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GARY F

General question

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What difference would it make if I used one guage heavier wire that was on between the coil and distributer. In my case a 37 Olds 8cyl.  Thanks

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It should not hurt. 6 volt wire is usually heavier than 12 volt and when you switch from 6 to 12 a lot use the same wire. I’m sure some one with a lot more knowledge on this will jump in soon and give you the information. 

Dave S 

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The wire would offer slightly less resistance to the current flow, in amps, through the wire.  It would be hard to measure the change in resistance given the wire is relatively short.  What you do want to check is the flexibility of the new wire versus the original wire.  It should be as flexible as the original which is a function of the number of individual strands of wire that make up the completed wire.  Too few strands make the wire prone to vibration stresses and breakage.

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2 hours ago, Friartuck said:

Use minimum of 14 AWG wire for a coil application, 12 AWG if you can, it won't hurt.

Seems a bit heavy for the wire from the coil to the distributor.  Typical draw is 4 to 6 amps for the coil circuit.  From the DC battery source on 6v to the coil I agree with 14 AWG to keep the copper losses to a minimum.

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14  AWG is normal size for the coil to distributor . 12  AWG is a bit of overkill. Generator output wire should be 12 AWG. 

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On 8/31/2018 at 8:43 PM, TerryB said:

Seems a bit heavy for the wire from the coil to the distributor. 

 

Same current flows through both coil to distributor as coil to ignition. Just a few feet difference. So if 14 is minimum on one wire it is the same for other wire. 

 

If the coil to distributor wire connects to the points and the points plate rotates with advance mechanisms the wire must be very flexible. Not ordinary chassis use flexible wire. 

 

And the the current of 4 amps or so is an average current. You should size the wire for maximum current with points closed. 

Edited by Frank DuVal (see edit history)

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Frank, from my tune up guide 4 to 6 amps is the range given with the points closed and engine not running.  I am an electronics guy, 35 years at what was known to most as RCA.  In non automotive applications 14 to 12 AWG would be overkill for that level of current.  I appreciate the knowledge that automobiles use that heavy of wire, I could not recall what the coil to points wire looked like as it’s been quite a while since I was around one.  

Terry

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Hmm, internet search favors your 4 to 6 as closed points current, so disregard my average current statement......😡  I need an emoji getting a dolt slap.

 

6 volt coils seem to be 1 to 1.8 ohms, so that is in 4-6 amp range.

 

Yes, 14 awg is good for 15 or more amps depending on how hot you want the wire to run and the temperature rating of the insulation.

 

 

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