Gary Best

1940 Resto Rod Buick Special Tourning Sedan

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Gary!! Welcome, it's to hear from you.  Can you post more pics of the body?  The frame looks great.

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Greetings from Oldham County. Great job so far. What's going under the hood? Tranny? What color are you thinking about for it? Keep the pics coming.... 

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One year the Great American Race ended in LA and 6 us us jumped in a stock 40 Buick 4 door and took off down the Freeway for a fine steak dinner.  I was impressed that it was no problem in LA traffic and stayed up with the over the speed limit traffic.  The car was driven by Zane Shubert who had just completed 4200 miles in a stock 1935 Buick Coupe.

Made me think I should have kept the straight 8 in my 35 Buick instead of the Buick V8 I used.

Buick@Parkers.thumb.jpg.5fb733cff09fa375474b7133f018e654.jpg

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20 hours ago, Lebowski said:

Greetings from Oldham County. Great job so far. What's going under the hood? Tranny? What color are you thinking about for it? Keep the pics coming.... 

700R and a 385HP Chevy Fast Burn SB

New 700R Trans.jpg

Edited by Gary Best (see edit history)
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2 hours ago, Restorer32 said:

Interesting but is this the proper forum for a resto rod?

 I am not against restro rods,(I have a few of my own)

 I think that the finished project would look nice in this forum but the build could be better viewed and appreciated in the HAMB forum.

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This has been the conundrum facing every car club, how does one expand or maintain interest in specialty cars or in this forum's case, the vintage vehicle. I call a truce.

 

I think the Buick Club of America (BCA) has done well to recognize modified cars. In fact there is a part of their forum that showcases these discussions: http://forums.aaca.org/forum/13-buick-modified/.  His postings might be better suited there, but I'm glad he has stepped forward to show us his car.  Their national meets include modified cars as a category and dedicated parking.

 

I also have a 1940 model Buick and his work on his car has led my efforts with considerable benefit, as I firmly believe his efforts have helped others in the vintage vehicle market/hobby.   There is much commonality in the work of restoring or modifying these old cars.  The manufacturer that reproduces parts such as plastic knobs, brake parts, engine parts and sheet metal for the modified car suites the needs of the authentic restorer.  The chrome shop that takes a good percentage of business from discerning creators of modified cars is the same chrome shop that I want to do business with and that wouldn't possible exist if he just had my business.  The advice on sources and techniques, plus the encouragement to complete the long arduous tasks required for our vehicles is important for sustaining our hobby if not growing it.  Further, guys like this have donated or made available parts removed from their cars that they will not be using for use on the authentic restorations.  On another note he is similar to a guy I know up north in one of those "M" states that buys cars that are in good restorable condition and parts them out, tossing the body at the end of the process.  Many of us have desperately called this guy for parts.  If it weren't for this "M" state guy, many of these older cars would languish in deterioration in a barn where no one could know of their existence and others of us would be without valuable and needed parts.

 

I hope that when Gary drives his car down the road one day, some young kid sees it and wishes one for himself or some older guy/gal looks at it and fondly remembers when there were more of them on the road.  Good luck Gary, please keep posting.

 

  

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I like this thread, and as Kgreen pointed out in his post above, the techniques/skills involved in modification are often the same as those used in restoration.  I'm sure that I'll learn something from this thread, and to quote the Faber College motto: "Knowledge Is Good".

 

Cheers,

Grog

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1 hour ago, kgreen said:

guys like this have donated or made available parts removed from their cars that they will not be using for use on the authentic restorations.

Also, remember that in addition to original parts availability, these guys often show us how to make hidden modifications to our original cars for better safety.

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We will have to disagree. I have no problem with what he is doing but I still feel it does not belong on an an AACA forum. There are plenty of forums for modified cars.  If it wouldn't be allowed at an AACA National Meet it shouldn't be on these forums,  in my humble opinion.

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7 hours ago, Restorer32 said:

We will have to disagree. I have no problem with what he is doing but I still feel it does not belong on an an AACA forum. There are plenty of forums for modified cars.  If it wouldn't be allowed at an AACA National Meet it shouldn't be on these forums,  in my humble opinion.

I agree, why post here where people who like STOCK cars navigate.

Also, Oh please, please modifiers if you are trying to make your Buick ( in this case ) a modified car please use a BUICK engine. There is nothing worse than making a Pontiac, Oldsmobile, Buick or Cadillac into a Chevrolet!

Remember like we were taught by G.M. and our folks, the ENGINE is the brand!  

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If you want a small block Chevy in a car, buy a Chevy. Plenty of hot forums out there in my opinion. It makes me sick every time I see a nice car ruined. 

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Tom,   RUINED is a pretty strong word.  Other than stock maybe but not ruined.  Would the same ruined term apply to a antique car painted with modern base coat clear coat paint or seat belts?


I think this 1940 Buick will show well and should be welcome on any show field in a class like HPOF called "Modified Antique".  With the hood closed it will still look like a 1940 Buick to 99.9%.  Remember HPOF and Un-restored Barn Finds are among the most popular vehicles classes

on the show field.  We can't all agree on vanilla, that's why Baskins Robbins has 31 flavors, but it"s all ice cream!

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Edited by Paul Dobbin
tried to get rid of screen shit in the image section (see edit history)
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16 hours ago, Pfeil said:

I agree, why post here where people who like STOCK cars navigate.

Also, Oh please, please modifiers if you are trying to make your Buick ( in this case ) a modified car please use a BUICK engine. There is nothing worse than making a Pontiac, Oldsmobile, Buick or Cadillac into a Chevrolet!

Remember like we were taught by G.M. and our folks, the ENGINE is the brand!  

After the Straight 8 all Buick V8 sucked. Over weight under powered. Why GM uses Chevy in all their cars today.

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5 minutes ago, Gary Best said:

After the Straight 8 all Buick V8 sucked. Over weight under powered. Why GM uses Chevy in all their cars today.

 

Hoo hoo I dont think you realize the size of the can of woopass you just opened on yourself there son. Specially around here.

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