40-Torpedo

Door Hinge Repair Wood Frame 27'

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Hello all -Here is my 1927 Buick that has been in a barn since 1940 when the distributor broke. It was then purchased from the original owner by my friend in 1970 and moved to his shop where it has sat since then. The wood frame of the body is amazingly solid and I cant really see a reason to replace any of the wood. However when my friend bought it he decided to "fix' the holes on the screws for the door hinges. He drilled them out and placed plugs in them. This could certainly work with re-drilling, but I was wondering if anyone has used these brass threaded inserts? The great part is the 1/4 bolt has the exact taper for the door hinge, however I fear that the wood is not very pliable and I don't want to split it when screwing in the insert. Any help or suggestions would be appreciated1397448464_27buickHinge.thumb.jpg.d6a76a71516798712c8994c4cd1d9798.jpg 1500432291_27BuickRepair.thumb.jpg.afaa75733be923728d67bcf256fa2eec.jpg90650679_27BuickArrives.thumb.jpg.c9b8ac3f5f947eea7db6142c932a5301.jpg

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If it is possible to get to the back side, I think I would make a nut-plate and use bolts (3) all the way through. Perhaps fasten the plate on the inside with a tiny screw, so it cant fall down if the bolts are removed.

 

For what its worth, on some Fisher bodies just a little bit newer, one of the three is a bolt going all the way through to a t-nut.

 

Nut inserts like the ones in your picture can work well in solid hardwood (they are sometimes used in maple on guitar necks for instance), but I would expect old body wood to be brittle. I wouldn't want to strain it any more than necessary.

Edited by Bloo (see edit history)

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Welcome to the form glad to see another project getting started. I would agree with Bloo making a plate that would be the size of the three holes square so that the pressure would be distributed across the wood should be safer to prevent cracking or splitting. You could also use large area washers one for each screw nut combo. If you need to grinde the area washers on the side so they all fit nicely in the triangle pattern. If you go the nut combo my opinion would to use a fiber lock nut so it does not potentially loosen as the door is used. Just my two cents.

Edited by RatFink255 (see edit history)

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Perfectly understandable solutions!  Thanks so much! I like the nut plate idea. The only portion that will not work is on the upper hinges of the front, though there are three hinges to work with on those doors. Two should suffice for the extra strength and use wood screws on the upoer. 

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If the wood plugs are good, I would  just use a new wood screw.  Punch the centerhole so you keep things aligned.  If the screw holds tight you are done. If it pulls out you can always epoxy another plug in.  Or go up one size on the screw diameter or length.  

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Torpedo, I have used the inserts for this very application on a ‘36 Buick.  It was new wood.  They work very well if the wood is good.  I hope you have the T handle made to insert them as it is needed for good alignment.  Also, make sure you drill the hole large enough as these inserts can’t enlarge a hole.

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The "T" nuts work fine and stay in place, but you may want to counterbore for the threaded part and that might be difficult in tight places.

The steel plates take a little more work to make and a little glue or RTV on the back will hold them if you take out all the screws.

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