Restorer32

Model 48 Locomobile

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Yes, that is the same Loco that Alex Stein drove on the 1950 Glidden tour, next caretaker was Len Dryer. When Len passed on it bounced around the auction circuit, until it has the home it has now. Bob

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Didn't Phil Bray own that green roadster towards the end of his life? I remember being on a tour with him 7-8 years ago and he had just acquired it. It was cold and rainy that week, but he ran that sucker without hesitation and later said it was the best old car he'd ever owned.

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Yes, Phil Bray did own that roadster. He may have purchased it from or through Mark Smith, can't remember exactly.He sold it at an RM auction before his unfortunate passing. Phil was a talented mechanic and a great enthusiast. He drove all of his cars with the gusto of Barney Oldfield. Phil really knew how to enjoy this hobby.

 

I have driven a couple of well sorted out Model 48s and they are true road warriors. Once you get them going, its like driving a high speed locomotive. The earlier examples seem to be more nimble than the later examples, but they are all great cars. It is no wonder why the pioneer collectors held these cars in such high esteem.

Edited by motoringicons (see edit history)

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“of course, nothing is worser than driving a Mercer!”  Written while looking at a world class Stutz.

 

You gotta be nutz to drive a Stutz!  reply of the Mercer owner...............

 

I was at Hershey about 30 years ago and a fella was selling his model 48, I believe around a 1918 model and his buddy asked why..................  It was in the car corral

 

Older fella replied, I enjoy driving my model A roadster better. Easier to stop, more nimble, and a heck of a lot of fun! Last time I was out in the Loco, couldnt stop the damn thing with the rear wheel brakes. Far too heavy and difficult to steer.

I was eaves dropping.

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On ‎7‎/‎5‎/‎2018 at 10:44 PM, 1937hd45 said:

Yes, that is the same Loco that Alex Stein drove on the 1950 Glidden tour, next caretaker was Len Dryer. When Len passed on it bounced around the auction circuit, until it has the home it has now. Bob

Bob, did this car ever reside in Gaylordsville, CT? I seem to remember running across it there in the 1960's. Can't remember if the little gas station there was working on it or if they said they owned it?  My brother also mentioned years ago he ran across a big Loco owned by some scrap yard in CT?

 

Howard Dennis

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Dean, The Garlordsville Loco was a smaller one, think it was a model 38. It graced the lawn at Pebble Beach last year in the unrestored class, current owner has a great eclectic collection of cars and posts regularly on the HAMB. The junkyard Loco is in Dells Auto Wrecking in Danbury the old Alex Stiein pickup truck Coupe conversion. 

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1 hour ago, 1937hd45 said:

Dean, The Garlordsville Loco was a smaller one, think it was a model 38. It graced the lawn at Pebble Beach last year in the unrestored class, current owner has a great eclectic collection of cars and posts regularly on the HAMB. The junkyard Loco is in Dells Auto Wrecking in Danbury the old Alex Stiein pickup truck Coupe conversion. 

Thanks Bob, I figured you would know. Right after I posted this I remembered a 1920's green touring that used to go roaring up Quaker Hill in Pawling in top gear while I was teenager cutting lawns for spending money in the early 1960's. Guess we saw more than the average number of Locomobile's in our youth.

 

 

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I'm guessing this is a Locomobile. The photo was taken in New London, Connecticut around 1912. My great-uncle was the chauffeur. The owners of the car were named "Poor" - which, needless to say, turned into something of a local joke. I apologize for the poor photo, the original is only about 1-1/2 inches long.

 

2137778029_LocomobileinNewLondon.thumb.jpg.8c12b4edf50ba8e406da7f53aaeac370.jpg

 

Of course, he wasn't supposed to use the car to run errands so they bought him a runabout...

 

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Edited by JV Puleo (see edit history)
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Yes, the upper picture is 1912 Loco. 7p touring.  Attached is a photo of my 1911 Loco 48.  The first year for the 48.   It has a 4p Torpedo body and was the forerunner of the Sportif.     I won the Grand Champion Award at the OlD Car Festival at GFVillage in 2016. 

 

 

3DDCA43F-7FE5-45FB-967A-72A168FF5BD6.jpeg

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The green Locomobile roadster we've been discussing had supposedly had the back of the body cut off and was then used as a truck in a shipyard in Boston. Ultimately the car was sold and the back half of the body was rebuilt into the present form by Merrimac. So though Alex Stein later owned the car, I don't know if this was actually the "baggage car." When Alex Stein died, Lee Davenport was the executor of his estate, which supposedly included a garage full of Locomobile spare parts. Lee was the owner of my Sportif, and I suspect that my wheel rims -- which are absolutely pristine, with perfect "Firestone" engraving visible -- were NOS from the Stein parts cache. Lee also commissioned a restoration of my car in the early 1970s.   

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James, When Alex Stein passed away there were two Loco 48s, the green car above and a Coupe with a pickup bed, small Rolls Royce and a very nice 1929 Lincoln that had a Merrimac body if my memory is correct. Bob Stark drove that on tours for years, think he left it to the CCCA Museum. Bob

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Perhaps within the next 6 months or so you may see a story on the Locomobile dealer that was in New York City on the upper west side . Emlen S. Hare was his name, and he was also a VP at Packard in 1918.

I have the showroom album he had for his dealership that consists of huge b & w photographs mounted on linen showing a variety of body styles on the 38 and 48 series chassis. Locomobile has always been of interest to me especially because of the era when James Frank de Causse was responsible for their styling. I do not own a Locomobile but do have a part for  one ( complete radiator and shell of the 1916-1919 era) resting against my garage wall that I can walk past every time I am in the garage. My own personal tribute and a momento  of one of the finest cars ever made in America.

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I have quite a collection of Loco literature that was accumulated through the years by Lee Davenport and possibly Alexander Stein. Would love to see your catalog. Of course you know that Emlen Hare later put together a manufacturing venture that included Locomobile.

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Yes, Emlen Hare was quite a well known figure in the 1917-35 era, but is little mentioned today by author's in articles. The story will most likely appear in Hemmings Classic Car magazine, not sure yet, I have a lot of research, story's etc going on currently. Lee Davenport was a fine gentleman, and great enthusiast . We used to have conversations at the annual HCCA pre 1942 car show that was held in the school yard at Ridgefield , Ct. every September. in addition to the showroom album I have a fair amount of Locomobile factory issued portfolio's , as well as individual publicity photographs issued by coachbuilders that used a Locomobile chassis as a base for their creations. Many of the photos taken by John Adams Davis.

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The Ridgefield Meet, a mile up the road 200+ pre 1943 vehicles every year, Peter Helck would drive the Greatest Loco "Old 16" to the meet and home again, those were the days! Bob 

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2 hours ago, 1937hd45 said:

The Ridgefield Meet, a mile up the road 200+ pre 1943 vehicles every year, Peter Helck would drive the Greatest Loco "Old 16" to the meet and home again, those were the days! Bob 

Boy don't you know it Bob! As a fairly new driver at 17 in 1966 I thought my old worn out 1961 Falcon 144 was going to blow up trying to keep up with Peter on RT. 22 heading to my first Ridgefield meet. I backed off at 75 MPH and Peter was pulling away!  I'll never forget the sight of those drive chains arching up off "Old 16's"  rear wheels  and the bark of those exhaust stacks!


Howard Dennis

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1 hour ago, hddennis said:

Boy don't you know it Bob! As a fairly new driver at 17 in 1966 I thought my old worn out 1961 Falcon 144 was going to blow up trying to keep up with Peter on RT. 22 heading to my first Ridgefield meet. I backed off at 75 MPH and Peter was pulling away!  I'll never forget the sight of those drive chains arching up off "Old 16's"  rear wheels  and the bark of those exhaust stacks!


Howard Dennis

WOW! Not many people can get the same feeling as the second place finisher in the 1908 Vanderbilt Cup. When I drive up Rt 33 out of Wilton I think of Ken Purdy in his MERCER along that 1/2 mile straight section just before his house. Great cars roaming the roads back then. Bcb 

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Bob- Somewhere, I have a photo of our 1912 Ts parked together at the Ridgefield meet. Egads, that would have been  about 25 years ago. How time flies….

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1 hour ago, motoringicons said:

Bob- Somewhere, I have a photo of our 1912 Ts parked together at the Ridgefield meet. Egads, that would have been  about 25 years ago. How time flies….

Soccer killed the Ridgefield meet, the town poured a half million into the fields upgrade and all vehicles are banned from it. Major reason that sport is on my - - - - list. Sure would like to see that photo of our '12 T's. Speaking of "Old 16" did you ever get any seat time in it? Bob 

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Bob- 

44 minutes ago, 1937hd45 said:

Soccer killed the Ridgefield meet, the town poured a half million into the fields upgrade and all vehicles are banned from it. Major reason that sport is on my - - - - list. Sure would like to see that photo of our '12 T's. Speaking of "Old 16" did you ever get any seat time in it? Bob 

 

The Ridgefield photos are buried somewhere, but I'll try to find them. It is hard to believe at one time we actually took photos using film cameras and had the photos printed!!!

 

Yes, I did get some seat time in Old 16. Here is a  photo of me in the driver's seat when we were filming the car driving around the village. Also, here is a video that was made for the Old 16 display. It is a combination of original footage and prints combined with new black and white footage. I am the goggled-wearing driver in the new black and white footage. That footage was shot at the Ford Proving Grounds in Dearborn.

 

The only other car that I have driven that came close to the Old 16 experience was a GP Mercedes, but that is another story….

 

 

 

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Edited by motoringicons (see edit history)

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Sorry for the thread drift, but I'll bet this is the photo Guy is referring to. I took it in 1991- first time I drove my own T to the Ridgefield meet-even went across the Tappan Zee Bridge.

IMG_20180711_173948597.jpg

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WOW!!! That was impressive, Chris.

 

Yes, that is indeed Bob's black 1912 and my maroon 1912 T on the showfield in Ridgefield.

 

I certainly remember you in your green brass T pickup and the New Jersey crew driving their cars to the meet. Those were great times.

 

My 1912 still looks the about same although it has probably been driven another 30K miles since that picture was taken. Today, it is appropriately less shiny, more worn and nowhere near as clean as it was 25-odd years ago.

 

I am glad you also took a photo of our two cars. I don't know if I would  have ever be able to find my photos.

 

Thanks so much for posting this great photo. Hope you and the family are doing well.

 

Cheers, old friend. 

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Thanks Chris! My 1912 was restored in 1950 by Elmer Bemis in Brattleboro, Vt. in time to go on the Glidden tour, still looks the same, brass is now dull. The restoration is three months older than I am and it was the very first "old car" I was ever given a ride in when I was about 12 years old, that made a big impression. Bob 

Edited by 1937hd45 (see edit history)

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