Sign in to follow this  
tblack

1917 buick d45

Recommended Posts

It has been awhile but a 1917 buick d45 has found its away to my garage as a winter project. The collection of tags in the back indicate it was well traveled on the Glidden tour between 1953 and at least 1966, it belonged to an important US business person from new to about 1968.The second owner used it for 6 years or so then parked among his stable of cars for the last 45 years.  I am now the third owner.  I checked out the ring gear before I bought it and it is perfect!!! Engine is stuck from sitting 45 years but I should get that freed up soon. I never hang on these things for too long so if there is interest out there, drop me a PM....Noted the cool poor man's dual cowl phaeton rear window attachment!  Ive only seen one other on a 1930 Lincoln

buick6.JPG

buick 9.JPG

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

actually pretty good...missing a fan belt, lunchbox coil and the valves are non original necessitating the lifter arm blocks to be shimmed higher. The carb and manifold look to be off later model using the manifold carb preheat mechanism controlled from the dash. Must have been considered an improvement on the glidden tours of the 50's..other than that everything else is there including the original rear carpets.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Me too for a welcome back Tom! No matter what you do you can not escape the spell of the cage valve Buick! Is you old 1923-49 still down the street?

 Larry D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The 1923 49 was taken to Florida  by  my neighbor to his  winter  home and the day after it arrived he sold it for the full asking price.  It was an enjoyable car.  Per the 17 Buick I had first thought the manifold and carb were changed out but viewing other 17 buicks on the net they did have the  carb heat pre controlled from the dash like my old 1923 did.  I clearly see the carb has d44 and d45 casting numbers.   The flame thrower from the exhaust to the carb is plugged.   The valves are a more modern adaptation as they use wedge keepers. I think I read somewhere in Dean Tryon's newsletter that someone had used valves out of a 283 engine and this could be a similar retrofit.  I will let the pb blaster work for a few days before trying to free it up.  I'll post more pictures latter

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My wife was happy to see the Buick come as long as I got rid of the( 2) 1949 Studebaker model 2R16A trucks...these were each 2 ton trucks one a tilting grain body the other a rack body.  I got one running before she blew her stack. After selling those and doing an extensive honey do list she said ok to the buick as a project.   Probably will get it running and on to something else.  I did get it freed up this afternoon so maybe over the weekend I'll get it started for the first time in 45 years

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Any hints on how to find the history of a car, starting from scratch gents? :)  It can make a difference on the value of a car, could it not?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 hours ago, tblack said:

My wife was happy to see the Buick come as long as I got rid of the( 2) 1949 Studebaker model 2R16A trucks...these were each 2 ton trucks one a tilting grain body the other a rack body.

I'd say you married well.  Glad to see you are planning to get this old Buick back on the road. 

You seem to be in good Buick company too.

Congratulations...

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm the guy who lives 15 miles from you, in Barkersville. Trying to fix up a barn find E-49, coming along nicely. My valve cages are at the NAPA shop in Saratoga, nobody runs a better shop than Gary, according to.....like.....everybody.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Morgan like to get together to see your E49.

 

Although freed up I need to go through the fuel system before starting...The vacuum tank looked like it was used  as a coffee pot and the grounds were left in it for 50 years!  I cleaned it up and looks functional...the gas tank looks equally as murky, I drained it out (5 gallons of 50 year old fuel), dropped the tank and sent it over to shop to be rehabbed. I'll get it back in a couple of weeks. In the waiting period I'll clean up the carb and evaluate a fix for a cracked bow up top.  Not planning a full restoration only making it functional and reliable, the patina is fine.

  • Like 5

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Morgan...nice to have met you in person the other day in Barkersville...your E-49's will keep you busy and you do have lots of extra parts.

 

As I need a belt for my D-45, it was interesting to see you used a NAPA Gates belt 060295 6PK750.I found one on line and hopefully it will fit mine. As I look at installing the belt in advance if seems that the  the ringed fan is too large to slip the belt over..seems as though the easiest way is to remove the radiator, fan and then install the belt. Can anyone weigh in on this with any tricks, 2 piece belts etc.

 

I'm waiting on the fuel tank and the belt before firing the car over. I cleaned up the carb no surprises but at some point it would be good to replace the float. Anyone making floats out there?

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 hours ago, tblack said:

 As I look at installing the belt in advance if seems that the  the ringed fan is too large to slip the belt over..seems as though the easiest way is to remove the radiator, fan and then install the belt. Can anyone weigh in on this with any tricks, 2 piece belts etc.
 

 

My radiator was out at the time, so I don't know how I'd go about doing the job with the radiator in. The bolt that holds the fan on is reverse thread and if you can remove it and if there's enough room between the fan and the radiator, to move the fan forward enough to slip the belt in, it might work. It's a pain getting the radiator out, I had to remove the headlights and the hood, seems like a lot of work to replace a fan belt.

.

.

Edited by Morgan Wright (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went the long route radiator, lights, hood and fan...but a good chance to clean up the front of the engine....good news I drained 2-1/2 gallons of new full strength anti freeze so the radiator  nor anything else is  leaking. If the system were dry I would be worried about the radiator forming scale.

 

Larry thanks for the tip on the float I'll follow up on that. 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Talking fan belts.

 

Years ago, my 1923 came with a brand new leather belt.   Looked great.  Fun to watch that metal staple seam go round and round. 

 

First all day tour in the rain and the belt stretched and slipped and got 'thrown' and bent my fan.  Next stop was the NAPA store and a wide, flat, modern, 'rubber' serpentine belt.  Not very long, and the part number has worn off long ago, but I pointed to the one I wanted hanging on the wall and we matched it to the leather one by eye and it has been running without incident for 20+ years.

 

Made me wonder how they made the old leather belts work back in the day.  Maybe today's cows are not as waterproof?  :P

  • Haha 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The cows were OK back then. Leather belts drove all kinds of things.

In your case, that "new" belt probably was NOS. The "O " being old. "O on anything like that = junk.

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I still have the leather belt my car came with. It was 80 years old and broken, and sitting on the fan pulley. It probably was good 80 years ago, but after 80 years of sitting there it dried out and tightened and broke just from sitting there. I took it to NAPA and they sized it up, and gave me the rubber one Tom saw.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The belt arrived and I was excited to get the car back together...   but ....  when the belt was cinched tight the fan ring  was directly under the upper hose for the radiator and barely touched it.  As the radiator was recored in the past it is possible that it lost a little clearance...so I found a slightly shorter belt that should work...if it works I'll post the Dayco numbers.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this