.

 

A cedar tree in BC sounds more logical to me.

 

Here in NZ I have not seen reference to those log roads. Most of the early logging was done with bullocks and then with small steam railways.

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This from Pinterest.com. Looks like the same place with a fleet of these trucks. The first one even has a rain shelter on it. North America I think...

image.png.2ddb6b59434f43e2bc1f5f7f0cf5602f.png

Title is Logging in Washington State and there are eight images under that title.

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13 minutes ago, Spinneyhill said:

This from Pinterest.com. Looks like the same place with a fleet of these trucks. The first one even has a rain shelter on it. North America I think...

image.png.2ddb6b59434f43e2bc1f5f7f0cf5602f.png

Title is Logging in Washington State and there are eight images under that title.

 

And the bottom of this photo has "Seattle" written on it along with the photographer ("Darius Kinsey" if I make it out correctly).

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The pic in post # 16 , shows a different truck from the first pic; and the left front wheel in pic# 16 appears to be smaller too.  Appears to be, is the key here.  I just believe it is an optical illusion.

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These pictures appear in several of the Pacific Northwest logging books that I have.  More than a few logging companies built the railway style roads to help prevent rollovers. 

 Any work in the woods is dangerous, these trucks are probably as safe as the bigger faster ones used today.  That Garford is probably worm drive which acts more like a brake than bevel or hypoid gears when coasting.  It is probably something like 10 or 12 to one ratio and the maximum speed on those solid rubber tires is likely less than 15 mph.

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That bridge looks pretty stout to me.   

How do we know them are men in those photos .  Could be some of them tought turn of the Century (last Century) Women, like they talk about on Prairie Home Companion.  Maybe the men are back at camp cooking for them. ;) 

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1 hour ago, Tinindian said:

These pictures appear in several of the Pacific Northwest logging books that I have.  More than a few logging companies built the railway style roads to help prevent rollovers. 

 Any work in the woods is dangerous, these trucks are probably as safe as the bigger faster ones used today.  That Garford is probably worm drive which acts more like a brake than bevel or hypoid gears when coasting.  It is probably something like 10 or 12 to one ratio and the maximum speed on those solid rubber tires is likely less than 15 mph.

 

Were it in California, even today, they could be fined for speeding if they exceeded 15 MPH or, more likely looking at the load, 12 MPH. See: http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/codes_displaySection.xhtml?lawCode=VEH&sectionNum=22409.

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This picture was taken about twenty years ago. We did work on his log cabin in Smiley Creek Idaho. His hobby was logging, and this was his toy he had built. If I remember correctly, it was a 1953 Baby Mac? It was all done with modern running gear, Cummins engine, custom step side bed. It was done very nice, he said it was a fun truck to take up in the mountains. 

53 mac 003.JPG

Edited by Xander Wildeisen (see edit history)
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6 minutes ago, ply33 said:

 

Were it in California, even today, they could be fined for speeding if they exceeded 15 MPH or, more likely looking at the load, 12 MPH. See: http://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/codes_displaySection.xhtml?lawCode=VEH&sectionNum=22409.

I'm surprise anyone wants to live in CA.  If it wasn't for the climate and Ocean I don't think any normal person would.  If it's good clean fun or involves cars it either causes cancer , can cause cancer, or is just plain illegal.   Seems to be a twisted sense of perception especially in the Urban areas. 

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