CharlesK

Canadian 1914 Ford Model T True Canadian Car

Recommended Posts

Up For sale, is a chance to acquire a rare Canadian 1914 Ford Model T, this is confirmed by the serial number of C 16923. While being certified and plated in Ontario, Canada has all the appropriate badges as well. Currently, the car does not have fenders installed but will come with the car already painted. Provided are the famed Canadian fenders, the famed double bead. (A picture is provided to compare the difference to the same year American car) While the car does need body work / paint as well as the interior. Work done on the car to date has been done by well regarded members of the community, with Peter Fawcett doing running gear and body work and Sandy McTavish restored the motor. The car itself is in roadworthy condition, with completely restored lights, generator, carburetor and much more! 


This Car can be shipped anywhere in the world with ease and cost effecitivily! However, located in Brockville Ontario Canada. 


For any information please contact below or by phone at 438 eight two seven 3405

Carb.jpg

IMG_4556.JPG

IMG_4561.JPG

IMG_4562.JPG

IMG_4563.JPG

IMG_4567.JPG

IMG_4568.JPG

IMG_6229.jpg

IMG_6230.jpg

IMG_6231.jpg

IMG_6232.jpg

IMG_6233.jpg

IMG_6234.jpg

IMG_6236.jpg

IMG_6237.jpg

IMG_6238.jpg

IMG_6246.JPG

IMG_6247.JPG

IMG_6248.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please send me a email or call to make a offer, currently selling for a friend and will convey the offers. refrain from low balls as we all have google to check prices! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

But, Google won't tell you the value of THAT particular car in THAT particular condition.

 

Your friend has a price in mind, everyone always does, he'd be so much better off just putting that price out there and going from that.

 

All that said, you should post it on the Model T Ford Club of America (MTFCA) site, you CAN Google that!  Be prepared to have the forum members tell you every part that's not correct (and it's rare for all the parts to be correct on an early T).

 

Good luck with sale, am sure it will find a good home....

  • Like 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎7‎/‎10‎/‎2018 at 3:58 PM, trimacar said:

  Be prepared to have the forum members tell you every part that's not correct (and it's rare for all the parts to be correct on an early T).

If the driver in the picture is the one selling the car I can assure you he knows his T and for that matter most brass cars. Name a show in North America and one of the many cars he has restored has been in it. He finished an 07 Ford K last month.

Edited by Joe in Canada (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wasn't trying to turn on a faucet of criticism, just commenting that it's extremely difficult to buy a "correct" early T....

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, trimacar said:

I wasn't trying to turn on a faucet of criticism, just commenting that it's extremely difficult to buy a "correct" early T....

I have a real problem with getting a point across and you are so right about Ts.  Just saying the fellow knows his stuff sorry for the confusion.

Was that a play on words when you used the word faucet by chance. His father was Ron Fawcett as some here will know him. Ron's last project was restoring 6 early Pierce's  at the same time. Not all were finished when he passed. He collected parts for years before he started restoring them.

Edited by Joe in Canada (see edit history)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

As far as I know apart from being different in a few details ; and comparatively small production , there is nothing particularly special about Canadian T's.  And as far as I have seen over the years they don't attract much if any price premium over U.S. produced similar year cars.  Yes the extra front door is at times handy, but not enough to boost prices. 

 I have always seen the situation to be similar with other Canadian market vehicles, McLaughlin vs U.S. Buicks, Mercury Pickups vs Ford pickups, Maple Leaf 2 tons vs Chevrolet 2 tons etc. An interesting curiosity however no real influence on market value. Does anyone outside of Canada consider them superior to their U.S. counterparts ? McLaughlin's are a bit of an exception as they definitely had an improved trim specification compared to similar year U.S. made Buicks, however even that doesn't seem to effect prices much. A McLaughlin E6-45 seems to be worth generally as much as a Buick E6-45 or at least within 10% or less . 

 

Greg in Canada

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Play on words, yes, I knew to whom you were referring.....one should never buy an expensive very early T without a T expert by one's side....true of many marques, of course, but essential in this case...

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If your serious about selling , you need to price the car. otherwise your just fishing.  I'M INTRESTED IF THE PRICE IS RIGHT. 914 474-1917  FRANK

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'd like to know more about the Canadian fender differences.  Are there any other pictures?    When did the unique fenders start - at the beginning of Canadian serial numbers in 1913?  (were they really making their own fenders then?)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Mine are just the ordinary ones. They came from a Canadian swap meet however there is no way to know if they came from a Canadian car. The odd U.S. car has made its way into Canada over the decades. 

 

Greg in Canada

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There's an original 14 Canadian touring in town with the double bead fenders as well as an original 12 Canadian touring with them. I have them on my 11 Canadian touring however mine are reproduction as I didn't have any fenders.

Ken

Surrey, BC Canada

P1010039 (Large).JPG

P1010031 (Large).JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ken, do any of the original cars you know of not have them ?  Is it a matter of some have them and some don't or did all the Canadian cars in a the late brass era have them ?

 

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure Greg. there's not a lot of truly original  early T's around.My 14 Canadian roadster doesn't have the second bead. I don't know the history of the car though. My best guess would be that Ford Canada probably used both. Maybe they came from different suppliers or perhaps production couldn't keep up with the demand and American fenders were brought in to keep the cars going out the door.

Ken

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Ken. I looked in McCalley's big black book however he does not mention them. Probably another of those things impossible to know with 100% certainty after all these years.

 

Greg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now