leomara

Collector Car Market for Pre War Dying???

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10 hours ago, oldcarfudd said:

Brass cars stay at home?  Codswallop!  The HCCA runs weekend and week-long tours all over the country.  The Snappers, an AACA brass group, does several tours a year, some in conjunction with HCCA.  There are independent brass clubs doing week-long progressive tours.  As you read this, a former HCCA president, his two sons, and two of his grandkids are taking a month to drive two 1911 Model Ts across the country on back roads.  And they're blogging it, so you can read about it as they go along.

 

https://ca2vabyt.com

 

All cars on HCCA national tours are now at least 103 years old.  And no, we don't remember them from our youth.  Maybe you don't see them at AACA judging meets because we're too busy getting grease on our clothes and under our fingernails!

 

Cool blog!  Thanks for the link.

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22 hours ago, leomara said:

So I'm looking to find a 1929 Chrysler Model 75 roadster in acceptable condition (not show restored) and in the past few years....nothing.  

 

Why that particular car? There are lots of similar pre-war cars out there, but when you choose a particular make model and year, you are boxing yourself in for a longer search. I am not very knowledgeable about any Chrysler products. In spite of a couple of decades of pre-war ownership, I had to do a Google search to find out exactly what that particular car looked like. 90+ percent of the General Public who see that particular car are likely to ask you to tell them about your Model A or Model T Ford, which just shows how little the General Public knows about antique cars. 

 

There appears to be one listed for sale on Hemmings right now with no photo and what sounds like a crazy price to me. If you broaden your search a bit, you will find lots of similar cars that you could be enjoying now. I owned a lot of Model A Fords and a few other cars over the past 20 or so years. Now, I seem to have caught the Buick bug. We are having fun. I have one that is fun to drive, one that I am enjoying restoring, and another that I bought for parts that I can't bear to tear apart so I will be selling it to someone else soon so it can be restored and enjoyed so I don't have to leave it outside while I am restoring the other one. My experience tells me that you can have fun with all sorts of old cars. My first Model A was a rusty car that I bought for $5,000 when I was 35 years old. We had a blast with it. My last Model A was a repeat Senior Grand National award winning car that we also toured with. After we had plenty of fun with it, I sold it. I actually made a profit when I sold it after having had a lot of fun with it.

 

I guess my point is, you don't have to find your exact dream car to enter the hobby and start having fun. The first antique car that I fell in love with was a 1937 Buick four door sedan that I saw when I was in my early 20's. When I started in the hobby, it was with a cheap Model A Ford. After I retired, I remembered that I had vowed that I would one day own a 1937 Buick four door sedan. I now drive that car, and am restoring a 1938 Buick four door sedan. There is no reason that you have to wait for the perfect car. Very few people in the hobby only have one collector car in their lifetime. Why wait?

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Some times the hunt for a specific year/make/model, can be as much fun as owning the car. It can be the motivation to pound the pavement, going to shows and swap meets, asking people if they know of a car hidden some where. Make sure you have the funds to buy the car no matter what condition it is in. 

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I'm in the lucky position of being able to try a lot of cars on for size and something I've found over the years is that many cars I always wanted to own turn out to be turkeys while cars that I never dreamed I'd love are now on my must-have list. That has led to me changing my philosophy about collecting from "buy what may make you happy" to "buy what makes you happy." A subtle difference and the only thing that has really changed is that I don't decide ahead of time what will make me happy. I try everything in that price range that appeals to me and buy the one that makes me smile the widest, whatever it is. Opening your focus like that will expose you to a lot of great cars that maybe you never would have considered if you were just going by what's on paper.

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Why a 1929 Chrysler Model 75 roadster?  That's an interesting question which has infinite answers.  I own a 1930 Ford coupe which is the second Model A I've restored.  My interest has always been in cars from the late 20's to early 30's.  Amelia Earhart owned a Chrysler 75 roadster and the same car was featured prominently in the 1930 Our Gang comedy "Teachers Pet", with Miss Crabtree driving.  The headlights have to be outside of the fenders next to the radiator.  What else is there?  Why do any of us look to buy a specific car? 

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12 hours ago, Brass is Best said:

I will be happy to take any unwanted prewar cars. I will give them a good home.

 

I can't wait for the DV-32"s and the 2.9 Alfa’s to crash so I can have several of each. 

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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12 minutes ago, edinmass said:

 

I can't wait for the DV-32"s and the 2.9 Alpha"s to crash so I can have several of each. 

 

Makes me think of those buyers who bought the DV-32 at the bottom of its first depreciation cycle. Well, can't dwell on that long. I'm heading out, in what could be called my QV-48, for a nice long ride. And enjoy the depreciation prices.

Bernie

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Some forum members have access to a wide range of drivable pre- war cars and a wide circle of fellow owners in order to get familiar with the driving experience of many different pre-war cars.

 For many of us however the opportunity to actually drive a pre -war car is a very rare thing indeed.  Even if there is a car locally for sale many sellers are going  to be hesitant to let a prospective buyer drive the car unless they feel there is a very good chance of a sale. And many of the early cars I see in my region aren't quite road ready, been sitting for several years as the owners age advanced, etc. 

 Even if you join a local club it seems few fellow club members are prepared to let someone else drive their cars , especially if you don't have a driving car yourself to enable a temporary swap.

 People in a situation like Matt Harwood are ideally positioned to drive many different cars and form an informed decision when buying.

 But for some of us it's more or less a crapshoot. Until you own it or are on the brink of buying it, you probably can't drive it.

 

Greg in Canada

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)
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31 minutes ago, 1912Staver said:

 Even if you join a local club it seems few fellow club members are prepared to let someone else drive their cars , especially if you don't have a driving car yourself to enable a temporary swap.

 People in a situation like Matt Harwood are ideally positioned to drive many different cars and form an informed decision when buying.

 But for some of us it's more or less a crapshoot. Until you own it or are on the brink of buying it, you probably can't drive it.

 

Greg in Canada

 

 

Greg, come out to our Bring a Buddy Event event at Ken's place on July 8 and you can try my brass car.   I'm happy to let others try it out.  Not so much so with my motorcycles.     Peter

 

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43 minutes ago, 1912Staver said:

Some forum members have access to a wide range of drivable pre- war cars and a wide circle of fellow owners in order to get familiar with the driving experience of many different pre-war cars.

 For many of us however the opportunity to actually drive a pre -war car is a very rare thing indeed.  Even if there is a car locally for sale many sellers are going  to be hesitant to let a prospective buyer drive the car unless they feel there is a very good chance of a sale. And many of the early cars I see in my region aren't quite road ready, been sitting for several years as the owners age advanced, etc. 

 Even if you join a local club it seems few fellow club members are prepared to let someone else drive their cars , especially if you don't have a driving car yourself to enable a temporary swap.

 People in a situation like Matt Harwood are ideally positioned to drive many different cars and form an informed decision when buying.

 But for some of us it's more or less a crapshoot. Until you own it or are on the brink of buying it, you probably can't drive it.

 

Greg in Canada

 

Come for a visit and you can drive any car you like!

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16 minutes ago, PFindlay said:

 

 

Greg, come out to our Bring a Buddy Event event at Ken's place on July 8 and you can try my brass car.   I'm happy to let others try it out.  Not so much so with my motorcycles.     Peter

 

Thanks Peter, that sounds great! I really enjoyed the Easter run in your Cadillac.

 

Greg

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46 minutes ago, Matt Harwood said:

 

Come for a visit and you can drive any car you like!

Thanks Matt, unfortunately you are 2500 miles and an international border away. Not to mention a very lightweight $ Cdn, Have you considered opening a Western Canada branch ?

The first two pages of your inventory have more interesting cars for sale than my entire geographical region. Vancouver area craigslist currently has 47 pre-war street rods, 9 stock pre war Fords, 7 stock pre-war non- Fords, all very ordinary sedans except 1 late 20's lower line Peerless sedan. Not too much to get excited about, and nothing that looks like a reasonable price at that. It's actually been about 4 years since I have seen a vintage car locally that I was even tempted by. PFindlay's brother had a vintage Vauxhall I was very taken with but it was ultimately beyond my reach.

 

Greg

Edited by 1912Staver (see edit history)

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2 hours ago, edinmass said:

 

I can't wait for the DV-32"s and the 2.9 Alpha"s to crash so I can have several of each. 

 

If I find one of those in the scrap bin I will send it your way Ed. If you find any brass era Packards set out on the curb let me know.

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On 6/28/2018 at 9:19 AM, leomara said:

Why a 1929 Chrysler Model 75 roadster?  That's an interesting question which has infinite answers.  I own a 1930 Ford coupe which is the second Model A I've restored.  My interest has always been in cars from the late 20's to early 30's.  Amelia Earhart owned a Chrysler 75 roadster and the same car was featured prominently in the 1930 Our Gang comedy "Teachers Pet", with Miss Crabtree driving.  The headlights have to be outside of the fenders next to the radiator.  What else is there?  Why do any of us look to buy a specific car? 

 

I spent two decades with Model A Fords. I switched to a 1937 Buick Century. I am currently restoring a 1938 Buick Century.  It has the headlights outside of the fenders next to the radiator, but it is amazingly more advanced than a Model A Ford. I love how it looks and love how it drives. I have no plans to sell it. 

 

Yes, I let other people drive it. Putting someone behind the wheel of an antique car is the best way to help insure that the hobby survives long term. 

 

I actually have an 82 year old fellow who is coming to see me this weekend because he is attempting to recapture the experience of his first car, an identical 1937 Buick Century Model 61. He wanted to buy it after seeing it's photo in an issue of the NC Region News. He wants a ready to drive car since at 84 he is ready to drive and not ready to do a lot of mechanical work. I told him that I have no desire to sell it, but he can come on down and visit and drive it. When pressured, I gave him a crazy high price that I would allow it to go away for, but told him that he would be crazy to buy it because it is not worth that much money.

 

He has me slightly worried that I may have not given him a high enough price. When he first talked with me, he had a boat that he needed to sell before he could afford to buy a car. He emailed me to let me know he sold the boat. If he offers me the crazy price, I am a man of my word and will sell it. If so, then I have to find another one. I have been doing some research just in case. If he buys it, I have a couple of similar cars that I have located that need work that I can do to get it to the condition that I need it to be.   

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2 hours ago, Matt Harwood said:

Come for a visit and you can drive any car you like!

 

You are just four hours down RT 90 (or 20) from me and I keep thinking what a good day trip that could be. You had a Silver Spur last year that almost got me there.

 

You know that story about hanging around the barber shop....

 

I am lucky enough to have driven a lot of collector cars of a wide range of types. The one car that stands out above all in my memory is the light blue 1949 Cadillac convertible that Dick Walthers recently sold. Two mistakes were made on that car. The owner sold it to Dick and I didn't buy it. Whoever owns it now has one of the best driving cars out there. It sets the precedent for an unrestored car.

 

Bernie

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Guess I prefer small overpowered cars to land yachts. Remember being at events and how big my American V8s (A, F, and H body GM) seemed. Even the B/P '63 vette seemed big compared to a Sunbeam Tiger or 289 Cobra but was hard to pass when sideways.

That said I only have one V8, the rest are my first love, 6cyls: CIB, SOHC, & DOHC. 12 valves, 18 valves, and 24 valves. Range from 6 to 48 years old. Three AACA eligible. DD is an '01. Newest is the tow car.

Of course all have factory AC. No need now to consider anything else.

Is one of the nice parts of living in a target rich no rust area.

 

3D printer should arrive soon, are some small plastic parts that are just not available. These are the good old days.

 

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12 hours ago, edinmass said:

 

I can't wait for the DV-32"s and the 2.9 Alpha"s to crash so I can have several of each. 

I'll take all the T & L Head Mercers you find inferior, and the underpowered 1750 Alfa Romeos. Bob 

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I do t find the Mercer’s inferior, I just was raised around the Stutz crowd. The 1750 Alfa’s are fine, I usually prefer the earlier stuff, but the 2.9’s are just a bit more intriguing.

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You guys are all very friendly and engaging.  Thanks for all the input and opinions and if any of you comes across a 29 Chrysler 75 roadster please advise. 

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On 6/28/2018 at 8:22 AM, 1912Staver said:

Some forum members have access to a wide range of drivable pre- war cars and a wide circle of fellow owners in order to get familiar with the driving experience of many different pre-war cars.

 For many of us however the opportunity to actually drive a pre -war car is a very rare thing indeed.  Even if there is a car locally for sale many sellers are going  to be hesitant to let a prospective buyer drive the car unless they feel there is a very good chance of a sale. And many of the early cars I see in my region aren't quite road ready, been sitting for several years as the owners age advanced, etc. 

 Even if you join a local club it seems few fellow club members are prepared to let someone else drive their cars , especially if you don't have a driving car yourself to enable a temporary swap.

 People in a situation like Matt Harwood are ideally positioned to drive many different cars and form an informed decision when buying.

 But for some of us it's more or less a crapshoot. Until you own it or are on the brink of buying it, you probably can't drive it.

 

Greg in Canada

 

Very true.  When I was looking to buy my first antique car, I spoke to a guy at a car show who had the same car I wanted.  He was incredibly generous in inviting me to take his car out for a drive so I could get a feel for it.  That experience was super helpful in me getting comfortable with that year and model car, as I had never driven anything remotely like it.  We became friends and would hang out together at car shows for many years after that.  (I bought my first antique, that same year/model car,  a year later.) On the other hand,  I would guess a lot of us have had the experience of  looking seriously at and even buying cars for sale that we had no relevant experience driving before.  In those cases, "going for a test drive" can mean not just evaluating the condition of that car but also trying to get a quick feel for the experience of driving that year/brand/model.  It can be a lot to process.

 

Edited by 1935Packard (see edit history)
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Why indeed a 1929 roadster. ?

 

Take a look at Harwood's 1931 Chrysler  Roadster..a more attractive design, with superb engineering.

 

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I have always let people drive my cars, especially when they are members of the clubs I belong to. The Pierce club years ago had a handful of people who began to swap cars between stops on tour. This evolved into letting new members and attendees taking cars for drives. I often let members from other parts of the country drive my cars on tour while I ride in the back seat/rumble seat. About ten years ago, while at the Gilmore Museum for a national show, a twelve year old young man said I had the best car on the field........far from it, but I enjoyed his comment so much I let him sit in the car. He turned to his grandmother and said “some day I will own and drive a car like this one” a 1932 Pierce Sport Coupe. With the Gilmore track right next to me, I asked him if he had drive a lawn mower. He said yes. I asked his grandmother if it would be ok to let him drive the car around the track. She said sure.."..the young man couldn’t believe he was going to have a chance to drive the car. I gave him a three minute lesson on how to clutch, shift, and control the gas. I explained to him that I would take over if there were any problems, and do exactly as I say. He drove around the loop in first one time, and was shifting through the gears and I had to hold him back from speeding! He was a natural driver.......the entire thing was on a cell phone video and placed up on you tube. It was quite a lot of fun to share a car that way. Over the years hundreds of people have driven my cars........and it’s been nothing but positive experiences. A few years ago on Martha’s Vinyard in the same 32 Pierce a guy came up to me telling a story about his grandfathers 32 Pierce sedan. I ended up letting him drive the car twenty miles around the island. Became good friends with him over the years, and now I stay at his place when we visit! The more you share your car, the more you get out of it.

Edited by edinmass (see edit history)
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3 hours ago, edinmass said:

I have always let people drive my cars, especially when they are members of the clubs I belong to.

 

This is very true.  Ed forced me to drive is Pierce Arrow and made me promise to join the club.  Now I'm a "Pierce Arrow" guy. 

 

Supporting the clubs is important, although I'm spread across so many that the best I can do is pay membership and push them on to my friends.  The guys doing the real work of keeping them going deserve our gratitude.

 

 

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I predict that after driving two different V-12 Pierce cars, AJ will soon own one.............just knowing what great drivers they are now.............he will soon get on board.

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