leomara

Dealers, Brokers, Bounty Hunters or Sam Spade???

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So here I am still looking for that elusive 1929 Chrysler Model 75 roadster and a thought came to mind.  What methods of search yield the best results?  Car Wanted ad in Hemmings,  online collector car for sale sites, Ebay, Craigslist or the enlistment of an "agent" of some sort who does the search work for a living?  I'm interested in finding out how you fellow hobbyists have successfully found a not so common automobile, what has worked and what has not.  Please advise.  

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Join a club for that particular car. I don't know about Chrysler, but many clubs exist for particular makes and models of cars. Also, join a local AACA Chapter or Region if possible. You would be surprised how often local club members know about cars for sale that might not be advertised publicly. 

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I have had great results running a wanted ad in the AACA Magazine, for both parts and a car. I also felt somewhat at ease because there is the "club" connection as far as honesty and trustworthiness 

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The best way to find the car that you are looking for. Is to put out a few ads with parts for sale. List a bunch of roadster only items for sale. This will get the owners of roadsters calling you. :lol: Just kidding, not very nice. But it would work. Any of the above ideas are a good way to look for a car. Offering a strong market price, will flush out an owner on the fence about selling. It gets very hard to find any car, when you are year/make/model specific. Premium price payed, words buyers never want to say. Would be the best way to find what you are looking for.

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A dealer, broker or agent isn't going to do anything that you can't do  yourself.

 

While what  you are looking for isn't particularly  rare or expensive. It is, however, very specific and somewhat obscure. For this reason, when you find one for sale, you need to be ready to buy it and not be picky. You aren't going to have as many choices as buying a Model A or 1957 Chevrolet. If it needs work, or is too pristine, or an ugly color, or located in Southeastern Timbuktu,  you still need to buy it and worry about these issues later. If you find one that is too expensive,  just go ahead and buy it anyway, because someone else will and it won't be you.  With such a specific request, you will have a hard time finding exactly what  you want for the price you want to pay. Be flexible on all accounts.

 

Joining a Chrysler club that focuses on prewar cars is certainly your best bet. Join a national group as well as the closest regional group. Join other car clubs that focus on prewar such as the AACA National and your closest regional group. The more you integrate yourself with owners of these models, the better chance you will have of locating one. Of course, keep searching ALL the websites, keep searching all the dealer listings and keep search all the auction listings. Advertise anywhere and everywhere.

 

Again, the key to success is money in hand and willingness to buy immediately.  

Edited by motoringicons (see edit history)
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I think a good method, as Matt Hinson and Motoring Icons

noted above, is to join a Chrysler club.  Then put a want-ad

in their magazine.

 

Also, talk to the technical advisor (if there is one)

for 1929 Chrysler models:  He will probably

know people who have the model you seek, and you

can call them to discuss the merits and demerits of those

models, and then broach the subject of buying from them.

 

If the club roster lists members' cars, you can also make

contacts on your own.  

 

The largest Chrysler club is the WPC Club (Walter P. Chrysler Club).

A smaller club, active in the northeast, is the NCPC (National

Chrysler Products Club).  You'll probably find that 1950's and 1960's

models garner the most attention, but there must be someone

there who is involved in 1929's.

 

Keep us involved in your search!  We'd be happy to hear of your new purchase.

Edited by John_S_in_Penna (see edit history)

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I know you're extremely selective, Leo, but here is the

exact model you want--a 1929 Chrysler Model 75--

in a rumble-seat coupe body style:

 

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1929-Chrysler-Chrysler-75-Series-Coupe/202346337467?hash=item2f1cc814bb:g:h2wAAOSwtG9bKmbL&vxp=mtr

"1929 Chrysler 75 series deluxe Coupe. Very rare car. Older restoration. It was in storage for several years. It turns free but

I have not tried to start it.  Please call  203-265-2530 for more details."

 

If you plan to use and enjoy your car, you may

hardly miss the cloth top.

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45 minutes ago, motoringicons said:

A dealer, broker or agent isn't going to do anything that you can't do  yourself.

 

While what  you are looking for isn't particularly  rare or expensive. It is, however, very specific and somewhat obscure. For this reason, when you find one for sale, you need to be ready to buy it and not be picky. You aren't going to have as many choices as buying a Model A or 1957 Chevrolet. If it needs work, or is too pristine, or an ugly color, or located in Southeastern Timbuktu,  you still need to buy it and worry about these issues later. If you find one that is too expensive,  just go ahead and buy it anyway, because someone else will and it won't be you.  With such a specific request, you will have a hard time finding exactly what  you want for the price you want to pay. Be flexible on all accounts.

 

Joining a Chrysler club that focuses on prewar cars is certainly your best bet. Join a national group as well as the closest regional group. Join other car clubs that focus on prewar such as the AACA National and your closest regional group. The more you integrate yourself with owners of these models, the better chance you will have of locating one. Of course, keep searching ALL the websites, keep searching all the dealer listings and keep search all the auction listings. Advertise anywhere and everywhere.

 

Again, the key to success is money in hand and willingness to buy immediately.  

 

This is great advice. When you're looking for something unusual, you can't afford to be picky and waiting for the right combination of cheap, perfect, and local will likely mean that you will never own the car. Be prepared to own a car whose color you may not love or to pay a few thousand dollars to ship it home. Worth it every time. Be ready to stretch your budget a little if the right car presents itself because a cheaper one in equal condition will not present itself anytime soon.


As I say to many of my clients: get in the game now, figure out what color uniform you want later.

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1 hour ago, leomara said:

Thank you for your interest John but I'm going to hang tough on this.  Again I do appreciate your input.

 

I understand.  I realized it was a remote possibility.

 

But here's another tack to take.  If your budget allows,

enjoy a coupe for a year or two or five while you

search for the ultimate roadster.  The coupe will

be fun and will take a little of the pressure off.

Meanwhile, you'll be keeping your eyes open for

a suitable roadster.  You could sell the coupe some time

in the future--or even have TWO 1929 Chryslers.

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At least find a '28-30 Mopar in driving condition around you and take it for a test drive to make sure you can live with it's quirks (all old cars have a few). I had a friend who for years wanted a '57 T'Bird. He was absolutely obsessed by the thought that he would one day own one. When the car of his dreams was advertised locally at a price he could now afford he called me and said that we had to go over right now- he needed a second set of eyes to make certain there were no glaring problems that his eagerness would hide.

 

I went over with him - nice car. Then came the test drive. It never happened - he literally was too big for the car... he didn't fit. All those years of lusting for something that doesn't work .......... lesson learned.

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3 hours ago, GregLaR said:

Well, if a coupe will "get you by" til you find a roadster, there's one currently available in Wallingford, CT. for $24,500.

https://newhaven.craigslist.org/cto/d/1929-chrysler-75-series/6622229259.html

 

29 chrysler.jpg

 

That's the very car that was listed on Ebay (for the same price).

Thanks for posting the Craig's List ad, Greg.

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I just went through this... Four months I searched and in the end I never found the cars I advertised/searched for.

 

I placed ads in several locations online and through word of mouth as well as a daily comprehensive search myself (ebay, craigslist, dealers). I quickly learned to be VERY specific in my ads... even then I got folks trying to sell me stuff I wasn't looking for.

 

I got a lot of sellers who wanted to play games... crotchety types that commonly used the phrase: "it's not going to be cheap!"... My ads specifically stated to send a picture and asking price, I got that info 50% of the time.

 

I offered a finders fee also, I would not do that again. Even though I was very specific about information leading to the successful PURCHASE of a car I got one guy who just wanted to be paid for information that lead nowhere... He got real nasty about it, slandered me online over it. That "one guy" just didn't understand I guess... not worth it to deal with that sort of stuff.

 

I found that some sellers were genuinely pissed off that I declined to purchase their car... why I don't know, I never strung them along pretending to be interested if I didn't like it right off the bat.

 

I also got a fair number of "fishers", people looking for your top dollar on their car but then disappearing on me. 

 

Most disappointing of all was a seller who offered his car, strung me along for 5 weeks and then decided to keep it... I'm still heart broken over that one, it was THE perfect car and to get toyed with like that really sucked.

 

To sum up the whole search was basically a lousy experience and I won't be doing it again anytime soon, lol. I ended up finding a totally different car on my own and purchased it from some very nice folks trying to find their father's old car a happy home. No scams or BS... just folks who wanted to sell the car and see it go to a good home. Those sellers are out there but I had to wade through lots of games and novelties to find some...

 

Best of luck on finding your car... Persistence is key!

Edited by Lahti35 (see edit history)
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Four months? That's nothing. I had a guy (I eventually fired him as a client) who wanted a 1941 Cadillac sedan. That's not unusual and there are literally hundreds of them available. I showed him perhaps 15 or 18 very good candidates, including my own personal cars. Too nice. Not nice enough. I want a different color. I want a different interior. I want a manual transmission. No, maybe an automatic would be better. Too far away. I want a sedan but not THAT style sedan.

 

Ugh. Almost seven years of sitting on the sidelines waiting for the perfect car to miraculously appear. I have a hunch that there is no perfect car for that guy. He just liked the idea of owning it and the tantalizing dream that someday he would. I don't think he actually wanted someday to arrive.

 

I'm not saying the OP is doing that, but my point is that instead of waiting for just the right combination of condition, specification, and price, just jump in and swim. I have learned doing this job that some of the cars I've always dreamed of owning turn out to be turkeys and some cars I never dreamed I would love become my favorites. As with the Thunderbird story above, it's hard to know until you see and drive and touch the car you want, but you should also see and drive and touch others that are similar just to see if you fall in love. Limiting yourself to just one idealized car means you lose time and perhaps end up with a car you don't love. Or no car at all. As I always say, time is the only thing we can't get more of. You can always sell a car you don't want. You can't get back the time you spend waiting for it.

 

Open yourself to opportunity and opportunity will find you.

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I talked to a guy the other day that had, if I remember correct a 29 Chrysler roadster. A dealer was buying two cars from his mother. The dealers name is Ross Valley Auto sales, It is in Boise Idaho. I do not know if the dealer did buy the cars? Might be worth a phone call. Sorry for the late tip, just popped in my head this morning.

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4 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

I've always dreamed of owning turn out to be turkeys and some cars I never dreamed I would love become my favorites.

 

The risk is really high, having a firm grasp on that concept can lead to a long marriage, though. One hundred fifty cars/ one Wife.

Bernie

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3 hours ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

I talked to a guy the other day that had, if I remember correct a 29 Chrysler roadster. A dealer was buying two cars from his mother. The dealers name is Ross Valley Auto sales, It is in Boise Idaho. I do not know if the dealer did buy the cars? Might be worth a phone call. Sorry for the late tip, just popped in my head this morning.

https://classiccars.com/listings/dealer/926/ross-s-valley-auto-sales

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The post about the dealer having a Chrysler. I was contacted by a guy about a week ago, wanting to know if I would look at a couple of cars his mother was selling. He did not think she was getting a fair price for them. Wanted to know what they were worth. I said could be 2,500-35,000 just depends on condition. It was a six cylinder car, that has been sitting for some time. If the dealer did buy them, they might not be listed for sale yet. I never heard back from him, about going to look at the cars. I do not know the seller, have heard of the dealer, do not know him. Just passing on a possible led.

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I do not know why someone would call me, and want me to look at cars their mom has for sale, and joke about it. There are better phone pranks out there. Car dealer might be wondering how someone would know about a car he might not have yet. If I get a call back from him, I will pass it on to you. Try calling back in a few days. Maybe they are trying to put a deal together, and a seller is trying to get more money, and throwing my name in mix to stir up trouble. Strange car stuff is going on out here. Hope it is true, might be the car you are looking for.

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