ChuckR

Seized Piston 1906 Franklin

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After having the engine run, then slow and stop three times, I realized the '06G is likely seizing a piston. Pulling the auxiliary valves revealed that #4 piston (aluminum, not cast iron) was scored.  The others are smooth.  OK.  The issue is how to remove #4 jug and get to the piston. It looks as if I have to drop the engine and flywheel off from the cross rails in order to reach the bolts. Or is it better to raise the engine, mount it on some kind of support, remove the cross rails and work it that way.  Also, separating the clutch and transmission?  Is there a practiced way to do that?  Or brace up the engine from below, remove the cross rails and work at the jug.  The last idea strikes me as best (simplest?) but I'm hoping to tap into more experience. 

 

The problem with the nuts holding down the jug are twofold. First, they require and open-end wrench to remove, they are too close to the jug's wall for a socket, and next that two of the bolts are next to the cross rail which limits open-end access. 

 

Any thoughts?

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Chuck, be sure to try to remedy this impediment to topside repair when you get it apart.  Perhaps making smaller nuts from stock so that a socket might fit.  The 12 torpedo is this way also and nothing I could do to facilitate individual cylinder removal. No. 6 will stop at the firewall so I need to disconnect engine from trans and move all forward too.  Feel your pain.

JR

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I braced the engine from below and removed one cross-member.  I used an open end wrench head adapted for 90 degree approach. Once the nuts were loose, they could come off by hand.  
The seizing was a blessing in disguise, the rod bearing was loose as hell and i likely could have had a major injury to the motor.  Under the theory that if one is bad, the others are suspect, I think it is time for some serious engine work...sigh.

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I always wonder that when all these old cars were running when parked.   Few were probably running well when parked,  that's why they were parked.  I went through it all with a 36 Chrysler convertible.  I have never seen so many worn out (badly) internals on an engine.  It was an uphill slope to the garage where the car was parked that I bought it from and I swear they must have somehow pushed it up the hill to park it because there is no way it had enough left in it to get there on it's own when they parked it. 

Good luck.  Maybe other stuff inside won't be so worn. 

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