=diego=

A literature item I bet you've never seen before

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I scored this in Buenos Aires. Haven't read it yet (my visit was to improve my fluency, so it takes me some time....) but it looks like some kind of "thrill" show that may have been sponsored by Plymouth. 

 

Also picked up this gorgeous 1939 Dodge ad....anyone a Mopar expert? Was this art ever used in American ads? 

 

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I don't think that '39 Dodge art work would be allowed, makes the car look far more streamlined that the actual cars. Bob 

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I think you're looking at old ads with contemporary eyes. Anything from that era seems to be exaggerated, especially when it comes to Art Deco or streamlining.

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Really makes the car look great.  A bit like the art work in the old Dick Tracey cartoon strips.

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1937hd45.... wanna' see exaggerated ?  Kaiser/ Frazier/ Henry J was one of the best .... The folks in this car would have been about 3 ft. tall, ha !

1951 Henry J Ad-01.jpg

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44 minutes ago, keiser31 said:

I have always loved this 1936 Chrysler ad. Low and long....

1936 Chrysler ad.jpg

Period ads made it easy for west coast choppers as all they did was to cut the car to look like the ads. I once saw 2 1959 Edsels in a garage. One looked like a "3/4 ton". The owner said it had new, properly arched springs. I preferred the more low rider look. LOL

 

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32 minutes ago, keiser31 said:

Nope....those are 1938s in the video. The original ad cars are 1936 Plymouths.

nothing gets by you, not even a car crashing through a burning wall. :lol:

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1 minute ago, GregLaR said:

The Buenos Aires cars appear to be right hand drive....

 

That is correct....for the era.

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1 hour ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

It is nice.  But I wouldn't quite call it pristine.  I had one in similar shape in the mid 90's.  I have a photo of it taken in the winter when we got it out on a nice day and drove it out in the yard for some photos. (not in the salt)  Original paint.  My Dad and I rebuilt the motor in it.  I drove it around a little.  Put in a few new pieces of glass and a top insert because the original was beyond saving.  Still had original interior as well. About the same shape.  Neat car.  Sold it to a fellow and saw it 10 years later at Hershey in the car corral.  Ended up selling to a guy that lives a half hour away.  He's brought it by a few times for pointers as he's not really mechanically inclined.  

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10 hours ago, keiser31 said:

It's the export model that has Plymouth sheet metal.

A precursor of what became the Dodge Kingsway starting with 1946 models; a model never sold in U.S or Canada.

 

Craig

Edited by 8E45E (see edit history)

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Thanks for sharing these with us, it is always great to see period images etc that one hasn't viewed before. Thanks to all for your observations and comments as well it serves us all well to get more information for a greater understanding of that era! I know from what I have in my own archives and library that sales literature was designed,  created, and printed in England, France and Germany for some cars manufactured in the USA but exported to Europe. Their catalogs would use images created in America but would often also see artists of their countries create the images, both for sales and magazine ads. Plymouth, Hudson  (late 1930s era) , Ford, Packard , and especially Lincoln (in France in 1931 and 1932) had some really amazing promotional literature. Coach builders catalogs from Van Den Plas often featured ( in illustrations) cars with their bodies but an American chassis. This post is great stuff and is of special interest to a guy like me who has for some time researched the history of pre WWII era war coachwork on any and all chassis. thanks again.

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8 hours ago, auburnseeker said:

It is nice.  But I wouldn't quite call it pristine.  I had one in similar shape in the mid 90's.  I have a photo of it taken in the winter when we got it out on a nice day and drove it out in the yard for some photos. (not in the salt)  Original paint.  My Dad and I rebuilt the motor in it.  I drove it around a little.  Put in a few new pieces of glass and a top insert because the original was beyond saving.  Still had original interior as well. About the same shape.  Neat car.  Sold it to a fellow and saw it 10 years later at Hershey in the car corral.  Ended up selling to a guy that lives a half hour away.  He's brought it by a few times for pointers as he's not really mechanically inclined.  

It is not pristine, but a great example of a car for sale, in good shape for it's age. Can be bought in the 12-15K range. And with some cleaning and wrenching, could be a great entry level car, at a good buy in price for someone wanting to get involved with the cars. And have a very nice styled 30's coupe.

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9 minutes ago, Xander Wildeisen said:

It is not pristine, but a great example of a car for sale, in good shape for it's age. Can be bought in the 12-15K range. And with some cleaning and wrenching, could be a great entry level car, at a good buy in price for someone wanting to get involved with the cars. And have a very nice styled 30's coupe.

I don't argue that,  I just love when people state something that the naked eye can see from the photos is incorrect. 

I think Mechanically the 36 and up cars share alot so everything can be easily had to get it up and running.  There have been a couple of 34 Plymouths for sale, even a little nicer style with older,  decent ameture-ish but very presentable restorations for 16,500-17,500.  Lots of cars around to buy into the hobby once you break the 10 G barrier. 

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That is what I'd call an exceptional find, Diego...

 

Who are you writing for now, or are you freelancing?

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To answer your question about whether or not that art was used in the USA....(edit) I don't think any of that particular art was used in the USA brochures.

Edited by keiser31 (see edit history)

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In the mid-thirties, a fair amount of literature was put out stateside on the Thrill Show theme, extolling the virtues of all-steel body construction. Mainly, it was Chrysler Corp selling against GM’s wood and steel bodies. This may be an export example of that. Or a Thrill Show program. Hard to say. One thing for sure: it is a great piece of literature.

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1 hour ago, knee-action said:

In the mid-thirties, a fair amount of literature was put out stateside on the Thrill Show theme, extolling the virtues of all-steel body construction. Mainly, it was Chrysler Corp selling against GM’s wood and steel bodies. This may be an export example of that. Or a Thrill Show program. Hard to say. One thing for sure: it is a great piece of literature.

 

If true, it's the CKD version of that because all the people and the printing of the item point to being Argentina-centric.

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