JFranklin

Does anybody have a time machine?

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My first trip to a junk yard was in 1950 or 1951. I was with Dad. It was Ott Conley’s, in Lincoln, Illinois. It looked just like that picture. I have often wondered what treasures I walked by, as I knew nothing about cars at that young age. Why can I remember that day of so long ago, but have no idea what I ate for breakfast? 

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They state the photo is from around 1941, many of these cars may have been the last ones guys owned before going off to fight WWIII, I always hope the made it home. Bob 

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As Bill points out, most of these cars look to be in fairly nice shape. The other issue is that with WW11 on its way, most people held on their cars. They might have had inside information from the Government that war was coming and traded in these cars knowing that they would not be able to get a new one soon.

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Did any one notice that Model A's weren't well represented here?   With WWII coming on, a larger proportion were kept rather than junked because of, among other reasons, their utility, simplicity, and ease of getting parts.  Except for tires that is, hence so many were refitted with 16" '35 Ford wheels, tires for which, though rationed continued in production.   During the war the A's popularity really began showing.   Previously with a worth in the 35 to 50 dollar range, the price escalated.  The Office of Price Administration, established to curb inflation because there was too much money chasing too few goods, set a ceiling price at $225.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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450 cars

Edited by Dave Henderson (see edit history)

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My Grandfather's 1933 Graham was the newest car in town during the pre WW2 days (population 2500 in WI).  When someone needed to go to the hospital or make a long trip they would barrow his Graham.  Everyone else in town drove Model Ts or horses, rural town during the depression.  I have a pile of great first hand stories between 1935 and 1954 when he sold the Graham.  He never used anti freeze,  just a alcohol mix when it started to get cold (my Mom remembers the bottle in the back seat), almost everyone parked their cars in the winter when it got cold.  The Graham had 30,000 miles on it when he sold it, it was 21 years old, he said "it was old enough to vote" when he sold it.  My Grandma would complain he loved the Graham more than her....

 

The Graham looks just like the one in the lower left hand corner, wish I had that one just for parts.

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"I see said the blind man," all I had to do was look at the whole picture to see the coupes, duh! Another thing how the hell did they get anything into the yard. Every time I try to follow a possible aisle it seems to be blocked by another car. Obviously the Studebaker sign has very little relationship to the cars that are staged in it's vicinity. 

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So I told my computer to set this pic as my background.

It looks pretty good however is a bit to big and I didn't get it all.

Me being computer and photo stupid it will have to do.

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Just think 10-20 years in the future that yard in the  photo would be filled with 1932-1940 Ford Coupes. They would come out for a career in Stock Car Racing, then return a crumbled wreck. 

 

 

Bob 

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15 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

Just think 10-20 years in the future that yard in the  photo would be filled with 1932-1940 Ford Coupes. They would come out for a career in Stock Car Racing, then return a crumbled wreck. 

 

 

Bob 

Stop it !!!  You’re making me cry !!!

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A friend of mine and his brother ran a Plymouth and Desoto dealership during the 1930's not far from my house. At the time most manufacturers saw the used car as a threat to new car sales. There was a factory allowance to the dealership for trades plus junk price. The "factory man" made his route to disable trade in's. He carried a sledge hammer in his car. He would use it to damage the radiator and crack the block on the trades. The cost of repair pretty much made them junk and, in the corporate mind, maintained new car sales.

My friend said that when a particularly nice used car came in there were times when a few dollars would lighten the blow, not often, but on special occasions.

 

Alfred P. Sloan did a lot to change that policy at GM. He promoted a better relationship with dealers and encouraged the marketing of used cars to ad dealer profit. Harley Earl did things to improve GM used car value along with Sloan. Change comes slow and even when I was a kid a ten year old car was an exception. Geologically I am in a bad survival location, anyway. Back in the last century we felt fortunate to have NAPA stores with national distribution and parts could be sourced from areas with greater longevity.

 

Those junkyards had more cars than you think; for many reasons.

Bernie

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